MORE spay neuter statistics

MORE spay neuter statistics

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rescuewench

Posts: 7081

QUOTE 7/25/2007 11:07:34 AM
The Perfect Spay Age
Female dogs should be altered between 12 and 16 weeks of age.



Dogs spayed before their first heat cycle have a 90 percent less chance of getting mammary cancer.

The second biggest health risk is pyometra, or uterine infection, which can occur at any time and requires emergency surgery to remove the uterus and ovaries. In our emergency hospitals, these surgeries usually cost close to $1,500 because the dogs are so sick. Untreated, affected dogs can die from sepsis if the infection spreads to their bloodstream.

Ovarian or uterine cancer is also possible in unspayed dogs, either of which is often fatal. Other diseases of the ovaries and uterus can also occur, including abscesses and cysts.

Finally, an unspayed dog often leads to unplanned puppies in a world where millions of dogs are euthanized every year because they do not have a home.

Numerous studies have shown that the younger the puppy is, the better they do with the surgery. Twelve to 16 weeks is a good age to have your puppy spayed, but do not wait longer than six months. There are no known long-term effects from early neutering.

Please strongly consider getting your dog spayed unless you are fully committed to breeding purebred puppies from a genetically screened sire, and finding each one the perfect home.

http://www.dogchannel.com/dog-information/dog-vet-geller-dvm/article_perfectspayage.aspx
noskiveez

Posts: 5655

QUOTE 7/25/2007 6:54:10 PM
"Please strongly consider getting your Dog spayed unless you are fully committed to breeding purebred Puppies from a genetically screened sire, and finding each one the perfect home."

I think a good addition to that would also be:

Please strongly consider getting your Dog NUETERED unless you are fully committed to breeding purebred Puppies from a genetically screened DAM, and finding each one the perfect home.
beaglebrat

Posts: 1371

QUOTE 7/25/2007 9:23:01 PM
WHILE I SUPPORT SPAY AND NEUTERING OF PETS (I wanted to make that very clear) I am NOT in support of early spay/neutering.

Here are some things to consider.

http://www.caninesports.com/SpayNeuter.html

I think RESPONSIBLE PET OWNERS can wait until 9-12 months for the benefit of their pets.

In over 10 years of breeding dogs I have only had ONE (1) bitch come in season before 12 months of age. Many don't come in season until 18 months and a couple even later than that. So, unless people have a toy breed that mature more quickly, I don't see the 'rush' to spay so young when they are MONTHS away from their first heat.

lganio

Posts: 1179

QUOTE 7/25/2007 10:04:03 PM
I had scheduled peanuts spay for eight months because we had just gotten her.she was in her first heat the week of the appointment. I called them and they said for a higher price they would still do it, or I could reschedule. I decided to have it done, but I think it is important to note that a lot of dogs do go into heat before a year of age.
beaglebrat

Posts: 1371

QUOTE 7/25/2007 10:28:03 PM
It probably does have a lot to do with the different breed/size of the puppy in question. But if you are responsible, which any pet/puppy owner should be, then it shouldn't matter even if the dog comes in season.

At times I have owned a stud, and I have never had any accidental breedings, with him when girls were in heat.

It should be easy for people with just a dog or two to keep them contained and safe from sexual activity.

Again, JUST MY OPINION, I am not trying to shove it down people's throats. I just think that BOTH sides of the story should be presented.
thminis

Posts: 1277

QUOTE 7/25/2007 10:43:23 PM

Quote lganio:

I had scheduled peanuts spay for eight months because we had just gotten her.she was in her first heat the week of the appointment. I called them and they said for a higher price they would still do it, or I could reschedule. I decided to have it done, but I think it is important to note that a lot of dogs do go into heat before a year of age.
I've also seen 8 month old dogs go into heat.

thminis

Posts: 1277

QUOTE 7/25/2007 10:45:27 PM

Quote beaglebrat:

It probably does have a lot to do with the different breed/size of the puppy in question. But if you are responsible, which any pet/puppy owner should be, then it shouldn't matter even if the dog comes in season.

At times I have owned a stud, and I have never had any accidental breedings, with him when girls were in heat.

It should be easy for people with just a dog or two to keep them contained and safe from sexual activity.

Again, JUST MY OPINION, I am not trying to shove it down people's throats. I just think that BOTH sides of the story should be presented.
With intact males, it isn't always precautions with females in the household, though. I've seen dogs who were impregnated by a dog like a GSD who jumped his fence and then the female's fence.
vickie123us

Posts: 325

QUOTE 7/25/2007 11:00:51 PM

Quote beaglebrat:

WHILE I SUPPORT SPAY AND NEUTERING OF PETS (I wanted to make that very clear) I am NOT in support of early spay/neutering.

Here are some things to consider.

http://www.caninesports.com/SpayNeuter.html

I think RESPONSIBLE PET OWNERS can wait until 9-12 months for the benefit of their pets.

In over 10 years of breeding dogs I have only had ONE (1) bitch come in season before 12 months of age. Many don't come in season until 18 months and a couple even later than that. So, unless people have a toy breed that mature more quickly, I don't see the 'rush' to spay so young when they are MONTHS away from their first heat.

If this was true i would not be going to dog auctions and dogs that where just a year old. Are being reported as good mothers because already raised a litter of puppies. A lot of things factor on when your dog first heat cycle will be like...The breed and size of the dog. And most importantly the nutrition being feed to the dog.
I personally now has a vet that will spay and neuter the puppies at 8 weeks. and so far we have not had any losses even puppies with heart murmurs. and they are recovered with in a few days.
rescuewench

Posts: 7081

QUOTE 7/25/2007 11:02:48 PM

Quote beaglebrat:

WHILE I SUPPORT SPAY AND NEUTERING OF PETS (I wanted to make that very clear) I am NOT in support of early spay/neutering.

Here are some things to consider.

http://www.caninesports.com/SpayNeuter.html

I think RESPONSIBLE PET OWNERS can wait until 9-12 months for the benefit of their pets.

In over 10 years of breeding dogs I have only had ONE (1) bitch come in season before 12 months of age. Many don't come in season until 18 months and a couple even later than that. So, unless people have a toy breed that mature more quickly, I don't see the 'rush' to spay so young when they are MONTHS away from their first heat.

and why am I NOT surprised....










( OMFGDESS)
rescuewench

Posts: 7081

QUOTE 7/25/2007 11:08:41 PM
http://www.caps-web.org/dr_allen_companion_animal_cancer.php





As veterinarians, we've known for a long time that estrogen is connected with breast cancer. Dogs and cats that are spayed (ovariohysterectomy) before their first heat have a zero incidence of breast cancer later in life. Each year that a female animal goes unspayed increases the likelihood that lumps will develop. Dogs and cats have five pairs of mammary glands, so right away they are five times as likely as humans to develop problems. An unspayed dog is about 70% likely to develop masses in the mammary tissue when they get to be 7 plus years old. Breast cancer in our pets can be prevented through early spaying. Likewise for the males, early neutering prevents testicular cancer.
beaglebrat

Posts: 1371

QUOTE 7/25/2007 11:26:31 PM
Again, I am not disagreeing with spay/neutering. I just don't think it should be done so early.

I AM ENTITLED TO MY OPINION LAST I CHECKED.

I have also heard of female dogs that were spayed early being dropped at shelters because the CONSTANTLY LEAK URINE all over the house.

Again, I have owned many bitches and none have developed pyometra or ANY type of cancer and I own a breed susceptible to cancers of all kinds.

You know if every girl or woman had a COMPLETE HYSTERECTOMY at age 2 months they would be a lot less likely to develop female reproductive cancer too?

Same goes for boys being castrated. I bet they wouldn't develop testicular cancer. Lets all whack them at 2 months too.

Are any of you going to reduce the risk to your children by doing that? No.

There would also be a lot less unwanted pregnancies. Lets do it folks! You all first...lol.


Every one likes to just BLINDLY SAY spay/neuter spay/neuter because those are 'harmless terms'. What you are really doing to these YOUNG BABIES ARE COMPLETE HYSTERECTOMIES and CASTRATION. There can be serious side effects including death.

On another large forum at least once a month some one comes on CRYING that they lost usually a female dog to spaying. And every one is sorry. I am sorry, but they should have also been VERY AWARE that it is a MAJOR SURGERY which also carries grave risks.

rescuewench

Posts: 7081

QUOTE 7/26/2007 12:05:14 AM

Quote beaglebrat:

Again, I am not disagreeing with spay/neutering. I just don't think it should be done so early.

I AM ENTITLED TO MY OPINION LAST I CHECKED.

I have also heard of female dogs that were spayed early being dropped at shelters because the CONSTANTLY LEAK URINE all over the house.

Again, I have owned many bitches and none have developed pyometra or ANY type of cancer and I own a breed susceptible to cancers of all kinds.

You know if every girl or woman had a COMPLETE HYSTERECTOMY at age 2 months they would be a lot less likely to develop female reproductive cancer too?

Same goes for boys being castrated. I bet they wouldn't develop testicular cancer. Lets all whack them at 2 months too.

Are any of you going to reduce the risk to your children by doing that? No.

There would also be a lot less unwanted pregnancies. Lets do it folks! You all first...lol.


Every one likes to just BLINDLY SAY spay/neuter spay/neuter because those are 'harmless terms'. What you are really doing to these YOUNG BABIES ARE COMPLETE HYSTERECTOMIES and CASTRATION. There can be serious side effects including death.

On another large forum at least once a month some one comes on CRYING that they lost usually a female dog to spaying. And every one is sorry. I am sorry, but they should have also been VERY AWARE that it is a MAJOR SURGERY which also carries grave risks.

when you have your PH.D and studied this for some 40 years - i willlisten to your intertnet pup BYB busines OPINION.

until then I WILL LISTEN TO PEOPLE THAT ACTUALLY STUDY THIS RATHER THEN SURVIVE ON TEH RESULTS.

ooopp CAP LOCKED sorry

anyway


xRw
rescuewench

Posts: 7081

QUOTE 7/26/2007 12:10:58 AM


http://www.cfnaonline.com/caninetimes/archive/ct95.html

http://www.macspro.org/spay_neuter.html



http://www.aspca.org/site/PageServer?pagename=adopt_spayneuter


* NOTE to any JQP readimg this,

this info does NOT reflect to BYB'S & puppt millersandthey do NOT condone the truth; such as it is.

XRW
zoesmum

Posts: 286

QUOTE 7/26/2007 12:41:42 AM
Quote: "Are any of you going to reduce the risk to your children by doing that? No."

My kids can't go out at 8 months old, get pregnant and then have 4-8 offspring a couple times per year for life!!!

The argument isn't just regarding the cancers - but that is a GREAT argument. You can't compare children and our pets - just seems a bit ridiculous!
rescuewench

Posts: 7081

QUOTE 7/26/2007 4:02:02 AM

Quote beaglebrat:

Again, I am not disagreeing with spay/neutering. I just don't think it should be done so early.

I AM ENTITLED TO MY OPINION LAST I CHECKED.

I have also heard of female dogs that were spayed early being dropped at shelters because the CONSTANTLY LEAK URINE all over the house.

Again, I have owned many bitches and none have developed pyometra or ANY type of cancer and I own a breed susceptible to cancers of all kinds.

You know if every girl or woman had a COMPLETE HYSTERECTOMY at age 2 months they would be a lot less likely to develop female reproductive cancer too?

Same goes for boys being castrated. I bet they wouldn't develop testicular cancer. Lets all whack them at 2 months too.

Are any of you going to reduce the risk to your children by doing that? No.

There would also be a lot less unwanted pregnancies. Lets do it folks! You all first...lol.


Every one likes to just BLINDLY SAY spay/neuter spay/neuter because those are 'harmless terms'. What you are really doing to these YOUNG BABIES ARE COMPLETE HYSTERECTOMIES and CASTRATION. There can be serious side effects including death.

On another large forum at least once a month some one comes on CRYING that they lost usually a female dog to spaying. And every one is sorry. I am sorry, but they should have also been VERY AWARE that it is a MAJOR SURGERY which also carries grave risks.

just because your "entitled" to yourown OPINION doesnt maketeh sTAICTS DECRESE

but as usual i am sure NONE of teh above bothers you .

i know bingo is addictive.




rescuewench

Posts: 7081

QUOTE 7/26/2007 4:02:52 AM

Quote noskiveez:

"Please strongly consider getting your Dog spayed unless you are fully committed to breeding purebred Puppies from a genetically screened sire, and finding each one the perfect home."

I think a good addition to that would also be:

Please strongly consider getting your Dog NUETERED unless you are fully committed to breeding purebred Puppies from a genetically screened DAM, and finding each one the perfect home.
i posted male stats on a diff thread

here they are:
cont.....
rescuewench

Posts: 7081

QUOTE 7/26/2007 4:08:53 AM
Neutering your male pet eliminates the chances of developing testicular tumors and cancer and greatly decreases the chances of developing prostatic disease, infections and disorders of the prostate glands, perianal tumors, serious types of hernias and infections and disorders of the prepuce.


cont..
rescuewench

Posts: 7081

QUOTE 7/26/2007 4:09:40 AM
Health Benefits
Spaying or neutering your pet eliminates or reduces a wide variety of health problems that can be very difficult and expensive to treat. Females no longer have to go through heat cycles and the health- and behavior-related problems that accompany them. Males are no longer controlled by their hormones, reducing aggressive behavior and the tendency to roam. But most importantly, spaying and neutering eliminates or reduces many types of cancer, tumors and other serious health complications. The simple fact is that altered pets generally live longer, healthier lives.

At the same time, pets that carry harmful genetic traits such as hip dysplasia or epilepsy should be neutered to prevent the spread or continuation of these conditions and others like them.

Fewer Injuries and Infections
Since sterilized animals no longer feel the need to roam to look for a mate, they have less chance of being involved in bloody fights that leave them with scars on their faces or missing parts of their ears and tails. They also avoid traumatic accidents such as being hit by a car. At the same time, the threat of abscesses caused by bites, infections and diseases transmitted by fighting and other contagious diseases are greatly reducedallowing you to avoid expensive veterinary bills.

Fewer Diseases and Other Health Problems
After euthanasia, cancer is the number one killer of cats and dogs. It is very common for veterinarians to see unaltered pets for infections, conditions and diseases that are caused primarily by repeated surges of hormones.

MALES
Statistics prove that neutered males are healthier pets. Many diseases and health problems are caused by the effects of testosterone, a hormone produced in the testicles. By removing the source of testosterone, neutering reduces and eliminates the risks of many cancers and other hormone-related medical conditions. None of the behavioral or medical problems caused by testosterone are rare. Veterinarians deal with them on a daily basis.

Neutering eliminates the chances of developing:
Testicular tumors and cancer. Testicular cancer is the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in older intact male dogs. There are several types of tumors, both benign and malignant, that can arise within the testicles.
rescuewench

Posts: 7081

QUOTE 7/26/2007 4:09:57 AM

Neutering greatly decreases the chances of developing:
Prostatic disease. Over 80% of all unneutered male dogs develop prostate disease.
Infections and disorders of the prostate glands. Prostate conditions such as prostate enlargement, cysts, and infection are all related to the presence of testosterone.
Perianal tumorsThese are tumors whose growth is stimulated by testosterone these are commonly observed in older, unaltered dogs. Perianal gland cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer in older intact male dogs.
Serious types of hernias. These are commonly observed in older, unaltered dogs and can occur on either or both sides of the anus. One of the long-term effects of testosterone causes the group of muscles near the anus to weaken or atrophy. The surgery to repair hernia complications can range from $300 to $1500, depending on the severity.
Infections and disorders of the prepuce (the outer covering of the penis).
rescuewench

Posts: 7081

QUOTE 7/26/2007 4:10:51 AM
all above:

http://www.foxvalleypets.org/dogs/?details=19&page=136
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