Shetland Sheepdog - Sheltie Breeders with Puppies for Sale

Shetland Sheepdog - Sheltie Breed Information

Breed Group: Herding
Shetland Sheepdog - Sheltie

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Characteristics
Size:
Grooming Needs:
Exercise Needs:
Good With Dogs:
Watchdog Ability:
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Weight
20 lbs
Height
13-16 inches
Color(s)
Black, blue merle, and sable, marked with varying amounts of white and/or tan
Overview
Resembling a Miniature Collie, this breed is an absolute delight to own. Intelligent, sweet, gentle, making this dog a great companion animal. Throughout the years, this breed has become very popular and is said to have almost a human like intelligence. Sometimes wary of strangers, the Sheltie also loves to bark persistently.
Character
A sweet disposition, this loveable breed does have a very strong herding instinct often nipping at ankles and chasing cars. This is a home breed and should not be kept in a kennel like environment. The Shetland Sheepdog is very affectionate and lovely, yet can be protective of his owner and/or territory. This dog loves being an in-home companion and would gladly lie down on the couch next to his family.
Temperament
High energy, active, very trainable, this breed has a well-rounded and even temperament giving him the idealistics for a household pet. The Shetland Sheepdog does well with children, but children should be properly trained to handle a dog of any breed. Used as a watch dog, this gentle breed will not attack without being repeatedly provoked so does not do well for guarding. Great for herding, this dog is still commonly used for herding purposes in a country environment and does exceptionally well.
Care
Regular brushing is necessary to keep the coat smooth and free of tangles. The long coat of the Sheltie does tend to trap dirt so supervision is necessary unless regular bathing is not a problem. Heavily shedding during certain seasons, the hair can become a mess so grooming is particularly important during this stage.
Coat
The Shetland Sheepdog, better known as the Sheltie has a long double coat, sporting a frill around the neck area. The coat of the Sheltie needs extensive grooming on a regular basis.
Training
The Sheltie is very easy to train and does very well in obedience and herding given the right methods and trainer. Having a human like intelligence, Shetland Sheepdogs are willing to obey, and very eager to do so. Does very well in working environments being that the herding instinct is still very strong.
Activity
This high-energy breed should have regular exercise. Most prefer to allow their Shelties to run free but must be in a fenced in yard, as this breed loves to chase things and will surely bolt if given the opportunity and visual stimulation. An average sized yard would be ideal for this small yet lively breed.
Ownership
Help reduce the number of Shetland Sheepdog - Sheltie puppies in shelters by doing your due diligence. Many puppies are often purchased with little or no knowledge of what goes into parenting one. Uneducated decisions often leave the puppy in need of adoption and in the care of rescue groups. Bringing home a puppy into your family has many benefits but we first implore you to educate yourself. An informed decision will take into account the characteristics of the breed, your lifestyle, expected veterinary care, the demands and limitations of owning one, their activity requirements and levels of companionship required.
Characteristics
Size:
Grooming Needs:
Exercise Needs:
Good With Dogs:
Watchdog Ability:

Featured Shetland Sheepdog - Sheltie Breeder

Chelsea Creek Shelties
Member Since: February 2005
Location: Chattanooga, Tennessee
I have Shetland Sheepdog - Sheltie puppies for sale! See My Profile
akc registered shelties,I have sables,tri's and blue merles with excellent personalities.

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About Shetland Sheepdog Shelties

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Anonymous asked:

9/6/2013 8:18:11 PM

9/6/2013 8:18:11 PM

My 17 month old sheltie has lost most of her coat after weaning puppies--should I be worried? I bought my sheltie from a breeder when she was 16 mos. old; she had just had a litter of puppies and had just finished weaning them when we got her. She has lost a lot more of her coat since then. Her brother has a beautiful full coat and so do her parent. We are hoping that this is just temporary, and her coat will start coming in. Please assure me or tell me to be worried.

2 Comments

Anonymous

It is quite common for females to loose a lot of hair from having puppies. To keep as much coat as possible on my Collies and Shelties I worm the mom every month with pyrantel and/or Iverhart Max. I supplement her diet with a scrambled egg every day, wheat germ oil, flax seed oil, cod liver oil, a multi vitamin, ester c vitamin and I use nuvet supplement. I also feed the most nutritious dog food that I can afford- I used the Dog Food Advisor website to pick a good food. Her hair will grow back. Depending on her diet it could take about a year, but it will grow grow back.
9/10/2013 2:07:47 PM

Anonymous

Hi I am a rectifiable sheltie breeder. They all loose there coats after a litter but it does come back looking even better. I am a little concerned though that she was breed at a young age. I do not breed any of my bitch's until they are 2 years old. I hope this helps.
1/10/2014 7:32:50 PM

Anonymous asked:

4/9/2013 10:27:23 PM

4/9/2013 10:27:23 PM

what other breed is my dog I just adopted a 3 year old dog, she is part sheltie and part something else, How do I figure out what her other breed is?

1 Comment

Anonymous

The only way to know if your dog is a pure-bred or what breeds make up your dog is to have your dog DNA tested. You can buy them online or at your vet for an average cost of $45.00 - $85.00.
7/16/2014 3:14:39 PM

Anonymous asked:

2/12/2013 2:16:06 PM

2/12/2013 2:16:06 PM

how are these dogs with children I have 7 grandchildren and will a sheltie get along with them?

3 Comments    Show 1 more comment(s)

Anonymous

I have triplets and I had my girl a year before they where born.. I could not have picked a better breed of dog to have around my babyies. She was very patient with the kids never not once did anything to hurt them if anything she put up with the pulled hair ect.
6/12/2013 3:05:31 PM

Anonymous

I grew up around Shelties. Our first was Blue Merle Male that was not neutered and he was a sweetheart. He used to lay under my swing when I was little and I used to play "ball" with him in the living room of our home. Our second was Female Sable that slept under my loft bed and she was very protective of me we think this is because she was a retired Breeding female. We never had any problems with her. Shelties are a herding breed they will probably herd your grandchildren. My experience is that they do get protective of little ones and may sometimes nip at ankles traditionally where they nip at on sheep or cows.
6/23/2013 1:28:16 AM

Anonymous asked:

1/7/2013 5:05:44 PM

1/7/2013 5:05:44 PM

why does my sheltie bark at everything and how can i get him to stop

1 Comment

Anonymous

I can't tell you why the Shelties bark so much but when we had that problem our vet suggested a bark collar. It was a very humane quick fix. Our dog learned within just a few minutes not to bark when the collar was on and would bark for joy when we removed the collar. We basically had her wear it only when we were away from home. After a few months our battery needed replacing but we did not need to do so because of the dog's training. She was fooled. This collar saved the relationships we had with our neighbors and kept us from yelling at the doh.
6/3/2013 8:29:15 PM

Anonymous asked:

12/27/2012 4:20:37 PM

12/27/2012 4:20:37 PM

My Sheltie didn't eat yesterday and 1/2 his food today. He is behaving normally though, whats wrong? He had canned food for christmas, then ate nothing then half his food and treats today. He is behaving normally though (barking at horse and vacum, rolling in snow). His gums look normal, teeth fine, nose fine.

1 Comment

Anonymous

We have two shelties. Male and female. Our male will eat every thing in site and has to be on a diet at times, The female will watch her wieght on her own. Some times she eates all her food and some times she wont. I think she likes to be active and has found out that being heavy doesnt go well with active games we play outside
1/7/2014 12:16:10 PM

Anonymous asked:

11/29/2012 11:16:15 AM

11/29/2012 11:16:15 AM

why do shelties die so early?

1 Comment

Anonymous

My healthy Shelties have lived about 14 years. Please seek a vet if yours are acting "old" before the age of 10 years. Unfortunately cancer seems to be their number one issue from modern diets and lifestyles.
9/10/2013 2:11:22 PM

Anonymous asked:

11/18/2012 9:49:36 PM

11/18/2012 9:49:36 PM

what kind of glue could I use? and how long do you leave it on? I saw this answer to a question about shelties and making their ears flop. I had a sheltie and I am getting a new one and would like to know how to make them stay flopped.

2 Comments

Anonymous

use sewing glue,it will come out on it's own.must be applied before adult teeth are in.
11/25/2012 10:10:38 PM

Anonymous

Tear Mender is a good one to use and easy to find. The glue will come undone often and will need to be re-glued until the desired ear set is achieved.
11/29/2012 1:39:23 PM

Anonymous asked:

11/7/2012 1:24:06 PM

11/7/2012 1:24:06 PM

I have the desire to have a sheltie. But I'm afraid cuz I live on a 2 rooms/55m² apartment and I... I have the desire to have a sheltie. But I'm afraid cuz I live on a 2 rooms/55m² apartment and I work 8h per day away from home. Will he be ok if I walk him 2 time a day? What else I should do to keep him healthy in this environment? It would help if I keep one room for him?

2 Comments

Anonymous

On a positive note, I've had dogs of various breeds for longer than I care to remember, and I've learned that a do can get used to being alone for about 8 hours a day. But, it's not easy on the dog or you. Housebreaking is harder and, when puppy gets bored, it's "what can I chew on?" They also need exercise. Expect to spend time with him each day playing. Toss a ball or toy in the apartment and be amazed when he starts running happily at full speed from room to room. Definetely take him for walks. Let him sniff and explore. Outside excercise is better. Shelties love to run...and run. And, although shy around at first with other dogs, once thay get to know them, they'll run and play with them. Major downside: Shelties bark at anything. While you are at work, he will bark at any noise he hears. They are great dogs...will curl up at your feet or next to on the couch and are very devoted. And tend to suffer from seperation anxiety.
11/11/2012 12:26:53 AM

Anonymous

Anonymous is correct. Some ideas to consider: a de-barking operation, an anti-bark collar or anti-bark tool that can be installed in the house. My favorite idea: is there a "doggy daycare" in your area? Somewhere your new sheltie can spend the day playing, excersising and not being bored? If there isn't is there any trusted friends, neighbors, family members that it could stay with while you are at work. A note on the separation anxiety: try to keep the daycare schedule about every other day or a few times a week so you dog does learn that it can stay home when neccessary. Varying the daycare schedule will also help a dog from anticipating and then complaining if it doesn't get to go that day.
11/12/2012 1:59:44 PM

Anonymous asked:

10/31/2012 5:35:40 PM

10/31/2012 5:35:40 PM

Our Sheltie is a wonderful dog and very obedient except he tends to be overly protective,... Our Sheltie is a wonderful dog and very obedient except he tends to be overly protective, especially when I'm in the kitchen. If I rattle pots and pans, he charges into the kitchen, barking and growling and tries to move me away from the stove by nipping. He also attacks the stove. How can we break him of this?

1 Comment

Anonymous

There is a good chance that the sound is actually hurting his ears and he is trying to protect you from the pain. There could also be some other reasons. Bringing him in the kitchen before you start cooking and keeping him in there until you are done will help him see that you are ok. Give him treats out of the pans he attacks will show him that the pans can be a good thing. Putting treats on the stove and then show him where they are coming from when you feed him. "Involve" him in the cooking process as much as possible, show him it is a good thing (with treats), and have him practice his sit stays and lieing down and staying (start on a leash) while you are cooking too. It never hurts to consult a good dog training book or trainer in person.
11/12/2012 2:10:11 PM

Anonymous asked:

8/19/2012 10:57:03 AM

8/19/2012 10:57:03 AM

Why do some shelties ears flop and others don't --can you train the ears to flop?

3 Comments    Show 1 more comment(s)

Anonymous

what kind of glue can you use to do this and for how long?
11/18/2012 9:43:04 PM

Anonymous

Some breeders use tape or glue. Some Shelties however they are trained their ears never flop.
6/23/2013 1:31:36 AM

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Updated: 12/25/2014