Bull Terrier

Breed Information

Breed Group: Terrier
Picture of a Bull Terrier

Pictures of Bull Terriers For Sale

  • Breed Standard Picture for Bull Terriers
  • Picture of a Bull Terrier Puppy
  • Picture of a Bull Terrier Puppy
  • Picture of a Bull Terrier Puppy
  • Picture of a Bull Terrier Puppy
  • Picture of a Bull Terrier Puppy
  • Picture of a Bull Terrier Puppy
  • Picture of a Bull Terrier Puppy
  • Picture of a Bull Terrier Puppy
  • Picture of a Bull Terrier Puppy
  • Picture of a Bull Terrier Puppy
  • Picture of a Bull Terrier Puppy

View More Pictures

Characteristics
Size:
Grooming Needs:
Exercise Needs:
Good With Dogs:
Watchdog Ability:
View Puppies
Overview
The Bull Terrier is a cross between the Bulldog and the Old English Terrier with a bit of Spanish Pointer in his bloodline. This breed originated in 1830 to attack bull in this sport of combat. They were soon replaced in 1850 with the White Cavalier and have since been used for many different things. The Bull Terrier has been used as a guard dog, a ratter, a herder, and a watchdog and does extremely well in all.
Character
The Bull Terrier is a lively breed but can also be lazy and quiet at times. A very muscular and well-built breed, this dog has a very sweet disposition and can be very affectionate. This dog requires an experienced handler as they can become dominant without the right training and socialization. The Bull Terrier is a very polite breed that is naturally obedient, however does need extensive training and requires a great deal of companionship.
Temperament
Fiery, energetic, and loving, this breed can also be protective of his owner and his territory, giving off somewhat of a fearless presence. This breed makes a good watch and/or guard dog. The Bull Terrier is very hardy and sturdy and can tolerate quite a bit of child's play, however should always be supervised, as Bull Terriers can be snippy if they are overly pestered. With proper socialization and training, this breed can do well with other dogs.
Care
The Bull Terrier does not require much grooming, and an occasional brushing with a rubber brush should be sufficient. Hand plucking may be necessary for dead hairs, but is usually cared for with a brush or comb. This breed is an average shedder, shedding only around twice a year. Removing loose hair should be simple when using a special rubber glove designed for such a task. Ear cleaning is necessary to prevent any difficulties in the future.
Coat
The coat of the Bull Terrier should always be short, flat and harsh, even being somewhat coarse to the touch. The hair should always be glossy and should be close lying. This breed should have tight skin, never wrinkly or saggy. Grooming this breed is fairly simple as the coat is very short. However, the Bull Terrier should be protected from the cold.
Training
Being somewhat willful and very independent, the Bull Terrier can be difficult to train. Obedience training should be started at an early age to avoid any issues in the future. Being that this breed is prone to dominance issues, firm and dominant handling is a must to prevent escalation into aggression. Bull Terriers are very eager to please although they can be very stubborn and difficult to train in any aspect.
Activity
The Bull Terrier is a very lively breed. A ball of fire, this dog requires quite a bit of exercise to stay healthy and active. At least a medium sized yard would work best as this breed has almost infinite energy. This breed requires long daily walks, twice a day is best, as they can become destructive if not given the proper stimulation and exercise requirements.
Weight
Male: 55-65; Female: 45-55 lbs
Height
21-22 inches
Color(s)
white variety: white, with markings on head permissible; colored variety: any color other than white, or any color with white markings; brindle prefer
Characteristics
Size:
Grooming Needs:
Exercise Needs:
Good With Dogs:
Watchdog Ability:

Featured Puppies for Sale

View More Puppies

Expected Budget: Buying vs. Owning in 2017

Learn what to expect when researching the price of Bull Terrier puppies.

How much do Bull Terrier puppies cost?

The cost to buy a Bull Terrier varies greatly and depends on many factors such as the breeders' location, reputation, litter size, lineage of the puppy, breed popularity (supply and demand), training, socialization efforts, breed lines and much more. Review how much Bull Terrier puppies for sale sell for below.

The current median price for all Bull Terriers sold is $1,350.00. This is the price you can expect to budget for a Bull Terrier with papers but without breeding rights nor show quality. Expect to pay less for a puppy without papers, however, we do not recommend buying a puppy without papers.

Looking for a dog with a superior lineage? Are you trying to determine how much a puppy with breeding rights and papers would cost? You should expect to pay a premium for a puppy with breeding rights or even for a puppy advertised as show quality with papers. You should budget anywhere from $2,200 upwards to $10,000 or even more for a Bull Terrier with top breed lines and a superior pedigree. The average cost for all Bull Terriers sold is $1,200.

View Prices of Puppies

What can I expect to pay for a puppy?

Median Price: $1,350.00
Average Price: $1,200.00
Top Quality: $2,200.00 to $10,000.00

*Data sourced from the sale of 4006 Bull Terrier puppies across the United States on NextDayPets.com.

Annual cost of owning a Bull Terrier puppy

Before buying a puppy it is important to understand the associated costs of owning a dog. The annual cost or "upkeep" is often overlooked when determining a Bull Terriers true ownership cost. When calculating your budget make sure you account for the price of food, vaccines, heartworm, deworming, flea control, vet bills, spay/neuter fees, grooming, dental care, food, training and supplies such as a collar, leash, crate, bed, bowls, bones, and toys. All of these items can add up quickly so make sure you estimate anywhere from $500 - $2,000 or more for the first year then about $500 - $1,000 or more every year thereafter to meet the annual financial obligations of your growing, loving dog.

Get Matched with Bull Terrier Breeders using PuppyMatch

Create your PuppyMatch profile in just 3 minutes to save time and find your perfect puppy. Get matched with up to 5 dog breeders with puppies for sale based on your lifestyle.

Get Matched

Most Popular Bull Terrier Names for 2017

We've compiled the top 20 male and female names for 2017 after analyzing the sale of 4006 Bull Terrier dogs.
  • 1. Harry
  • 2. Oscar
  • 3. Paris
  • 4. Bella
  • 5. Rocky
  • 6. Daisy
  • 7. Thor
  • 8. Lucy
  • 9. Maggie
  • 10. Zeus
  • 11. Lilly
  • 12. Sweet Pea
  • 13. Andrea
  • 14. Red
  • 15. Beauty
  • 16. Bruno
  • 17. Cruz
  • 18. Max
  • 19. Tank
  • 20. Zoe

Finding a Puppy

Make sure you do your research before buying or adopting your four-legged companion.

Considering a Puppy?

  1. Choose the RIGHT Bull Terrier Breeder and the RIGHT breed
  2. Learn how to Safely Buy a Puppy Online
  3. Get the full scoop on all the New Puppy Basics
  4. Happy Puppy = Happy Owner: Dog Training Commandments
  5. Why should you Spay or Neuter Your Dog?

Bull Terrier may not be the right breed for you!

Try BreedMatch!

Featured Bull Terrier Breeder

Featured Breeder of Bull Terriers with Puppies For Sale
Beach Bull Terriers
Member Since: July 2017
Location: N/A
I have Bull Terrier puppies for sale! See My Profile
South Carolina Kennel committed to Bull Terriers. We are committed to raising them to have great temperment and family friendly personalities. All of our puppies are well socialized with other dogs and children.

Breed Q & A

Have a question about Bull Terriers? Ask our community of breed professionals or provide knowledgeable answers to users questions below.

Ask a Question
About Bull Terriers

Share what you know. Answer a question.

Anonymous asked:
What are the Bull Terrier's health issues?

1 Comment

Anonymous

The Bull Terrier is a relatively healthy breed of dog, but there are a few health concerns to be aware of. A good breeder will be screening their dogs for health problems before breeding and let you know the results when inquiring about a puppy. Some health problems the Bull Terrier breed has are Hereditary Nephritis (kidney disease), Heart disease, Skin Problems (allergies, and sunburns), OCD, Lens Luxation (when the lens of the eye is displaced), and then deafness. All puppies should be checked for deafness, which occurs in 20.4% of pure white Bull Terriers and 1.3% of colored Bull Terriers.

Anonymous asked:
Is a Bull Terrier aggressive?

3 Comments

Anonymous

Any dog can be aggressive. It's all on how they are raised.There are bad people who raise dogs wrong. Bully breeds always get a bad wrap. But all dogs need love.

Anonymous

All dogs can be aggressive! The Bull Terrier is a strong breed. It takes a strong owner to raise one. Not just physically but mentally. They are the Ferrari's of the dog world, don't treat it like a dodge.

Anonymous

But the answer is yes, if you dont let it socialise as a puppy or you miss treat it it has the potential to tear you to piecees.

Anonymous asked:
I'm very interested in having a Bull Terrier but I have a cat at home. My cat is used to dogs, but from what I've read, this breed doesn't get along well with other animals. I wanted a puppy so I could try to socialize them at a young age. Has anyone has any experience with this?

6 Comments

Anonymous

The Bull Terrier has a high prey drive, so having a cat around could be a problem. However, if you get your puppy from a breeder that socializes the pups with cats and then socialize your pup from a young age with your cat, then the pup should be fine. As long as your cat has an area where he/she can get out of the pups reach, then all should be fine. A couple of high cat tree's and/or a room that is baby gated off would work perfect for your cat so your pup can learn boundaries.

Anonymous

I recently got a Bull Terrier that my neighbor just left behind when she moved I took her in with 12 cats and 2 small dogs and a large pit bull. When I got a new kitten she attacked it when it came out of hiding and it killed me. I thought with all the other cats a small kitten wouldn't be a problem I was very wrong. I had a baby gate up to keep them separated but could still smell and see each other. Well, my Bull jumped the gate and bit my small kitten chasing it and cornering it till I found it. I thought I was doing a good thing helping this animal but she needs a single pet home or dogs only.

Anonymous

Bull Terriers have natural high prey drives, but does NOT necessarily mean it is aggressive. As an owner if you stay on top of training and early socialization a bull terrier can a great dog with both children and other animals. Getting a Bull Terrier as an adult when you don't know the social history of the dog can be a bad idea. As an owner, my Bull Terrier gets along Terrific with my cat and with our pit bull puppy. We breed her and have never had a problem with her puppies being aggressive. It is all in how you handle your dog, you MUST be the alpha dog, the pack leader!

Anonymous

My BT got along great with the cats it knew from when she was a puppy, it was the other dog she had issue with. (She wanted to be the only dog, and was very possessive of human affection)

Anonymous

Bull terriers are my favorite breed!! I will always have one in fact, We are on our third one!! She is much smaller than our first one!! Our first one was huge!! We have had 2 since her and I will always have a Bull terrier!! Now my husband is also a huge fan!!!

Anonymous

In my opinion a bully should be an only pet. This doesn't mean they can't get along with other pets... we rescued a bully at 6 months old. Great dog. Got along with our cat. Both indoor pets. About 3 years in, my husband was grilling, both pets were outside and our bully attacked and killed the cat. We didn't feed either table scraps but the only thing we could think of was the smell of the food may have led to the attack...plus we were unsure of our bullies history. After that a neighbors dog came in our yard and our bully attacked her. They had played together many times. We had to avoid other animals at this point. Our bully was a special pet to us. Never aggressive towards people. He recently passed and we are looking for another...

Anonymous asked:
I want to become a Bull Terrier breeder but don't know how to start, can anyone give me a hand or pointers?

3 Comments

Anonymous

If you are interested in being a breeder, you need to spend time with the breed first off. Secondly, you should mentor under a responsible, knowledgeable and reputable breeder. Look into the AKC, CKC or UKC website depending on where you live and contact a breeder near you. Start mentoring under them, go to shows and learn about the breed. Find the reason you want to breed. If it is for the money, don't do it. Good breeders don't make much money if any money when breeding is done right. Your reasons for breeding should always be to better the breed and to produce healthy, sound, well temperament puppies that will stay in loving, forever homes.

Anonymous

Animals are something important at the end of the day all dogs are beautiful in their own way and the only thing that matters is that these dogs find loving homes as long as they shall live.

Anonymous

CKC and UKC are NOT responsible nor reputable. You can basically buy your way into either of these. It's not necessarily the people in the group, it is their lack of stringent requirements for membership. DO NOT go with CKC or UKC. I did and I was so sorry. I'll never breed or buy any purebred other than AKC. Other than that I absolutely agree. Do it for the breed and for love of life. If you do it only for money, you'll find it's someone else who's making the money because it's HARD to make much money breeding bullies. One important thing is to only buy bullies who have documented testing for hearing (BAER test), luxated patellas and heart murmurs. These are the 3 biggest health risks in bullies. Also, but I don't know how to test for it, mange is a common problem with less healthy bloodlines and it doesn't show up till puberty.

Anonymous asked:
What is the life expectancy of Bull Terriers? What can be done from an owners perspective to extend their life expectancy as much as possible if we take good care of her since we got her as a puppy from a respected breeder?

2 Comments

Anonymous

The average live span of the Bull Terrier is 10 years. What you want to make sure is that the dam and sire of your pup has gone through all the health tests needed and have longevity in their pedigree's. Since you already have your pup, what I would suggest is to make sure you feed her a high quality grain free dog food, make sure she stays at a healthy weight, but do not over-exercise her at a young age. As well as get a check up done with her once to twice a year with a vet.

Anonymous

We kept our bully on high quality food. Exercise...check ups. He lived 11 years almost to the day...

Bull Terrier Puppies For Sale

At Next Day Pets® you can find the perfect four-legged companion from the comfort of your home, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Next Day Pets® employs stringent verification checkpoints to ensure our puppy listings are safe and secure. Take advantage of our PuppyMatch service or simply browse our massive directory of dog breeds, dog breeders and puppy for sale listings. Next Day Pets® provides the only safe and secure means of selecting and purchasing the perfect Bull Terrier puppy from the comfort of your home.

Updated: 11/20/2017