THE TRUTH ABOUT HOME RAISED PUPPIES ~MODOG

THE TRUTH ABOUT HOME RAISED PUPPIES ~MODOG

Post Reply



beaglebrat

Posts: 1371

QUOTE 10/13/2009 11:17:57 AM
Sure did-- Here it is:



Hello,




Please contact one of our Regional Offices.
 They can provide you with the most up-to-date and accurate information.
 Here is the contact information



**************************



Which I contacted both regional offices and no reply as of yet. You guys realize though that the only breeders that think every person with over 3 dogs needs to be USDA licensed are coming from Missouri.



That is a line your State and the USDA are feeding you. Maybe it is a Missouri Law, but it is not a Federal Law.



I was just watching Animal Planet last night on Puppymills in Philadelphia PA, they confiscated like 700 dogs from a kennel that was USDA LICENSED.



On that show it said there was another Puppymill in Tennessee that had just as many dogs, but did not need to be USDA licensed because they sold directly to the public via internet.



They said it was a loophole that in over 30 States people were allowed to do this, because they are governed by State and Local Government.



Here in Michigan, I am Regulated by the State, which says I do not have to be USDA licensed if I do not sell to brokers. That is where State involvement ends.



I am Regulated by the county I live in. In Michigan each county has its own kennel rules. I do not have a kennel license, because I choose to license each of my dogs yearly, which costs more, but then I don't have the requirements of keeping my dogs in an outside building---which I don't agree with, and which is the original topic of this conversation.



I also don't have to have a "perimeter fence" around my entire 5 acres of property. I have over 2 acres fenced off, and they wanted me to fence around that-- which is ridiculous.



Bottom line.................Missouri can tell it's breeders what it wants, but that is not what is happening in the rest of the States.


winddial

Posts: 52

QUOTE 10/14/2009 1:02:39 AM
I am from MISSOURI and I know that I DO NOT have to be USDA licensed even though I have 15 dogs so no not everyone from Missouri is under this false assumption.  Missouri also is not feeding anybody a line. It is all spelled out very clear in our State provided regulations.  There are some that think that and think it is gospel, they can believe that if they choose to I geuss. 



3 intact dogs and selling to the public, not brokers you only need a Missouri state license.  I know not everyone believes this but this is what my area inspectors say for both the MDA and USDA and this is what the vets say along with our regulation packet.  If they can't take their words for it, they won't take anybody's word for it.  If anyone wishes to think I am operating out of bounds of the law by not being USDA then you can think that if you want, I am operating according to what my regional authorities say is correct, not what an internet personality has to say. 
beaglebrat

Posts: 1371

QUOTE 10/14/2009 12:22:44 PM
Winddial-- Thank you for that clarification. I just assumed that they may be hearing it from someone official-- or that maybe there were State Rules, that said all breeders with over 3 intact females must be USDA.



USDA licensed to me, is not a good thing--in my experience-- because the United States Department of Agriculture is more about quality control for FOOD LIVESTOCK.



So they are used to the minimum Requirements that need to be met for food Animals. NOT compainion animals.



So the USDA may be fine with keeping a dog in a cage 6 inches longer than it's body, and on wire, like you would keep chickens or rabbits, but I am not alright with that.



The Huge puppymills that get raided and shut down, are mostly USDA licensed.



As someone said on that Puppymill Special, having these inspectors come in is basically like having a housing inspector come in. They are more looking at the conditions of the buildings rather than the humane conditions of the Animals.



I am always going to raise dogs in my house, which I have heard is against USDA licensing--- so I will never be USDA licensed and I don't want to be.

runningridge

Posts: 102

QUOTE 10/14/2009 11:43:54 PM

Quote beaglebrat:

Sure did-- Here it is:



Hello,




Please contact one of our Regional Offices.
 They can provide you with the most up-to-date and accurate information.
 Here is the contact information



**************************



Which I contacted both regional offices and no reply as of yet. You guys realize though that the only breeders that think every person with over 3 dogs needs to be USDA licensed are coming from Missouri.



That is a line your State and the USDA are feeding you. Maybe it is a Missouri Law, but it is not a Federal Law.



I was just watching Animal Planet last night on Puppymills in Philadelphia PA, they confiscated like 700 dogs from a kennel that was USDA LICENSED.



On that show it said there was another Puppymill in Tennessee that had just as many dogs, but did not need to be USDA licensed because they sold directly to the public via internet.



They said it was a loophole that in over 30 States people were allowed to do this, because they are governed by State and Local Government.



Here in Michigan, I am Regulated by the State, which says I do not have to be USDA licensed if I do not sell to brokers. That is where State involvement ends.



I am Regulated by the county I live in. In Michigan each county has its own kennel rules. I do not have a kennel license, because I choose to license each of my dogs yearly, which costs more, but then I don't have the requirements of keeping my dogs in an outside building---which I don't agree with, and which is the original topic of this conversation.



I also don't have to have a "perimeter fence" around my entire 5 acres of property. I have over 2 acres fenced off, and they wanted me to fence around that-- which is ridiculous.



Bottom line.................Missouri can tell it's breeders what it wants, but that is not what is happening in the rest of the States.


Well I'm in Arkansas and not Missouri.   What I posted was FEDERAL law - USDA is FEDERAL.  Your State can supercede but they can not exempt
anybody from FEDERAL law.  Everything I posted I copied and pasted
exactly what the wording was so I'm not choosing to believe anything but
what I read.
  I can't believe that anybody would believe that being USDA licensed or not
makes the difference in the quality of care they furnish to their animals.  There are
good and bad breeders that are USDA and ones that aren't.  There are good and bad breeders that raise dogs in their home or in their backyard.   I could say that everybody that protest so much are the ones we all need to watch out for as over the years I've seen those that are judging others the most are the ones that end
up getting their dogs confiscated.  Kind of like point the fingers at others to take the focus off of themselves.  BUTTTTT ... I know that would be unfair as there are still good breeders out there that are just judgemental.  Guess there has to

be all kinds so we can appreciate the better ones.

Bottom line being ..... Most States have their SEPARATE Kennel Laws but

EVERY STATE is still bound by the USDA FEDERAL LAWS.

runningridge

Posts: 102

QUOTE 10/14/2009 11:52:18 PM
What those Federal Laws are, I can only contend are confusing as we all seem to

have our own theory and it seems the USDA prefers to not say.  Maybe they

are as confused as the rest of us! lol!
runningridge

Posts: 102

QUOTE 10/15/2009 3:25:32 PM

Quote c-lane:

gomodog....



I went to your website and watched your video. I must say you really look like nothing more then a high class "Puppy Mill". What I saw is nothing to be proud of. You speak on your "about us" page of church and yet in a single breath you accuse Beaglebrat of being a playboy webpage, not very Christan like now is that? In all honesty it really only sounds like your trying your best to sell or promote your product. If you feel your facility is the best then so be it but dont see here and start stuff with other breeders and accuse them of things just to make your self look good. Ive had a Purebred from a facility like yours and he died at age 4 thanks to the "so called" quality care people like you give them. I would rather buy from a home breeder and infact I am a home breeder and my home is clean and sanitary. So you just keep your facility and run it how you see fit and leave us home/hobby breeders alone and in the end will truly see who is still standing!! Oh and by the way, how many show pups have you produced that is actually wining in the ring? I guarantee you everyone who has replied to your garbage has puppies in the show ring and loving every bit of it. Good Day!
Is "Judging" somebody a sin?  Do you consider "Deragotary Statements" being a sin?  I believe the verse in common Language is "Let thee with no sin cast the first stone".

  I also have another one that I dearly love  


Great minds discuss ideas:



Average minds discuss events:



Small minds discuss people.



                            ~ Elanor Roosevelt



runningridge

Posts: 102

QUOTE 10/15/2009 6:07:07 PM
Michigan Laws I found































Section 287.261





DOG LAW OF 1919 (EXCERPT)

Act 339 of 1919








287.261 Short title; definitions.

Sec. 1.

(1) This act shall be known and may be cited as the “dog law of 1919”.

(2) For the purpose of this act:

(a) “Livestock” means horses, stallions, colts, geldings, mares, sheep, rams, lambs, bulls, bullocks, steers, heifers, cows, calves, mules, jacks, jennets, burros, goats, kids and swine, and fur-bearing animals being raised in captivity.

(b) “Poultry” means all domestic fowl, ornamental birds, and game birds possessed or being reared under authority of a breeder's license pursuant to part 427 (breeders and dealers) of the natural resources and environmental protection act, Act No. 451 of the Public Acts of 1994, being sections 324.42701 to 324.42714 of the Michigan Compiled Laws.

(c) “Owner” when applied to the proprietorship of a dog means every person having a right of property in the dog, and every person who keeps or harbors the dog or has it in his care, and every person who permits the dog to remain on or about any premises occupied by him.

(d) “Kennel” means any establishment wherein or whereon dogs are kept for the purpose of breeding, sale, or sporting purposes.

(e) “Law enforcement officer” means any person employed or elected by the people of the state, or by any municipality, county, or township, whose duty it is to preserve peace or to make arrests or to enforce the law, and includes conservation officers and members of the state police.

(f) “Hunting” means allowing a dog to range freely within sight or sound of its owner while in the course of hunting legal game or an unprotected animal.



History: 1919, Act 339, Eff. Aug. 14, 1919 ;-- CL 1929, 5245 ;-- CL 1948, 287.261 ;-- Am. 1959, Act 42, Eff. Mar. 19, 1960 ;-- Am. 1973, Act 32, Imd. Eff. June 14, 1973 ;-- Am. 1996, Act 63, Imd. Eff. Feb. 26, 1996








 














Kennel                From Michigan.gov

 






Required State License(s):

When selling or offering for sale any species of animals a license is required* with the Department of Agriculture, Animal Industry Division; (517) 373-1077. WHEN BOARDING ANIMALS ONLY, A STATE LICENSE IS NOT REQUIRED.

Other Possible License(s):

A kennel license may be required by the county animal control office or local animal shelter.

A sales tax license is required depending on the type of products sold, whether from the home or at a retail establishment. You may call the Michigan Department of Treasury at (517) 636-4660.

Personalized sales tax returns and a payment schedule will be mailed to you about four to six weeks after your registration is processed. If you have questions about this process, please call the Michigan Department of Treasury at (517) 636-4730.

 




* Kennel licensing is regulated locally.  The Michigan Department of Agriculture (MDA) has authorized local animal control officers, chiefs of police, or sheriffs' departments to act in the MDA director's name in conducting kennel inspections and signing off on the inspection certificates.  MDA therefore advises people wishing to license a kennel to contact their local animal control to arrange for an animal control officer to conduct an inspection of facilities to determine if they meet the requirements of a kennel.



Below you will find links to the law and regulation regarding kennels.








DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE



                          ANIMAL INDUSTRY DIVISION



                      REGULATION NO. 129. DOG KENNELS





(By authority of section 10 of Act No. 339 of the Public Acts  of  1939,   as

amended, being S287.270 of the Michigan Compiled Laws)





R  285.129.1   Dog kennels.

  Rule 1. (1) The following rule is hereby established to  be  effective   on

and after April 22, 1946:

  (a) Any dog kennel which under Michigan state law is to be  covered  by   a

license shall be of such construction as will  adequately   and   comfortably

house any dogs kept therein at any season  of  the   year.   The   buildings,

including walls and floors, shall be of such construction as  to  be  readily

cleaned, and kennels and yards connected therewith used  to  confine   kennel

dogs shall be kept cleaned and free from accumulation of  filth,   mud,   and

debris.

  (b) All dogs kept or maintained in connection with such  kennels  shall  be

furnished with a clean, fresh water supply and adequate and  proper  food  to

maintain such animals in a normal condition of health.

  (c) The necessary inspections to be made under this   rule   to   determine

whether the same has been complied with shall be made by the  dog  warden, if

there be one, otherwise by such person as may be appointed by  the  board  of

supervisors or the legislative body of the government unit  involved.  If  no

such appointment is made and in effect in any county, city, or village,  then

such inspection shall  be   made   on   behalf   of   the   commissioner   of

agriculture by the sheriff or chief of police.

  (d) In all cases, upon such inspection being satisfactory, a certificate of

inspection  shall  be  signed  by   such   inspector   on   behalf   of   the

commissioner of agriculture as required by the act.

  (2) The provisions of this rule shall not be effective in  the  counties of

this state that are operating under the provisions of section 16 of  Act  No.

79 of the Public Acts of 1933, being S287.276 of the Michigan Compiled  Laws,

wherein the board of supervisors have appointed a  county  dog   warden  with

certain powers and duties, unless such counties by a resolution  duly adopted

by the board of supervisors accept the provisions of  Act   No.  245  of  the

Public Acts of  1945,  being  S287.261  et  seq.  of  the  Michigan  Compiled

Laws.



  History:  1979 AC.



 




 

From Kalamazoo Website



























A Kennel as defined by the Michigan Department of Agriculture Regulation No. 129 governing Dog Kennels is an establishment where the owner keeps three (3) or more dogs and does so for sale, boarding, breeding, or training.  The law requires the following requirements to obtain a Kennel License in the State of Michigan;









  1. Any dog kennel that is to be covered by a Michigan State Kennel License, must be constructed in such a manner that any dog(s) housed there will be adequately and comfortably kept in any season of the year.








  2. The buildings, including the walls and floors, must be of such construction that it can be easily cleaned and sanitized.  Any kennels or yards that are connected or are used to confine the kennel dogs, must be kept clean and free from accumulations of feces, filth, mud and debris.







  3. Every dog kept or maintained in the kennel or connected to the kennel, shall have constant access to a clean, fresh, water supply.  The dog(s) must also have an adequate amount of proper food to maintain the dog(s) in a normal condition of health.







  4. The kennel dogs must not be allowed to stray beyond the enclosed premises of the kennel, and must be kept in such a way that prevents the public or stray animals from obtaining entrance into or gaining contact with any dog(s) lodged at the kennel.







  5. Every dog in the kennel must have a kennel tag (dog license) attached to their collar at all times if they are four (4) months of age or older.



































    DOG LAW OF 1919 (EXCERPT)

    Act 339 of 1919








    287.270 “Kennel” defined; kennel license; fee; tags; certificate; rules; inspection; exception.

     

    Sec. 10.

    For the purposes of this act, a kennel shall be construed as an establishment wherein or whereon 3 or more dogs are confined and kept for sale, boarding, breeding or training purposes, for remuneration, and a kennel facility shall be so constructed as to prevent the public or stray dogs from obtaining entrance thereto and gaining contact with dogs lodged in the kennel. Any person who keeps or operates a kennel may, in lieu of individual license required under this act, apply to the county treasurer for a kennel license entitling him to keep or operate a kennel. Proof of vaccination of dogs against rabies shall not be required with the application. The license shall be issued by the county treasurer on a form prepared and supplied by the director of the department of agriculture, and shall entitle the licensee to keep any number of dogs 6 months old or over not at any time exceeding a certain number to be specified in the license. The fee to be paid for a kennel license shall be $10.00 for 10 dogs or less, and $25.00 for more than 10 dogs. A fee of double the original license fee shall be charged for each previously licensed kennel, whose kennel license is applied for after June 1. With each kennel license the county treasurer shall issue a number of metal tags equal to the number of dogs authorized to be kept in the kennel. All the tags shall bear the name of the county issuing it, the number of the kennel license, and shall be readily distinguishable from the individual license tags for the same year.

    The county treasurer or county animal control officer shall not issue a kennel license for a new kennel under the provisions of this act unless the applicant furnishes an inspection certificate signed by the director of the department of agriculture, or his authorized representative, stating that the kennel to be covered by the license complies with the reasonable sanitary requirements of the department of agriculture, and that the dogs therein are properly fed and protected from exposure commensurate with the breed of the dog. The director of the department of agriculture shall promulgate reasonable rules with respect to the inspections in the manner prescribed by law. The inspection shall be made not more than 30 days before filing the application for license. The provisions of this act shall not be effective in the counties of this state that are operating under the provisions of section 16 wherein the board of supervisors have appointed a county animal control officer with certain powers and duties, unless the counties by a resolution duly adopted by the board of supervisors accept the provisions of this act.



    History: 1919, Act 339, Eff. Aug. 14, 1919 ;-- Am. 1925, Act 322, Eff. Aug. 27, 1925 ;-- CL 1929, 5254 ;-- Am. 1933, Act 79, Imd. Eff. May 19, 1933 ;-- Am. 1945, Act 245, Eff. Sept. 6, 1945 ;-- CL 1948, 287.270 ;-- Am. 1953, Act 172, Imd. Eff. June 4, 1953 ;-- Am. 1969, Act 195, Eff. Mar. 20, 1970 ;-- Am. 1972, Act 349, Imd. Eff. Jan. 9, 1973

    Admin Rule: R 285.129.1 of the Michigan Administrative Code.



     2009 Legislative Council, State of Michigan

     









     


































    Section 287.271





    DOG LAW OF 1919 (EXCERPT)

    Act 339 of 1919








    287.271 Rules governing kennel dogs.

     

    Sec. 11.

    The licensee of a kennel shall, at all times, keep 1 of such tags attached to a collar on each dog 4 months old or over kept by him under a kennel license. No dog bearing a kennel tag shall be permitted to stray or be taken anywhere outside the limits of the kennel. This section does not prohibit the taking of dogs having a kennel license outside the limits of the kennel temporarily and in leash, nor does it prohibit the taking of such dogs out of the kennel temporarily for the purpose of hunting, breeding, trial or show.



    History: 1919, Act 339, Eff. Aug. 14, 1919 ;-- CL 1929, 5255 ;-- CL 1948, 287.271




































    Section 287.277





    DOG LAW OF 1919 (EXCERPT)

    Act 339 of 1919








    287.277 Identification and location of unlicensed dogs; public nuisance; list; commencement of proceedings; duties of sheriff; nonfeasance in office.

     

    Sec. 17.

    The county treasurer may, based on records of the dogs actually licensed in each city or township of the county and any report under section 16, identify and locate all unlicensed dogs. If a dog is required to be licensed under this act but is unlicensed, the dog is a public nuisance. The county treasurer shall immediately list all unlicensed dogs identified by this section and shall deliver copies of the list to the prosecuting attorney of the county and to the director of the department of agriculture. On receiving from the county treasurer the name of any owner of an unlicensed dog, the prosecuting attorney shall at once commence the necessary proceedings against the owner of the dog, as required by this act. The sheriff shall locate and kill, or cause to be killed, all such unlicensed dogs. Failure, refusal, or neglect on the part of a sheriff to carry out the provisions of this section constitutes nonfeasance in office.



    History: 1919, Act 339, Eff. Aug. 14, 1919 ;-- Am. 1925, Act 322, Eff. Aug. 27, 1925 ;-- CL 1929, 5261 ;-- Am. 1933, Act 79, Imd. Eff. May 19, 1933 ;-- CL 1948, 287.277 ;-- Am. 1967, Act 197, Eff. Nov. 2, 1967 ;-- Am. 1968, Act 38, Eff. Jan. 1, 1969 ;-- Am. 1972, Act 349, Imd. Eff. Jan. 9, 1973 ;-- Am. 1998, Act 390, Imd. Eff. Nov. 30, 1998



    2009 Legislative Council, State of Michigan

     




































    Section 287.275





    DOG LAW OF 1919 (EXCERPT)

    Act 339 of 1919








    287.275 County treasurer's record; inspection.

     

    Sec. 15.

    The county treasurer shall keep a record of all dog licenses, and all kennel licenses, issued during the year in each city and township in his or her county. Such record shall contain the name and address of the person to whom each license is issued and the expiration date of each license. For an individual license, the record shall also state the breed, sex, age, color, and markings of the dog licensed; and for a kennel license, it shall state the place where the business is conducted. The record is a public record and shall be open to inspection during business hours. The county treasurer shall also keep an accurate record of all license fees collected by the county treasurer or paid over to him or her by any city or township treasurer.



    History: 1919, Act 339, Eff. Aug. 14, 1919 ;-- CL 1929, 5259 ;-- CL 1948, 287.275 ;-- Am. 1998, Act 390, Imd. Eff. Nov. 30, 1998



    2009 Legislative Council, State of Michigan

     




































    Section 287.264





    DOG LAW OF 1919 (EXCERPT)

    Act 339 of 1919








    287.264 Supervision and enforcement.

     

    Sec. 4.

    The state livestock sanitary commission shall have the general supervision over the licensing and regulation of dogs and the protection of livestock and poultry from dogs, and may employ all proper means for the enforcement of this act and all police officers of the state, county, municipality or township shall be at its disposal for that purpose. An animal control officer or a law enforcement officer of the state shall issue a citation, summons or appearance ticket for a violation of this act.



    History: 1919, Act 339, Eff. Aug. 14, 1919 ;-- CL 1929, 5248 ;-- CL 1948, 287.264 ;-- Am. 1969, Act 195, Eff. Mar. 20, 1970 ;-- Am. 1972, Act 349, Imd. Eff. Jan. 9, 1973



     




































    Section 287.262





    DOG LAW OF 1919 (EXCERPT)

    Act 339 of 1919








    287.262 Dogs; licensing, tags, leashes.

     

    Sec. 2.

    It shall be unlawful for any person to own any dog 6 months old or over, unless the dog is licensed as hereinafter provided, or to own any dog 6 months old or over that does not at all times wear a collar with a tag approved by the director of agriculture, attached as hereinafter provided, except when engaged in lawful hunting accompanied by its owner or custodian; or for any owner of any female dog to permit the female dog to go beyond the premises of such owner when she is in heat, unless the female dog is held properly in leash; or for any person except the owner or authorized agent, to remove any license tag from a dog; or for any owner to allow any dog, except working dogs such as leader dogs, guard dogs, farm dogs, hunting dogs, and other such dogs, when accompanied by their owner or his authorized agent, while actively engaged in activities for which such dogs are trained, to stray unless held properly in leash.



    History: 1919, Act 339, Eff. Aug. 14, 1919 ;-- Am. 1925, Act 322, Eff. Aug. 27, 1925 ;-- CL 1929, 5246 ;-- CL 1948, 287.262 ;-- Am. 1951, Act 173, Imd. Eff. June 8, 1951 ;-- Am. 1969, Act 195, Eff. Mar. 20, 1970



     






















    Found on Calhoun County's site



    Please note that the way I read it it states that IN LIEU of INDIVIDUAL Dog licenses that a kennel can apply for a KENNEL License but no where do I see that you can license each individual dog in lieu of a State Required Kennel License.



    ARTICLE 5

    DOG LICENSING


     

    Section 5.1

    It shall be required that any dog four (4) months of age or older shall be licensed.


    Section 5.2



    On or before February 28 of each year, the owner of any dog four (4) months old or over shall apply to the County, Township, or City Treasurer, or his authorized agent where the owner resides, in writing for a license for each dog owned or kept by him. Such application shall state the breed, sex, age, color, and markings of such dog and the name and address of the last previous owner. Such application for a license shall be accompanied by proof of a valid certificate of vaccination for rabies, with a vaccine licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture, signed by an accredited veterinarian.



    Section.5.3



    The owner shall provide every licensed dog with a collar, to which a license tag approved by the Michigan Department of Agriculture shall be securely attached and displayed on animal at all times, except when the dog is engaged in lawful hunting and accompanied by its owner.



    Section 5.4



    If an owner elects not to affix a license and collar to his or her animal, the owner assumes the risk that the animal control officer, in fulfilling his duties under the ordinance, will regard the animal as feral, abandoned, or unlicensed and therefore subject to seizure and disposition in accordance with this ordinance.



    Section 5.5



    The license and license tag are assigned to the dog and are not transferable to another dog. They shall remain with the dog upon transfer to another owner within Calhoun County. The last registered owner shall notify the Calhoun County Treasurer’s Office so that it may note such transfer upon its records. This Ordinance does not require the procurement of a new license, or the transfer of a license already secured, when the possession of a dog is temporarily transferred, for the purpose of hunting game or for breeding, trial, or show, in the State of Michigan.



    Section 5.6



    A dog displaying a license tag from another Michigan county shall not require licensing in Calhoun County until expiration of the current license, provided that the dog remains in the possession of the owner to whom the license was issued



    Section 5.7



    If the Calhoun County dog license tag is lost it shall be replaced for a minimal fee not to exceed four dollars ($4) by the Calhoun County Treasurer’s Office upon application by the owner of the dog, and upon production of such license and a signed statement of the fact regarding the loss of such tag



    Section 5.8



    Fees shall be waived for licenses issued for any service dog upon presentation of an affidavit by the dog's owner. The waiver shall apply to all subsequent licenses issued to that dog so long as it remains the property of the person named in the affidavit.



    Section 5.9



    A penalty equal to twice the applicable license fee shall be charged to any person who fails to apply for an initial license or a renewal license on or before February 28.



    Section 5.10



    No dog shall be exempt from the rabies vaccination requirements set forth in this Ordinance, unless there is a valid medical reason supplied in writing by a licensed veterinarian. A titre test must be performed on the exempt dog, that proves the dogs titre is sufficient to adequately protect against the rabies virus. The veterinarian performing the titre test must put into writing the results of the test, which will be accompanied by a copy of the titre test results. The titre test must be done each year on the exempt dog before a current license will be issued. If the exempt dogs titre is not sufficient to protect the dog from the rabies virus the dog will be required to have a rabies vaccination or be euthanized. All cost incurred will be paid by the owner of the dog.



    Section 5.11



    No owner shall purchase a license for a dog at the sterilized price unless the dog is sterilized, or a written statement from a licensed veterinarian states the animal is sterile or for medical reasons cannot undergo the sterilization procedure.



    Section 5.12



    Fees are to be set by the Calhoun County Board of Commissioners, under the guidelines of the State statutes.



    Section 5.13



    Any dog not licensed or wearing a current license may be seized by an Animal Control Officer and held at the Animal Shelter. Upon termination of dogs' and other animal’s statutory holding periods, dogs and other animals become the property of the Animal Control Department for purposes of disposal of the dogs and other animals placed for holding at the Shelter.



    Section 5.14



    None of the provisions of this Ordinance shall be construed as requiring the licensing of any dog imported into Calhoun County from outside the State for a period not to exceed thirty (30) days for show, trial, breeding or hunting purposes.



    Section 5.15



    Leader / seeing eye / service dogs shall be exempt from a dog license and license fee except said dog shall be registered by completion of all licensing forms and procedures and issuance of a free tag.



    ARTICLE 6

    KENNEL LICENSING



    Section 6.1



    Any person who owns, keeps, or operates a kennel may, in lieu of individual licenses required for dogs under this Ordinance and under the statutes of the State of Michigan, apply to the County Treasurer for a kennel license entitling that person to own, keep or operate such kennel in accordance with applicable laws of the State. The dogs in the kennel covered by the kennel license must be kept for sale, boarding, breeding. training or sporting purposes for remuneration. Pets must be licensed individually and will not be covered under the kennel license. All kennel licenses shall run from April 1 until March 30 of the following year.



    Section 6.2



    In order to obtain a kennel license, any person who owns. keeps or operates a kennel at any single location within the boundaries of Calhoun County except in cities, villages, or townships with their own animal control agency, shall, within thirty (30) calendar days prior to the start of such operation, or within thirty (30) calendar days prior to the expiration date of a previously issued license, obtain a kennel license from the County Treasurer’s Office, which shall issue such license if the kennel is in compliance with Sections 10 and 11 of Act 339 of the Public Acts of 1919, as amended, being Sections 287.270 and 287.271 of the Michigan Compiled Laws of 1948 (MSA 12.520 and 12.521), and with any applicable ordinance of the city, village or township in which it is located. The County Treasurer will not issue a kennel license to any person who has been denied a kennel license by the city, village or township where they reside.



    Section 6.3



    Failure to obtain a kennel license by April 1st will result in a doubling of the applicable fee and all dogs possessed on the grounds will be considered unlicensed dogs.



    Section 6.4



    The Animal Control Officer shall have the right to Inspect any kennel in the County of Calhoun in order to determine whether said kennel is in compliance with this Ordinance and the State statute. If the kennel his been issued a license, it shall be the duty of the Animal Control Officer to suspend said license if, in the Officer's opinion, conditions exist which are unhealthy or inhumane to the animals kept therein pending correction of such conditions, and further shall have the duty to revoke said license if such conditions are not corrected within a designated reasonable time.



    Section 6.5



    All licensed kennels shall be required to have double fencing and a secured flooring. The fence on the outer perimeter shall be constructed in such a manner as to prevent stray animals and people from making direct contact with kennel animals. The flooring shall be constructed in such a manner as to prevent animals digging out of the enclosure. Exceptions: 1) solid fence and 2) animals kept inside.



    Section 6.6



    All dogs kept under a kennel licenses shall be confined by enclosure as described in Section 6.5, not by tether.



    Section 6.7



    Any dog kennel which under Michigan State law is to be covered by a license shall be of such construction as will adequately and comfortably house any dogs kept therein during any season of the year. The buildings, including walls and floor, shall be of such construction as to be readily cleaned and kennels and yards connected therewith used to confine kennel dogs shall be kept clean and free from accumulation of filth and debris.



    Section 6.8



    All dogs kept or maintained in connection with such kennels shall be furnished with a clean, fresh water supply and adequate and proper food to maintain such animals in a state of good health.



    Section 6.9



    Any kennel dog four (4) months old or older must possess a valid rabies vaccination before a current kennel license shall be issued.








     

































    Kennel Rules and Policy



    Newaygo County




































    A kennel license may be issued to any person operating a dog kennel in accordance to MCLA 287.270 and Newaygo County Dog Ordinance No. 01/1999, Adopted June 9, 1999 and Amended September 12, 2001.





     




    Definition of a Kennel:  Shall mean any establishment wherein three or more dogs are confined and kept for sale, boarding, breeding or training purposes, for remuneration, and a kennel facility shall be so constructed as to prevent the public or stray dogs from obtaining entrance thereto and gaining contact with dogs lodged in the kennel.

     




    Kennel License:  Apply to the county treasurer for a kennel license entitling him to keep or operate a kennel.  Proof of vaccination of dogs against rabies shall not be required with the application.  The license shall be issued by the county treasurer on a form prepared and supplied by the director of the department of agriculture, and shall entitle the licensee to keep any number of dogs 4 months old or over not at any time exceeding a certain number to be specified in the license.



    Inspection:  Each kennel shall be inspected prior to the issuance of a kennel license to insure proper sanitation and that the kennel will not violate any law or ordinance of the County of Newaygo, or any law of the State of Michigan, or constitute a menace to the health, peace, or safety of the community. (R 285.129 Regulation No. 129 Governing Dog Kennels)

     



    Fees:  A License and Inspection fee will be charged for each kennel application.



    License fees



















    4-10 Dogs




    11-20 Dogs




    20+ Dogs




    Boarding Dogs




    $10.00




    $25.00




    $25.00




    $30.00




    A fee of double the original license fee shall be charged for each previously licensed kennel, whose kennel license is applied for after June 1.
    Inspection fees:
















    4-10 Dogs




    11-20 Dogs




    20+ Dogs




    $40.00




    $75.00




    $125.00




     




    Rabies Vaccination:  Before any dog may be licensed, the dog owner must provide proof of vaccination of the dog for rabies by a valid certificate of vaccination for rabies with a vaccine licensed by the United States Department of Agriculture signed by an accredited veterinarian or the kennel owner. 

     



    Display of License:  Every person having a kennel license shall keep the license exhibited in a conspicuous manner in the kennel.






    With each kennel license the County Treasurer shall issue a number of metal tags equal to the number of dogs authorized to be kept in the kennel.  All the tags shall bear the name of the county issuing it, the number of the kennel license, and shall be readily distinguishable from the individual license tags for the same year.

     



























































































    Cass County, Michigan

    Section 2.5

    KENNEL

    The term “Kennel” shall mean any establishment wherein or whereon dogs are kept for the purpose of breeding, boarding, sale, leasing, trading or sporting purposes, however, does not include those establishments required under State law to be licensed as an animal protection agency, pursuant to MCLA 287.331.











     

    ARTICLE IV

    LICENSING AND VACCINATION

    It shall be unlawful for any person to own or possess or harbor any dog four (4)months old or older, unless such dog is licensed as provided for by the laws of the State of Michigan and this ordinance, or to own, possess or harbor any dog four (4)months old or older that does not at all times wear a collar with a tag approved by the Director of the Department of Agriculture, securely attached to such collar.  Application for such license shall be made in accordance with the applicable laws of the State of Michigan and shall be accompanied by proof of vaccination of the dog for rabies.  Fees for dog licenses shall be established by resolution of the Cass County Board of Commissioners.

    Section 4.2

    (a) KENNEL LICENSE. Any person who keeps or operates a kennel may, in lieu of individual licenses required under this ordinance and under the laws of the State of Michigan, apply to the County Treasurer for a kennel license entitling him to keep or operate such kennel in accordance with the applicable laws of the State of Michigan; all kennels must be inspected and approved in writing under rules promulgated by the Animal Control Department annually on or before March 1 of each year hereafter. Each new request for a kennel license shall be accompanied by a written statement of approval directed to the Animal Control Director, from the zoning board of the village, township or city in which the kennel shall be located, or, if no such board exists, by the village council, township board or city council in which the kennel shall be located.

    Fees for kennel licenses and other required inspections shall be established resolution by the Board of Commissioners.







     










     



    Section 7. Any person who owns, keeps or operates a kennel shall on or before March 31 of the year following such ownership obtain a kennel license from the Treasurer and shall be subject to the following rules:






    (a) Any such person who maintains animals in such a way that they would be deemed a kennel, defined here in, in lieu of individual licenses required under this Ordinance, on or before March 31 of each year, apply to the Animal Control Officer for a kennel license entitling and requiring such person to own, keep or operate such kennel in accordance with the provisions of this ordinance and the applicable statues of the State, including Section 10 of Act 339, Public Acts of 1919, as amended, being MCLA 287.270; MSA 12520.



    KENNEL. Any establishment or premise, except a pet shop, animal shelter, veterinary clinic or pound licensed pursuant to Act 287 of the Michigan Public Acts of 1969, as amended, being MCLA 287.331-340; MSA 12.481 (101)-(110), wherein or whereon four (4) or more Dogs are confined and kept for sale, breeding or training purposes, for remuneration or any owner who maintains (4) or more dogs and elects to be deemed a kennel for licensing purposes pursuant to the provisions of Article IV section 7 (a) herein.



    DOG. Any member of the animal species Canis Familiaris, four (4) months or older in age.







    Jackson County

    "Kennel"




    means any facility, except a duly licensed pet shop, where three (3) or more dogs are kept for breeding, sale, sporting, boarding or training purposes, for remuneration.



    "Dog"




    means an animal of any age solely of the species Canis Familaris or Canis Lupus Familiaris.




    ARTICLE 6



    KENNEL LICENSING


    Section 6.1


    Any person who owns, keeps or operates a kennel may, in lieu of individual licenses required for dogs under this Ordinance and under the Statutes of the State of Michigan apply to the County Treasurer’s Office or Animal Control for a kennel license entitling that person to own, keep or operate such kennel in accordance with applicable Laws of the State.








    I could go on and on and on like the Energizer Bunny and I'm sure there are some out there slightly different than the ones I've



    posted but so far I haven't seen any with major changes or ones that allow you to Individually License instead of Kennel License.



    If somebody knows of such please advise so we can post that as well.



    All allowed Kennel License in lieu of Individual License.   I did notice that ALL required Double Fencing for Kennel Licensing. 




    I called 2 to clarify what "UTILITY" means as most had a "PET" clarification and it said for PLEASURE and not



    UTILITY.  I was told by both that "PET" meant NON-BREEDING or Altered.  I was also told that if you had more than the ALLOWED number



    of PETS that you could apply for a KENNEL License in order to keep those excessive PETS. 




    On another VERY IMPORTANT NOTE for Michigan ... CONGRATS ... I believe your Representative either has or is expected to withdraw  submitted HB6395.   That bill would of severely hampered "DOG OWNERS" period throughout Michigan.














    beaglebrat

    Posts: 1371

    QUOTE 10/16/2009 7:45:43 AM LOL, you actually highlighted it. In Lieu of means "instead of....".



    any person who owns, keeps, or operates a kennel may, in lieu of individual licenses



    They don't care if you have 100 dogs, as long as you don't have any complaints about their care-- and as long as they are current on Rabies Vaccinations, which is required to license them. Other than that, if you want to pay per dog, you are good. Which I am good.



    Instead of paying $50 per year for a kennel license I pay $250-300 per year to do each dog individually.



    I am fine with that, and the County is fine with that. They are
    getting  5-6 times the money from me, and I don't care. I am not
    subjected to any rules, regulations, I am still a private residence
    instead of a kennel.



    As I said, it is county by county Regulations. You could probably post all 81 counties and how they interpret the laws would be a little bit different. I am well aware that some counties are more "breeder friendly" than others. I could never have as many dogs as I have in some more "urban" counties.



    Everyone is aware of how many dogs I have. When I have 8-10 Boxers running/playing in a 2 acre field on a hill, we have people stopping all the time. We are a landmark. People who don't know us, know who we are.



    I have friends in different counties and there are different kennel rules. I did not like the rule about the double fencing, so I was given a choice to license each dog  individually to get around the licensing requirements.



    So as long as the County is fine, and the State does not have a set licensing law I am 100% fine at this point.



    As far as Dog breeding Laws are concerned, some one had a crappy law that they were trying to pass 2 years ago that went down in a hurry. Dog breeders are one of the only things doing well in a State with almost 15% unemployment rate.



    I am still producing a great product here in Michigan. You can't say that about the Auto and Appliance industries.



    Every Dog breeder in Every State needs to watch out for HSUS--the new more effective PETA. Or no one will be breeding dogs, and I have thought about that too.



    I live 2 hours from Canada and if I can't raise dogs in the United States--- THE LAND OF THE USED TO BE FREE--- I will go live in Canada, and make the 10 minute Bridge drive over and still sell puppies in the USA.



    At least in Canada I would get to have Health Care. So Bring It On HSUS. Every dog breeder from Hobby to Commercial better be supporting the Anti-HSUS Organizations. I donate when I can.

    katiekat33

    Posts: 53

    QUOTE 10/16/2009 5:14:11 PM Beagle, you and I are in complete agreement on HSUS - if people only knew how dangerous they are! 
    dihart

    Posts: 322

    QUOTE 10/16/2009 5:42:01 PM ME TOO! Most people think of the hard working animal loving local shelter workers when they hear "Humane Society", and when they are sending their monthly donations to them in hopes of supporting animals in crisis. Little do they realize that out of their billion $$ yearly buget, only about 7% is given to the local shelters and the remaining is used to further lobbying efforts and smear campains against breeders and livestock farmers of all kinds. Look HSUS up on the internet and you never hear a whisper about that.
    runningridge

    Posts: 102

    QUOTE 10/17/2009 10:27:15 AM

    Quote beaglebrat:

    LOL, you actually highlighted it. In Lieu of means "instead of....".



    any person who owns, keeps, or operates a kennel may, in lieu of individual licenses



    They don't care if you have 100 dogs, as long as you don't have any complaints about their care-- and as long as they are current on Rabies Vaccinations, which is required to license them. Other than that, if you want to pay per dog, you are good. Which I am good.



    Instead of paying $50 per year for a kennel license I pay $250-300 per year to do each dog individually.



    I am fine with that, and the County is fine with that. They are
    getting  5-6 times the money from me, and I don't care. I am not
    subjected to any rules, regulations, I am still a private residence
    instead of a kennel.



    As I said, it is county by county Regulations. You could probably post all 81 counties and how they interpret the laws would be a little bit different. I am well aware that some counties are more "breeder friendly" than others. I could never have as many dogs as I have in some more "urban" counties.



    Everyone is aware of how many dogs I have. When I have 8-10 Boxers running/playing in a 2 acre field on a hill, we have people stopping all the time. We are a landmark. People who don't know us, know who we are.



    I have friends in different counties and there are different kennel rules. I did not like the rule about the double fencing, so I was given a choice to license each dog  individually to get around the licensing requirements.



    So as long as the County is fine, and the State does not have a set licensing law I am 100% fine at this point.



    As far as Dog breeding Laws are concerned, some one had a crappy law that they were trying to pass 2 years ago that went down in a hurry. Dog breeders are one of the only things doing well in a State with almost 15% unemployment rate.



    I am still producing a great product here in Michigan. You can't say that about the Auto and Appliance industries.



    Every Dog breeder in Every State needs to watch out for HSUS--the new more effective PETA. Or no one will be breeding dogs, and I have thought about that too.



    I live 2 hours from Canada and if I can't raise dogs in the United States--- THE LAND OF THE USED TO BE FREE--- I will go live in Canada, and make the 10 minute Bridge drive over and still sell puppies in the USA.



    At least in Canada I would get to have Health Care. So Bring It On HSUS. Every dog breeder from Hobby to Commercial better be supporting the Anti-HSUS Organizations. I donate when I can.

    LOL!  I did highlight it just so that it was very visible as it states that you can purchase a KENNEL LICENSE in lieu (*INSTEAD) of Individual License but NOWHERE did it state you could buy INDIVIDUAL License instead of the kennel license.  The Kennel License is REQUIRED for anybody with 3 or more

    breeding females.  There is that dang 3 or more term again.

    Michigan State does have required laws and I posted some of those as well. 

    Michigan relies on local authorities to enforce their policies.  If your county isn't doing it then your still not exempt from being expected to know the law and

    abide by it.  Should those wonderful guys and gals that don't believe in breeding

    ever grace your door, I can assure you they will be quite happy that you aren't abiding by the law as for every one you are breaking, they will be more than happy to point it out in a court of law. 

    I personally think that the laws are for the most part NOT in the best interest of dogs or the folks breeding them but unfortunately nobody cares what I think.

    Before you jump the line into Canada you might want to check out their Dog Laws.  They are a lot more strict than here in the U.S. and are more strictly enforced.  The HSUS and PETA are alive and well in Canada as well.

    PETA and HSUS also have gone abroad as well.  Seems their donations aren't suffering from our lack of participation. 

    Used to donate to my Local Shelter until new management took over and it seems to have a PETA outlook now.  Seems more than I feel that way as they

    ran an ad in the local paper asking for donations of money or food as their charitable contributions are down and they are in need.

    c-lane

    Posts: 7

    QUOTE 10/18/2009 10:47:29 AM
    Runningridge,



    You come on here and pull a statement from 7/29/09 when today is 10/18/09. You have followed this topic pretty much the whole way giving your two cents where you felt it was needed. Are you running out of fire now that you have to start jabbing at things that have laid to rest? I have nothing against Modog in general, I dont care for his breeding practices nor the way he treats his so called beloved pets. He is the one who came on here with the first post talking smack about hobby home breeders. There was no need or reason for his post, it was his opinion yes but one that was uncalled for and one that has now started this USDA he said/she said war. Im in full agreement with everything that beaglebrat has stated. Modog did what he planned to do, he got this thread fired up and when he could no longer handle the heat "truth" he got burned. People like you on the other hand must like the burn, because your keeping this bull manure going. I for one have searched high and low from the very beginning on anything that pertained to this topic and every single article ive found says something different. From what I gather from everyones replies is that there are 2 sides, yours and ours. You believe what the USDA tells you and we believe what we feel is right. There are not enough replies in the world on this topic that is going to make people like me and Beaglebrat change our way, its the way WE feel puppies should be raised. Puppies, kittens and other animals are not candy, they should not be popped out of a dispenser on demand. The USDA seems to have a different view on puppy and kitten breeding. There primary goal involves human food, I can only imagen what it will look like if the USDA gets there grubby hands on the entire breeding population. Next they will want to hook up a milk pump to our dogs. Im sure that SOME states now require all breeders to be licensed however, my state is not "that I know of" BUT what I do know is this..... Im sure my vet and Beaglebrats vet will be more then happy to keep us in the loop on any changes when it comes to things like the USDA, after all we do throw them thousands of dollars a year. Also im sure our breed parent club and registry of choice will also keep us informed on any changes that will effect the out come of HOBBY/SHOW breeders. Now with this said... Please drop this topic, its getting old! Q/As direct from the USDA below.



    Q. Who regulates "commercial dog breeders"?
    A. Those facilities that breed and sell their animals to pet stores, brokers, or research facilities are covered under the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) and are inspected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal Care program. Because the focus of the AWA is on commercial dog breeders and wholesale dealers, the law specifically exempts most retail pet stores from Federal regulation. This includes facilities that sell dogs directly to the public. While USDA does not have the authority to regulate retail facilities, many States enforce laws that cover animals in these situations.
    Q. What types of animal dealers does USDA regulate?
    A. The AWA requires people who breed dogs for sale at the wholesale level and the wholesale dealers who supply these animals to pet stores, brokers, or research facilities to be licensed with USDA. These breeders and dealers are required to meet the minimum standards of humane animal care and treatment established by the AWA and enforced by the Animal Care program of USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). The AWA requires people who breed dogs for sale at the wholesale level and the wholesale dealers who supply these animals to pet stores, brokers, or research facilities to be licensed with USDA. These breeders and dealers are required to meet the minimum standards of humane animal care and treatment established by the AWA and enforced by the Animal Care program of USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS).
    Q. How do facilities become licensed?
    A. In order to engage in regulated activities, the animal breeder or dealer must first apply for an AWA license from APHIS. Before receiving an AWA license, the applicant must pass a complete, prelicensing inspection of the prospective animal facility and be in full compliance with all of the AWA standards and regulations. If the facility is in full compliance with the Act, the applicant will be qualified for licensure and will be mailed the appropriate paperwork to complete and submit. After this final step in the process, APHIS issues a license, and business can begin. In order to engage in regulated activities, the animal breeder or dealer must first apply for an AWA license from APHIS. Before receiving an AWA license, the applicant must pass a complete, prelicensing inspection of the prospective animal facility and be in full compliance with all of the AWA standards and regulations. If the facility is in full compliance with the Act, the applicant will be qualified for licensure and will be mailed the appropriate paperwork to complete and submit. After this final step in the process, APHIS issues a license, and business can begin.

     
    Q. Who regulates the animal dealers that are not covered by the AWA?
    A. The AWA protects many animals involved in the commercial pet trade, but it does not cover all animals in all situations. Animals sold by pet stores or directly to the public, owned by individuals (pets), or housed in shelters or pounds are not covered by the Act. The Federal standards are limited to the authority granted by the AWA. However, States have the authority to create and enforce their own regulations which may exceed those standards; most State and local governments also have their own laws that protect animals. The AWA protects many animals involved in the commercial pet trade, but it does not cover all animals in all situations. Animals sold by pet stores or directly to the public, owned by individuals (pets), or housed in shelters or pounds are not covered by the Act. The Federal standards are limited to the authority granted by the AWA. However, States have the authority to create and enforce their own regulations which may exceed those standards; most State and local governments also have their own laws that protect animals.
    Q. Does USDA inspect dog breeding facilities?
    A. USDA inspects all regulated (licensed) dog breeding facilities. Regulated facilities are inspected based on the risk based inspection system. Based on their inspection histories, each facility is rated as low, moderate, or high risk. Moderate-risk facilities would be inspected about once per year; low-risk less often; high-risk more often. No matter what the facility’s rating, inspectors have the option of inspecting as often as they feel necessary and as resources allow. This system allows inspectors to focus their attention on facilities that need assistance coming into compliance with the AWA or need to be monitored more often, so that they can conduct inspections that are more in-depth instead of more frequent. Inspectors will also follow-up on legitimate complaints from private citizens. USDA inspects all regulated (licensed) dog breeding facilities. Regulated facilities are inspected based on the risk based inspection system. Based on their inspection histories, each facility is rated as low, moderate, or high risk. Moderate-risk facilities would be inspected about once per year; low-risk less often; high-risk more often. No matter what the facility’s rating, inspectors have the option of inspecting as often as they feel necessary and as resources allow. This system allows inspectors to focus their attention on facilities that need assistance coming into compliance with the AWA or need to be monitored more often, so that they can conduct inspections that are more in-depth instead of more frequent. Inspectors will also follow-up on legitimate complaints from private citizens.
    Q. What standards of care does APHIS require for animal dealers?
    A. The APHIS requirements cover housing, sanitation, food, water, and protection against extremes of weather and temperature. Federal animal care standards ensure acceptable standards of care. Regulated individuals and businesses are encouraged to provide care that exceeds the specified minimum standards, and States have the authority to impose higher standards of care than those specified in the AWA. Breeders and dealers must employ either a full-time veterinarian or arrange for a veterinarian to visit their business regularly. An outside veterinarian employed by the facility must establish a written program of veterinary care and submit it to APHIS for review. The APHIS requirements cover housing, sanitation, food, water, and protection against extremes of weather and temperature. Federal animal care standards ensure acceptable standards of care. Regulated individuals and businesses are encouraged to provide care that exceeds the specified minimum standards, and States have the authority to impose higher standards of care than those specified in the AWA. Breeders and dealers must employ either a full-time veterinarian or arrange for a veterinarian to visit their business regularly. An outside veterinarian employed by the facility must establish a written program of veterinary care and submit it to APHIS for review.
    Q. Does APHIS confiscate animals?
    A. Once APHIS has evidence of animals suffering in a regulated facility, a notice of intent to confiscate is given to the facility. If they fail to remedy the situation in a short period of time, authorization is obtained from the APHIS Administrator to confiscate the animals in question. In some cases, APHIS negotiates with a facility to surrender the animals directly to an outside organization to simplify the process.
    Once APHIS has evidence of animals suffering in a regulated facility, a notice of intent to confiscate is given to the facility. If they fail to remedy the situation in a short period of time, authorization is obtained from the APHIS Administrator to confiscate the animals in question. In some cases, APHIS negotiates with a facility to surrender the animals directly to an outside organization to simplify the process.
    Q. Does APHIS penalize those facilities in violation of the AWA?
    A. If an inspection reveals deficiencies in meeting AWA standards, the inspector instructs the facility operator to correct the problems within a given timeframe. If deficiencies remain uncorrected, the inspector documents the problems and considers enforcement action. In cases where the violations are relatively minor, a licensee may be required to pay a smaller penalty or make specific improvements to facilities and the care provided to animals. In cases of serious or chronic violations, penalties may include more substantial fines, cease-and-desist orders, and license revocations or suspensions. If an inspection reveals deficiencies in meeting AWA standards, the inspector instructs the facility operator to correct the problems within a given timeframe. If deficiencies remain uncorrected, the inspector documents the problems and considers enforcement action. In cases where the violations are relatively minor, a licensee may be required to pay a smaller penalty or make specific improvements to facilities and the care provided to animals. In cases of serious or chronic violations, penalties may include more substantial fines, cease-and-desist orders, and license revocations or suspensions.

     
    Q. Can an AWA violation ever be a criminal offense?
    A. Violations of certain sections of the AWA are only pursued as criminal, such as those related to animal fighting. Others may include fraudulent records pertaining to the acquisition and disposition of animals. In these cases, the USDA Office of the Inspector General usually conducts investigations and the U.S. Department of Justice prosecutes them. These cases are not overseen by the Administrative Law Judges. Outcomes in criminal cases Violations of certain sections of the AWA are only pursued as criminal, such as those related to animal fighting. Others may include fraudulent records pertaining to the acquisition and disposition of animals. In these cases, the USDA Office of the Inspector General usually conducts investigations and the U.S. Department of Justice prosecutes them. These cases are not overseen by the Administrative Law Judges. Outcomes in criminal cases .
     

     
     



    beaglebrat

    Posts: 1371

    QUOTE 10/18/2009 4:37:19 PM Runningridge-- I agree with a lot of the stuff you say, and I think you are a good person, but you are being a dumb-@ss on this topic.



    I with as many dogs as I have, I think I would know if I need a kennel license. It is handled by the Sherrifs department in our county. They have been here when I thought about applying for a kennel license. I didn't like the "perimeter fence" rule, so I said that I would rather just license each dog indivudually.



    THEY WERE FINE WITH THAT, and IT DOES WORK BOTH WAYS. If you don't want to get a kennel license you CAN LICENSE THEM INDIVIDUALLY.



    You are interpreting the IN LIEU OF statement WRONG.



    beaglebrat

    Posts: 1371

    QUOTE 10/18/2009 4:38:37 PM Do you know how many breeders and show people I know in Michigan, and
    in many different counties? Casually, probably 100+  families and all
    with over 3 dogs, and NONE are USDA licensed and I could count on my
    hand how many have "kennel licenses". Most people in Michigan with
    between 5-25 dogs, just get them individually licensed because they
    don't want any hassles.



    They aren't all wrong. YOU ARE. Please stick with the things you think you know in your own area.
    runningridge

    Posts: 102

    QUOTE 10/23/2009 12:02:01 AM

    Quote c-lane:


    Runningridge,



    You come on here and pull a statement from 7/29/09 when today is 10/18/09. You have followed this topic pretty much the whole way giving your two cents where you felt it was needed. Are you running out of fire now that you have to start jabbing at things that have laid to rest? I have nothing against Modog in general, I dont care for his breeding practices nor the way he treats his so called beloved pets. He is the one who came on here with the first post talking smack about hobby home breeders. There was no need or reason for his post, it was his opinion yes but one that was uncalled for and one that has now started this USDA he said/she said war. Im in full agreement with everything that beaglebrat has stated. Modog did what he planned to do, he got this thread fired up and when he could no longer handle the heat "truth" he got burned. People like you on the other hand must like the burn, because your keeping this bull manure going. I for one have searched high and low from the very beginning on anything that pertained to this topic and every single article ive found says something different. From what I gather from everyones replies is that there are 2 sides, yours and ours. You believe what the USDA tells you and we believe what we feel is right. There are not enough replies in the world on this topic that is going to make people like me and Beaglebrat change our way, its the way WE feel puppies should be raised. Puppies, kittens and other animals are not candy, they should not be popped out of a dispenser on demand. The USDA seems to have a different view on puppy and kitten breeding. There primary goal involves human food, I can only imagen what it will look like if the USDA gets there grubby hands on the entire breeding population. Next they will want to hook up a milk pump to our dogs. Im sure that SOME states now require all breeders to be licensed however, my state is not "that I know of" BUT what I do know is this..... Im sure my vet and Beaglebrats vet will be more then happy to keep us in the loop on any changes when it comes to things like the USDA, after all we do throw them thousands of dollars a year. Also im sure our breed parent club and registry of choice will also keep us informed on any changes that will effect the out come of HOBBY/SHOW breeders. Now with this said... Please drop this topic, its getting old! Q/As direct from the USDA below.



    Q. Who regulates "commercial dog breeders"?
    A. Those facilities that breed and sell their animals to pet stores, brokers, or research facilities are covered under the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) and are inspected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal Care program. Because the focus of the AWA is on commercial dog breeders and wholesale dealers, the law specifically exempts most retail pet stores from Federal regulation. This includes facilities that sell dogs directly to the public. While USDA does not have the authority to regulate retail facilities, many States enforce laws that cover animals in these situations.
    Q. What types of animal dealers does USDA regulate?
    A. The AWA requires people who breed dogs for sale at the wholesale level and the wholesale dealers who supply these animals to pet stores, brokers, or research facilities to be licensed with USDA. These breeders and dealers are required to meet the minimum standards of humane animal care and treatment established by the AWA and enforced by the Animal Care program of USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). The AWA requires people who breed dogs for sale at the wholesale level and the wholesale dealers who supply these animals to pet stores, brokers, or research facilities to be licensed with USDA. These breeders and dealers are required to meet the minimum standards of humane animal care and treatment established by the AWA and enforced by the Animal Care program of USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS).
    Q. How do facilities become licensed?
    A. In order to engage in regulated activities, the animal breeder or dealer must first apply for an AWA license from APHIS. Before receiving an AWA license, the applicant must pass a complete, prelicensing inspection of the prospective animal facility and be in full compliance with all of the AWA standards and regulations. If the facility is in full compliance with the Act, the applicant will be qualified for licensure and will be mailed the appropriate paperwork to complete and submit. After this final step in the process, APHIS issues a license, and business can begin. In order to engage in regulated activities, the animal breeder or dealer must first apply for an AWA license from APHIS. Before receiving an AWA license, the applicant must pass a complete, prelicensing inspection of the prospective animal facility and be in full compliance with all of the AWA standards and regulations. If the facility is in full compliance with the Act, the applicant will be qualified for licensure and will be mailed the appropriate paperwork to complete and submit. After this final step in the process, APHIS issues a license, and business can begin.

     
    Q. Who regulates the animal dealers that are not covered by the AWA?
    A. The AWA protects many animals involved in the commercial pet trade, but it does not cover all animals in all situations. Animals sold by pet stores or directly to the public, owned by individuals (pets), or housed in shelters or pounds are not covered by the Act. The Federal standards are limited to the authority granted by the AWA. However, States have the authority to create and enforce their own regulations which may exceed those standards; most State and local governments also have their own laws that protect animals. The AWA protects many animals involved in the commercial pet trade, but it does not cover all animals in all situations. Animals sold by pet stores or directly to the public, owned by individuals (pets), or housed in shelters or pounds are not covered by the Act. The Federal standards are limited to the authority granted by the AWA. However, States have the authority to create and enforce their own regulations which may exceed those standards; most State and local governments also have their own laws that protect animals.
    Q. Does USDA inspect dog breeding facilities?
    A. USDA inspects all regulated (licensed) dog breeding facilities. Regulated facilities are inspected based on the risk based inspection system. Based on their inspection histories, each facility is rated as low, moderate, or high risk. Moderate-risk facilities would be inspected about once per year; low-risk less often; high-risk more often. No matter what the facility’s rating, inspectors have the option of inspecting as often as they feel necessary and as resources allow. This system allows inspectors to focus their attention on facilities that need assistance coming into compliance with the AWA or need to be monitored more often, so that they can conduct inspections that are more in-depth instead of more frequent. Inspectors will also follow-up on legitimate complaints from private citizens. USDA inspects all regulated (licensed) dog breeding facilities. Regulated facilities are inspected based on the risk based inspection system. Based on their inspection histories, each facility is rated as low, moderate, or high risk. Moderate-risk facilities would be inspected about once per year; low-risk less often; high-risk more often. No matter what the facility’s rating, inspectors have the option of inspecting as often as they feel necessary and as resources allow. This system allows inspectors to focus their attention on facilities that need assistance coming into compliance with the AWA or need to be monitored more often, so that they can conduct inspections that are more in-depth instead of more frequent. Inspectors will also follow-up on legitimate complaints from private citizens.
    Q. What standards of care does APHIS require for animal dealers?
    A. The APHIS requirements cover housing, sanitation, food, water, and protection against extremes of weather and temperature. Federal animal care standards ensure acceptable standards of care. Regulated individuals and businesses are encouraged to provide care that exceeds the specified minimum standards, and States have the authority to impose higher standards of care than those specified in the AWA. Breeders and dealers must employ either a full-time veterinarian or arrange for a veterinarian to visit their business regularly. An outside veterinarian employed by the facility must establish a written program of veterinary care and submit it to APHIS for review. The APHIS requirements cover housing, sanitation, food, water, and protection against extremes of weather and temperature. Federal animal care standards ensure acceptable standards of care. Regulated individuals and businesses are encouraged to provide care that exceeds the specified minimum standards, and States have the authority to impose higher standards of care than those specified in the AWA. Breeders and dealers must employ either a full-time veterinarian or arrange for a veterinarian to visit their business regularly. An outside veterinarian employed by the facility must establish a written program of veterinary care and submit it to APHIS for review.
    Q. Does APHIS confiscate animals?
    A. Once APHIS has evidence of animals suffering in a regulated facility, a notice of intent to confiscate is given to the facility. If they fail to remedy the situation in a short period of time, authorization is obtained from the APHIS Administrator to confiscate the animals in question. In some cases, APHIS negotiates with a facility to surrender the animals directly to an outside organization to simplify the process.
    Once APHIS has evidence of animals suffering in a regulated facility, a notice of intent to confiscate is given to the facility. If they fail to remedy the situation in a short period of time, authorization is obtained from the APHIS Administrator to confiscate the animals in question. In some cases, APHIS negotiates with a facility to surrender the animals directly to an outside organization to simplify the process.
    Q. Does APHIS penalize those facilities in violation of the AWA?
    A. If an inspection reveals deficiencies in meeting AWA standards, the inspector instructs the facility operator to correct the problems within a given timeframe. If deficiencies remain uncorrected, the inspector documents the problems and considers enforcement action. In cases where the violations are relatively minor, a licensee may be required to pay a smaller penalty or make specific improvements to facilities and the care provided to animals. In cases of serious or chronic violations, penalties may include more substantial fines, cease-and-desist orders, and license revocations or suspensions. If an inspection reveals deficiencies in meeting AWA standards, the inspector instructs the facility operator to correct the problems within a given timeframe. If deficiencies remain uncorrected, the inspector documents the problems and considers enforcement action. In cases where the violations are relatively minor, a licensee may be required to pay a smaller penalty or make specific improvements to facilities and the care provided to animals. In cases of serious or chronic violations, penalties may include more substantial fines, cease-and-desist orders, and license revocations or suspensions.

     
    Q. Can an AWA violation ever be a criminal offense?
    A. Violations of certain sections of the AWA are only pursued as criminal, such as those related to animal fighting. Others may include fraudulent records pertaining to the acquisition and disposition of animals. In these cases, the USDA Office of the Inspector General usually conducts investigations and the U.S. Department of Justice prosecutes them. These cases are not overseen by the Administrative Law Judges. Outcomes in criminal cases Violations of certain sections of the AWA are only pursued as criminal, such as those related to animal fighting. Others may include fraudulent records pertaining to the acquisition and disposition of animals. In these cases, the USDA Office of the Inspector General usually conducts investigations and the U.S. Department of Justice prosecutes them. These cases are not overseen by the Administrative Law Judges. Outcomes in criminal cases .
     

     
     



    lol C-lane .... For somebody who wanted this DROPPED you sure did you part to see that it didn't come coming to the top - LOL!

    I've only copied and pasted as I've stated SEVERAL times.  If you can't handle what the written law is then that is your issue and not mine.  I'll continue to post what the LAW is and it's not my problem if you and Beaglebrat don't want to believe it or follow it.  I personally don't care if your regulated or not but I didn't want OTHERS coming here and getting the impression that what was being posted was accurate as I've CLEARLY shown it was not.

    Now as far as what you've posted your truly need to learn that there are sections labeled for certain types of breeders.  I've already posted the definitions and how each Type of Breeder defers in what they are required to have as far as license goes and the rules for their individual type of breeder status.   I'll admit it is quite confusing and the AR's certainly hope it stays that way as they take down hundreds of breeders a day all over the United States by simply playing on their ignorance of the laws that pertain to them.
    runningridge

    Posts: 102

    QUOTE 10/23/2009 12:09:11 AM

    Quote beaglebrat:

    Runningridge-- I agree with a lot of the stuff you say, and I think you are a good person, but you are being a dumb-@ss on this topic.



    I with as many dogs as I have, I think I would know if I need a kennel license. It is handled by the Sherrifs department in our county. They have been here when I thought about applying for a kennel license. I didn't like the "perimeter fence" rule, so I said that I would rather just license each dog indivudually.



    THEY WERE FINE WITH THAT, and IT DOES WORK BOTH WAYS. If you don't want to get a kennel license you CAN LICENSE THEM INDIVIDUALLY.



    You are interpreting the IN LIEU OF statement WRONG.



    Name Calling - tsk tsk ... lol!

    If your local government is willing to let you get by with what your doing then that's GREAT.  I simply posted what was on OFFICIAL Michigan sites so that others coming here would not be misled by the inaccurate information that was being posted.

    I didn't misinterpet anything.  I copied and pasted it just as it was written and if they had of meant for it to be the opposite way as well then they would of had that in writing as well.  Just because you want something to be a certain way doesn't make it so. 

    I certainly hope if there is ever a complaint filed against you that it is your local government that attends to the matter since you and them have it worked out.  Otherwise the AR's will be handing you and your attorney the same material I've just posted. 
    runningridge

    Posts: 102

    QUOTE 10/23/2009 12:15:59 AM

    Quote beaglebrat:

    Do you know how many breeders and show people I know in Michigan, and
    in many different counties? Casually, probably 100+  families and all
    with over 3 dogs, and NONE are USDA licensed and I could count on my
    hand how many have "kennel licenses". Most people in Michigan with
    between 5-25 dogs, just get them individually licensed because they
    don't want any hassles.



    They aren't all wrong. YOU ARE. Please stick with the things you think you know in your own area.
    So your saying all of the OFFICIAL Michigan sites that I copied and pasted from are wrong?  I'm taking a leap of faith here in my ability to research, read and comprehend BUTTTT my theory is that you and your acquaintances are not

    wanting to have to do what is required to have a Kennel License so therefore

    are trying to manipulate it in your own mind so that you feel you don't have to have one.  Which AGAIN I will say - Doesn't really matter to me.  Now if I was an AR reading this then I'd put you at the top of my list and hope to get to know

    a few of your friends as well.  I'll repeat that my post was to be sure that OTHERS weren't led astray if they happened to of started reading this thread.
    c-lane

    Posts: 7

    QUOTE 10/23/2009 3:10:17 AM Runningridge,



    You say you dont care what Beaglebrat and my self do and yet you keep coming back with more crap . The point to my copy and paste you clearly missed. So ill paste the one part in once again.

     
    Q. Who regulates "commercial dog breeders"?
    A. Those facilities that breed and sell their animals to pet stores, brokers, or research facilities are covered under the Animal Welfare Act (AWA) and are inspected by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal Care program. Because the focus of the AWA is on commercial dog breeders and wholesale dealers, the law specifically exempts most retail pet stores from Federal regulation. This includes facilities that sell dogs directly to the public.  "Gee, sounds like HOBBY/SHOW breeders" to me! While USDA does not have the authority to regulate retail facilities, many States enforce laws that cover animals in these situations.

    exempts - Freed from an obligation, a duty, or a liability to which others are subject; excused


    Q. What types of animal dealers does USDA regulate?
    A. The AWA requires people who breed dogs for sale at the wholesale level and the wholesale dealers who supply these animals to pet stores, brokers, or research facilities to be licensed with USDA
    beaglebrat

    Posts: 1371

    QUOTE 10/23/2009 2:22:01 PM Runningridge-- You are just interpreting things WRONG.  The way that YOU want to see them. In Lieu of MEANS INSTEAD OF, and it does mean one or the other. Different areas can have different requirements. Like if you have more than 3 dogs in town you need a kennel licese or what ever. Or it could be more than 6 or more than 12. We do not live inside any city limits.



    Before I purchased my home 8 years ago, knowing that I wanted to breed dogs-- I checked out my local requirements, and it was a deciding factor. I knew I could not live in a town. I can have 8 dogs per acre of property. We have 5 acres, do the math. 



    I don't think they have any problem at all with the number of dogs I have, because it is much much less than I could have on my current property.



    As far as the State is concerned, you are wrong again. I can tell you I had a issue about 18 months ago concerning some adult dogs I purchased out of State. Several of the State vets had to come out several different times. All were aware that my dogs were individually licensed and I didn't have a kennel license.



    So, my county and The State of Michigan are aware of how I raise my dogs and how I license them.  I never have complaints about my dogs-- why would I, if they are well cared for?



    I still get inspected yearly by AKC and have never had any problems at any time with anyone concerning my dogs. All raised in my home. Which every puppy should start out in a home. If you have more than can fit in your house, you have too many dogs and shouldn't be raising them.



    P.S. Quit copy and pasting all this bullcrap that no one, including myself is interested in reading.

    beaglebrat

    Posts: 1371

    QUOTE 10/23/2009 2:28:14 PM I actually read some of the stuff from the michigan law that was highlighted. YOU ARE INTERPRETING THINGS WRONG.



    It says Kennel License MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY BE REQUIRED.  Not IS IS IS Required!



    AND THAT IS IS DETERMINED LOCALLY.  GET IT!!!!!! Exactly what I have been saying. GOD!



    Post Reply New Topic