vaccinations

vaccinations

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dihart

Posts: 322

QUOTE 7/18/2009 7:29:01 AM
    Lets talk about vaccinations for pups. I always gave my first, a parvo shot,  at 6 weeks, and then at 8 weeks a 5-way booster, along with of course wormings as they are growing, every 2 weeks,  from 3 weeks on.  I am aware that vaacinating too early is counterproductive due to the mothers antibodies the pups receive thru her milk, but by 6 weeks, most of the time the nursing is down to a minimum  (tho not stopped entirely) as the pups have their teeth and mom not longer wants them chewing on her.  Besides they are ready for more food, that good dry crunchy kibble.

      I have read that some are not reccommending any shots until 8 weeks, and that some reccommend no parvo specific shot at all. Well actually I've read some  who do not believe in any shots, which I feel is not the best course of action for the puppy.  But I do not want to vaccinate too early either, just want them to have protection as they go off into their new family homes. There are just so many germs out there, parvo is rampant (I actually heard there my be a new strain of adult parvo. What a horrible thought) a worse condition for urban dwellers than rabies I believe.  Giardia is widespread also, tho there is not an effective preventative shot for that.

      Also, yearly vaccinations for adults- necessary or no?
beaglebrat

Posts: 1371

QUOTE 7/18/2009 11:33:58 AM
I think each breeder has to look at their risks and make their own decisions. If you have say a 8-9 week old litter, and maybe a younger litter or two, where you have a lot of people coming to look at your puppies, I get NeoPar in them as quickly as possible.  Like between 4.5-5 weeks.



I know that some say don't give it before 6 weeks, but if your puppies are dead of parvo by 6 weeks, the Neopar isn't going to do much good, is it?



NeoPar is a high titer vaccine that overrides the mother's immunity that they are getting through the milk. So you can give it to puppies that are still nursing, or in the weaning process. I have never had any Parvo problems in the last 3 years since giving NeoPar.



I then give a 4-way at 8 weeks right before they leave.



If someone only has the occasional litters, does not go to high traffic dog areas (like dog shows/vets), and has very few people to expose the dogs/puppies, I know of breeders that just give a 4-way shot at 6 or 8 weeks and their puppies have been fine so far. 



I only do yearly 6-way vaccinations on the dogs that go to dog shows frequently. Otherwise I let them go every 2-3 years.



It did bite me in the butt though, because I brought kennel cough home from a dog show this spring and I had a mess of hacking dogs. They say people who go to dog shows should do the nasal vaccine every 6 months on their dogs. I don't know about every 6 months, but I will be sure to get it done every year at least.



Kennel cough is probably the most contagious of all, because they can still be shedding the bacteria for several months after the dog stops coughing.

tolow240

Posts: 7

QUOTE 7/18/2009 9:45:44 PM
We have only had 2 litter of puppies so far, one in 2007 and then we have a litter now.  Before our first litter came along I asked our vet his recommendations.  I take them in for their 6 week vaccinations, and then start the deworming process as it is recommended which is roughly every 2 wks, at 8 wks, they get a booster and then with the first litter we even gave 1 at 10 wks, the vet stated that it would not hurt them, it would just be a little overprotective on our part.  Our first litter went to their new homes with no problems and never developed any problems since we keep in touch with the new owners, but people need to be aware that if you do have a litter and if they are not yet been vaccinated and someone comes to your home and kennel to view your puppies and they have picked up some virus at another kennel, you may be in for a lot of problems.  Our puppies are now 33 days old and actually they started eating puppy food a little over a week ago. Yes they still want to nurse but they are also wanting to eat puppy food and drink some nice fresh water.  There are alot of people out there that just wants to make money by breeding but not spend anything to take of the animals that they have.  If people don't want to spend money on the vet bills then personally they need to find something else to do.
moggie

Posts: 702

QUOTE 7/19/2009 6:15:20 PM

Quote beaglebrat:

I think each breeder has to look at their risks and make their own decisions. If you have say a 8-9 week old litter, and maybe a younger litter or two, where you have a lot of people coming to look at your puppies, I get NeoPar in them as quickly as possible.  Like between 4.5-5 weeks.



I know that some say don't give it before 6 weeks, but if your puppies are dead of parvo by 6 weeks, the Neopar isn't going to do much good, is it?



NeoPar is a high titer vaccine that overrides the mother's immunity that they are getting through the milk. So you can give it to puppies that are still nursing, or in the weaning process. I have never had any Parvo problems in the last 3 years since giving NeoPar.



I then give a 4-way at 8 weeks right before they leave.



If someone only has the occasional litters, does not go to high traffic dog areas (like dog shows/vets), and has very few people to expose the dogs/puppies, I know of breeders that just give a 4-way shot at 6 or 8 weeks and their puppies have been fine so far. 



I only do yearly 6-way vaccinations on the dogs that go to dog shows frequently. Otherwise I let them go every 2-3 years.



It did bite me in the butt though, because I brought kennel cough home from a dog show this spring and I had a mess of hacking dogs. They say people who go to dog shows should do the nasal vaccine every 6 months on their dogs. I don't know about every 6 months, but I will be sure to get it done every year at least.



Kennel cough is probably the most contagious of all, because they can still be shedding the bacteria for several months after the dog stops coughing.

 i agree with beagle.  neopar is a surefire was to keep parvo at bay. here was my routine. neopar at 5 weeks of age, galaxy at 7 weeks. i wormed every week with strongid starting at 2 weeks of age and then panacur 3 days in a row at 6 weeks.

if you are worried about giardia...use metronitazole. everything i have listed is available at revival animal health. they will even help you with instructions and dosages.  i swear by this regimen...i have solid proof that it fireproofs against parvo. 
runningridge

Posts: 102

QUOTE 8/15/2009 4:36:24 PM
We use Neopar at 5 weeks, Galaxy DA2PPv at 8, 11 and 14 weeks.

Pyrantel every 10 days starting at 2 weeks.  5 day dose of Fenbendazole

before going to new home which will take care of worms and Giardia if there

is an issue with it.  We do have an osmosis system and haven't had one case

of diagnosed Giardia since installing it. 

We also use Marquis at 5 and 8 weeks and haven't had a single case of

coccidia since 2 weeks after beginning to use it MANY YEARS ago.

If it happens to be flea season and I see any fleas on any of the dogs then we

will give Drontal Plus as well just to be sure our babies (*Young and old) are

not harboring any parasites. 
dorieellwell

Posts: 6

QUOTE 12/6/2009 7:37:29 PM
Just to make it safe, you may give vaccination based on the doctor's prescribed vaccination medicine given. After weeks from the vaccination, you may give your dog a bath.



Here is a Vaccination Schedule recommended by Dr. Jean Dodd (found this online): http://www.weim.net/emberweims/Vaccine.html

dihart

Posts: 322

QUOTE 9/30/2010 8:21:04 PM
Here is another vaccination schedule closer to what I have found to be effective and more often used. And it has information on adult dogs boosters that are needed.




































Age Vaccination
5 weeks Parvovirus: for puppies at high
risk of exposure to parvo, some veterinarians recommend vaccinating at 5
weeks. Check with your veterinarian.
6 & 9 weeks Combination vaccine* without leptospirosis.


Coronavirus: where coronavirus is a concern.
12 weeks or older Rabies: Given by your local veterinarian (age at vaccination may vary according to local law).
12 & 15 weeks** Combination vaccine


Leptospirosis: include leptospirosis in the combination vaccine where leptospirosis is a concern, or if traveling to an area where it occurs.


Coronavirus: where coronavirus is a concern.


Lyme: where Lyme disease is a concern or if traveling to an area where it occurs.
Adult (boosters)§ Combination vaccine


Leptospirosis: include leptospirosis in the combination vaccine where leptospirosis is a concern, or if traveling to an area where it occurs.


Coronavirus: where coronavirus is a concern.


Lyme: where Lyme disease is a concern or if traveling to an area where it occurs.


Rabies: Given by your local veterinarian (time interval between vaccinations may vary according to local law).
*A combination vaccine, often called a
5-way vaccine, usually includes adenovirus cough and hepatitis,
distemper, parainfluenza, and parvovirus. Some combination vaccines may
also include leptospirosis (7-way vaccines) and/or coronavirus. The
inclusion of either canine adenovirus-1 or adenovirus-2 in a vaccine
will protect against both adenovirus cough and hepatitis; adenovirus-2
is highly preferred.
**Some puppies may need additional vaccinations against parvovirus after 15 weeks of age. Consult with your local veterinarian.
§ According to the American Veterinary Medical
Association, dogs at low risk of disease exposure may not need to be
boostered yearly for most diseases. Consult with your local
veterinarian to determine the appropriate vaccination schedule for your
dog. Remember, recommendations vary depending on the age, breed, and
health status of the dog, the potential of the dog to be exposed to the
disease, the type of vaccine, whether the dog is used for breeding, and
the geographical area where the dog lives or may visit.
Bordetella and parainfluenza: For complete canine
cough protection, we recommend Intra-Trac II ADT. For dogs that are
shown, in field trials, or are boarded, we recommend vaccination every
six months with Intra-Trac II ADT.


Researchers at the Veterinary Schools at the
University of Minnesota, Colorado State University, and University of
Wisconsin suggest alternating vaccinations in dogs from year to year.
Instead of using multivalent vaccines (combination vaccines against more
than one disease), they recommend using monovalent vaccines which only
have one component, e.g., a vaccine that only contains parvovirus. So,
one year your dog would be vaccinated against distemper, the next year
against canine adenovirus-2, and the third year against parvovirus.
Then the cycle would repeat itself. Other researchers believe we may
not have enough information to recommend only vaccinating every 3 years.
Manufacturers of dog vaccines have not changed their labeling which
recommends annual vaccinations. Again, each dog owner must make an
informed choice of when to vaccinate, and with what. Consult with your
veterinarian to help you make the decision.



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