Keeshond Breeders with Puppies for Sale

Keeshond Breed Information

Breed Group: Non-Sporting
Keeshond

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Characteristics
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Grooming Needs:
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Good With Dogs:
Watchdog Ability:
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Weight
Male: 45; Female: 35 lbs
Height
Male: 17-19; Female 16-18 inches
Color(s)
mixture of gray, black, and cream. Undercoat is pale, and tips of the outercoat are black. Black muzzle, ears, tail tip
Overview
The Keeshond is a member of the Spitz family. They have an Arctic origin that dates back to the 18th century. Their sole purpose was that of a popular family pet. This breed is compact, muscular, and extremely reliable. Keeshonds excel at being a watchdog, show dog, and companion.
Character
The Keeshond has an outgoing personality. They are commonly referred to as the "Smiling Dutchman", bestowed upon this breed for their ability to curl their lip to resemble a grin. The Keeshond often does this as a greeting for people they are extremely fond of.
Temperament
The Keeshond is highly intelligent and affectionate. They are friendly to other people and dogs. They adore children and are excellent family pets. They thrive on human companionship. They are empathic and intuitive, and are frequently used as therapy dogs. They have a loud distinctive bark and make good watchdogs. The Keeshond is loyal and full of personality. They are neither timid nor aggressive.
Care
The Keeshond requires thorough daily brushing. It is important to never clip this breed for the summer as the outer coat provides insulation from the heat and sun. Keeshonds are very clean breeds that will generally groom themselves. Bathing should only be done when necessary. Dry shampoo as needed. They may be prone to hip dysplasia, slipped stifles, Von Willebrand's disease, hypothyroidism, and epilepsy.
Coat
The Keeshond has a plush, abundant double coat. The outer coat is long, straight, and harsh. The under coat is soft and downy in texture. The coat is extremely thick around the neck, shoulders, and chest. The hair on the head is short, smooth, and soft. The Keeshond has markings around the eyes that resemble spectacles. The coat is longer on the legs and is lighter in color. The most common coat color is a mixture of black, cream, and gray. They may also be black, brown, orange, buff, and white. The coat is shed twice a year.
Training
The Keeshond can be quite a challenge in the area of training. They have a mischievous streak and enjoy making up their own routine. They are extremely adept in obedience and agility. They do best with consistency, fairness, and structure. They become bored with repetitive training.
Activity
The Keeshond is happiest when they are participating in family activities. They do not require a great deal of exercise and make excellent apartment dwellers. They enjoy a daily walk, playing ball, or Frisbee. Keeshonds benefit from a small, securely fenced yard. If they are left alone outside for too long they may become bored and dig.
Ownership
Help reduce the number of Keeshond puppies in shelters by doing your due diligence. Many puppies are often purchased with little or no knowledge of what goes into parenting one. Uneducated decisions often leave the puppy in need of adoption and in the care of rescue groups. Bringing home a puppy into your family has many benefits but we first implore you to educate yourself. An informed decision will take into account the characteristics of the breed, your lifestyle, expected veterinary care, the demands and limitations of owning one, their activity requirements and levels of companionship required.
Characteristics
Size:
Grooming Needs:
Exercise Needs:
Good With Dogs:
Watchdog Ability:

Featured Keeshond Breeder

Kees R Us Breeders
Member Since: January 2006
Location: Space Coast, Florida
I have Keeshond puppies for sale! See My Profile
Breeder of companion keeshonden since 1985. I screen all buyers to make sure each puppy is going to a good and safe home. I won't sell to brokers or pet stores. I do breed at least once a year. All keeshonden are OFA and CERF certified as well as the DNA of the males is registered with the AKC.

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About Keeshonds

Share what you know. Answer a question.

Anonymous asked:

4/8/2015 9:33:40 AM

4/8/2015 9:33:40 AM

Some people post they are hobby breeders, what exactly is that? Is there a criteria that makes this different from other breeders?

4 Comments

Anonymous

A hobby breeder is someone who breeds dogs but has a full time or part time job as well. A breeder is someone who solely breeds dogs and that is their only source of income. Back Yard Breeders are the one's you want to steer clear of. They are the ones that just breed dogs because they are cute and sell the puppies for money but do not take care of their dogs.
4/8/2015 11:16:44 AM

Anonymous

That is not what a Hobby Breeder is at all. A hobby breeder is "Into" Dogs (shows, training, clubs, etc.). They belong to dog clubs and organizations,Proves quality of their dogs and suitability for breeding by competing for titles and certificates in conformation, obedience, agility, field trialing, etc. Pups' pedigrees are filled with dogs who have obtained show titles/working certificates; never breeds dogs without "papers", knowledgeable in every facet of breed, including that of health issues/defects; researches genetics when choosing mates ,Knows his puppies' ancestry.
4/8/2015 4:11:18 PM

Anonymous

to continue I also want to add...A Hobby Breeder does not use dog breeding as a business and strives for quality, not quantity. Breeds only dogs which meet breed standard. Breeds only dogs over 2 years old, and a limited number of times. Mate choice could be anywhere in the country (almost never breeds his own males to his own females). Does all genetic testing and will provide proof; does not breed animals with genetic defects or which are carriers of defects. Puppies are sold from waiting list created before breeding even takes place, puppies are bred to meet the standard not all go to show homes and (show-quality costs more) etc etc That is only a few. Being a hobby breeder has absolutely nothing to do with whether you work full time or part time.
4/8/2015 4:13:03 PM

Anonymous

They are people who have a passion for their breed. They show their dogs , they research about their breed. They are life-long students of the breed. They are members of local/ all-breed kennel clubs. They breed to better the breed. Breedings are done with parents who have been health checked and are excellent representative. Puppies are raised in the home, and extensively socialized. Prospective owners are interviewed before they're allowed to purchase a puppy, and sold on contract with guarantees, and will not sell to anyone who wants a dog . Impulse buyers are not accommodated by the serious hobby breeder -- That's one of the reasons that commercial breeders and byb exist. You won't find puppies from these breeders on the internet puppy sites. You may find they have private web sites. sell companion puppies on AKC limited registrations with a spay/neuter contract.
4/9/2015 10:12:30 AM

Anonymous asked:

7/10/2014 6:10:44 PM

7/10/2014 6:10:44 PM

Do Keeshonds like the water Do Keeshonds all bathe in their water bowl

1 Comment

Anonymous

No. Like all breeds of dogs, some like water while some other's don't. If you want your Keeshond to like water, make water a positive experience when you get your pup. Although, they have a lot of fur and some of them will put their faces and paws into the water dish to cool off.
7/11/2014 1:02:11 PM

Anonymous asked:

5/28/2013 10:07:28 PM

5/28/2013 10:07:28 PM

Why do some Keeshond breeders do health testing and what is the reasoning behind it? Asking because some talk of one specific test they did and others talk about fully tested.

3 Comments

Anonymous

Personally for me, I want to make sure what tests are available for our breed are done. I want to make sure my dogs hips are sound, that any puppies produced come from parents who are OFA fair,good or excellent. I do hips/patellas/cardiac/elbows/thyroid/phpt and CERF these are the 7 tests ou they recommended. All breeders have issues any that tells you they have not I would be leery of , we wish we could test for everything and produce only the soundest puppies. Unfortunately not everything is in our control. Just as humans we are born healthy but could develop DM, or hypothyroidism even cancer even if none in our family lineage has it. But doing the health testing that is available is a good start.
5/29/2013 12:25:56 PM

Anonymous

Breeders who want to make sure that their breeding adults are healthy before breeding do the testing. It is a way to assure the healthiest puppies. Keeshonds have several health issues and some of them you can test your dogs before breeding. Testing your dogs and them passing the testing gives you a much greater chance of the puppies not developing the issues. If your dogs do not pass then spay/neuter is recommended so that the health issue is not passed to puppies. It is just a way of being as responsible as you can when breeding your dogs. There is much information at www.offa.org on health testing and the benefits in having health tested parents !
5/29/2013 1:02:31 PM

Anonymous

Patellar Luxation is a very good test to talk about. It is fairly common in this breed. It can be graded by a Veterinarian in a simple physical exam when taking your dog in for its annual exam. It cost only $15 to send the results into OFA for the public to view. If your dogs have this issue and you breed them anyway it will most likely be passed to some of your offspring. Why not know the parents are clear of the issue if you are thinking about a new puppy. You cannot test for every health condition but the ones you can I feel it is our responsibility as a breeders to do the testing available.
5/29/2013 1:18:04 PM

Anonymous asked:

3/31/2013 1:50:22 PM

3/31/2013 1:50:22 PM

grooming needs for Keeshond hair

2 Comments

Anonymous

A good rake style brush, for removing loose undercoat. The best way I have found is to brush all the hair forward towards the head. You want to remove the collar, and pay attention to the hair underneath as it is likely to matt faster.
4/1/2013 8:02:31 PM

Anonymous

Before bathing a kees, the dead hair should be removed from the coat,you should be able to comb through the entire coat right down to the skin without difficulty,I use a long toothe stainless comb, then use a regular dog shampoo like PurePet. I blow dry my dogs with a blower made for dogs, it has no heat settings.As you blow dry, you should brush with a soft brush, avoid pin brushes that can break the hair. They can be used once he is dry. Dry your kees thoroughly to avoid matts from forming and prevent the wet hair from laying on the skin. Trim the hair on the pads, you can use a dremel to round the nails. Do not forget to brush the teeth too. There are videos online to show how to properly groom the keeshond search it out it could help you. Best of luck
4/3/2013 9:16:04 AM

Anonymous asked:

3/26/2013 1:43:11 PM

3/26/2013 1:43:11 PM

stress in senior dogs Loose stools when boarded or groomed. Sample tested and found negative. Stress?

1 Comment

Anonymous

This can be stress related, most are given Metronidazole, label name Flagyl, prior to the experience that causes the problem as the medication acts in a neurological fashion as well as aiding in the stopping of the symptoms.
4/1/2013 5:40:44 PM

Anonymous asked:

3/25/2013 1:31:22 PM

3/25/2013 1:31:22 PM

How do you know what registry one should look for when buying a puppy? Some say AKC, others say CKC

7 Comments

Anonymous

CKC (Continental Kennel Club)and AKC (American Kennel Club) have different eligibility requirements for their registries. AKC requires the pedigree of a dog to be confirmed before the dog is accepted for registration. The pedigree of a dog is like a family tree; it provides proof that the dog is from a purebred line for a number of generations. In contrast, a dog can be registered with the CKC without proof of pedigree by providing three photos (from the front, left and right) and two witness signatures. I would go with AKC any day over CKC
3/25/2013 2:48:11 PM

Anonymous

If the CKC is the Canadian Kennel Club that registry is like our AKC. If the CKC is the Continental Kennel Club well then in my opinion run run run. Go with AKC
3/25/2013 4:04:51 PM

Anonymous

AKC is a far better registry and as below says, anyone can register a half-bred dog through CKC very easy. You can find that here on this site within this breed. You can also buy an AKC puppy with limited registration then go and register it through CKC and breed the dog with full rights. That is where many of the CKC dogs come from. They buy dogs without breeding rights then go to CKC to get registration to breed and sell.
3/26/2013 10:24:31 AM

Anonymous

I register all of mine with AKC and UKC. The American Kennel Club and the United Kennel Club. These clubs also hold dog shows as well as determining a dog’s pedigree. They are two different entities and they share some similarities and several differences AKC allows professional handlers at their dog shows, while UKC does not. AKC has been around since 1884 and UKC since 1898. I would not register any dog unless they are one of these 2 registries
3/26/2013 6:23:35 PM

Anonymous

CKC contains some high quality lines now due to AKC breeders not following up on their spay/neuter agreements and just trusting that the dogs they sold are altered. Many are not and are instead registered with CKC and used for breeding. Also CKC contains foundation show lines from when the breed standards were first being set and breeders had to rid themselves of puppies they produced that did not meet that standard. They sold or gave them away without registration and many went on the some of the first dogs registered with CKC. So don't believe that there's not great bloodlines within this breed at CKC because there absolutely are some fantastic ones.
4/4/2013 1:29:33 PM

Anonymous

I think you will find that if a breeder sells on spay/neuter they certainly do follow up with it but as with anything there are always a few who may not. There are certainly some good lines with the registry; I cross register all mine with CKC, 1 of which is AKC Champion so yes there are a few good lines there. But for real, as majority below agree, most are not from pure lines and CKC (Continental Kennel Club) is notoriously know for that. I am a preferred breeder with CKC and I personally register all my puppies with CKC with their microchip # to prevent breeders from trying to steal rights. Seems that is the only place unethical breeders can manage to do that. AKC will not let anyone just send in pictures and allow registering.
4/5/2013 8:52:48 AM

Anonymous

I disagree, I have owned and bred CKC in the Past.. Wonderful dogs, healthy, no issues, and had FULL PEDIGREES. Although it is true, some dogs registered have no background on file.. Those tend to be stolen quality lines re-registered. If looking at a CKC registered pet, ask if there is a full pedigree listed,on both parents if so your fine, if not.. Then it comes down to, How important is the registry to you VS Do you like what you see and paying for. AKC hasn't got the best reputation either, although one of the safer clubs. Also I'd point out the same people saying keep away are likely the same people who forget they all registered their own stock as CKC as a secondary, to prevent fraudulent use, and have their AKC pedigrees on file with the CKC. It boils down to price, and do you like the puppy you see.
7/28/2013 9:25:48 PM

Anonymous asked:

2/3/2013 1:58:26 AM

2/3/2013 1:58:26 AM

do keeshound dogs breath rapidly normally?? My 4 month old female keeshound always breathes very rapidly. Is this normal?? We just adopted her and have never owned this type of dog. Any help would be appreciated.

8 Comments

Anonymous

In general no it is not normal. If a kees is very hot or stressed they may do that for short periods of time but if your kees is doing that all the time I would certainly see a vet and have the puppy examined. If you purchased the puppy at an older age, older then 8 weeks there may be underlying issues. Kees are normally hard to find and most good breeders do not have them over 8 weeks. If a breeder is having trouble selling puppies then it might be because of health issues or other reasons. Word does get around quickly so the less desirable puppies will be still available after 8 weeks of age. You may want to take the puppy to a specialist if your vet does not find anything wrong and the issue continues.
2/4/2013 6:19:15 PM

Anonymous

Actually, yes this is very normal. Just as with babies and toddlers, young puppies DO breathe more rapidly than an older dog. Perhaps the know it all erbekees should spend some time with a litter of the puppies she has and watch them breathe. Even while asleep their breath count is high. The Keeshond is an extremely healthy breed. As someone who has spoken with and sold puppies to previous owners of the so called health tested Keeshond, I can tell you those lines DO get sick just like the non tested lines. And they lose their battle with disease sometimes as young as 5 years old. So don't feel bad about your delightful puppy especially not if you paid a little less for her or if she was a little older than 8 weeks when you got her, there's most likely nothing wrong with her. Shame on other breeders for saying terrible things about a poor defenseless puppy like that.
3/3/2013 3:09:30 PM

Anonymous

New Owner, That breeder is sadly mistaken, Please do refer to your Vet for verification but yes it can be normal, puppies do have a higher rate of breath. Now if the puppy is laboring in anyway there could be an underlying issue. Keeshonds do pant alot, its common anyone who pays alot of attention to the Keeshonden can tell you this. Also You can and its a dirty breeder that says older pups are all a problem.. its not true. Our puppies normally sell for 900 each.. and outsold other breeders,This time last year. This year I had several liters at once! I happen to have a few older.. and I sell them cheaper because they arent as cute or desirable as a 6-8 week old. Bottom line they will still grow up to be awesome beautiful pets! Its a breeders reputation you must go on, and I happen to have a very good one with references to prove it. I am happy to offer advice, the best I can. I also tell everyone, Consult your vet. Keeshonds are not that rare, Good breeders are however.
3/3/2013 10:49:47 PM

Anonymous

Fast breathing is normal, theyalso have a faster heart rate than the older dog. I can't understand why some breeders want people who don't buy from them to think all other puppies are sick. And know that in spite of what this other person told you, the top bloodlines of most breeds live the shortest of all lifetimes. Keeshond are not hard to find. Maybe 20 years ago they were but now they're readily available with AKC puppies being sold for as little as $500 with full breeding rights from several breeders. Just because a breeder has puppies past 8 weeks doesn't mean they "have trouble" selling them. It means one of many things: they do not sell to every person who wants one, maybe they have more than one litter available, they do not offer to fly their puppies so that limits them to buyers who are willing to drive but it in no way means their dogs or puppies are sick. Enjoy your puppy, it is hard to find an unhealthy Keeshond in spite of what the other person wants you to believe.
3/4/2013 4:25:51 AM

Anonymous

Rapid breathing is not normal, panting and rapid breathing are so different. Dogs have no sweat glands so if they pant rapidly that is one thing however Rapid breathing can be alarming to a new owner, if labored it could be an allergic reaction or heart failure. Call the vet and get the puppy checked
3/7/2013 4:43:02 PM

Anonymous

These "breeders" certainly want these puppies going to the Vet a lot. I work for a Vet, we love visits like this. There's never anything wrong, it's just the rapid breathing of a young dog. They sometimes breath faster when they are dreaming too. You are nervous and want to be careful but unless the puppy is not playful, not eating or drinking water or is vomiting there's absolutely nothing wrong here. Let sleeping dogs lie.
3/9/2013 11:48:16 AM

Anonymous

As a breeder and a dog owner I have always found that if something concerns you enough to ask questions about it here or anywhere for that matter, it obviously is out of what you think is normal. Being that none of us here are licensed veterinarians we can only offer our experience and opinion, which in no way compares to a veterinarian exam. My advice no matter what is if you have a concern about your pets health and they are doing something specific that worries you, yes do take it to the vet. If it is a needless visit well then better safe then sorry. I have no idea why anyone would suggest not taking your puppy/dog to the vet if it had something that you thought was not a normal action.
3/13/2013 10:39:36 AM

Anonymous

I have to agree.. if in doubt.. your best advice is call the vet. once you have a good vet, they should be willing to answer questions.
3/13/2013 7:35:30 PM

Anonymous asked:

1/7/2013 3:42:06 AM

1/7/2013 3:42:06 AM

What is a fair price for a puppy keeshond?

11 Comments    Show 1 more comment(s)

Anonymous

More people should be concerned about how healthy the puppy will be when you get it home not the best price you can find. You may save a few hundred bucks buying a puppy but then get puppy home and have huge vet bills because puppy is ill. You may think you are getting a bargain at $500 vs $1000 but that money can be lost in just one or two vet visits with a sick puppy. Spend your money wisely and research the breeder before you place deposit. Research the breed and know what health issues are common in the breed and look for parents that are health tested for those specific health issues. If you know the parents are health tested then that can eliminate a lot of potential issues that may arise in the future thus saving you hundreds possibly thousands. So my advice is find a breeder that has a background of healthy puppies and more importantly healthy adults and make that your goal. Prices vary hugely for puppies but only a small handful offer proof of healthy puppies.
1/9/2013 10:01:28 AM

Anonymous

You should know that most companion breeders buy their breeding dogs from the very same breeders because there are only a couple that sell AKC with breeding rights. Therefore, the vast majority of the companion dogs being bred that have been tested are full blood relatives to those that have not been tested making all of them negative for the majority of the common illnesses or disorders. Only those with immediate show dogs on their pedigree don't come from these common companion breeders dogs. So priced high or low, you are pretty much buying the same puppy since they have the same bloodlines from the same original breeders that are selling to others to breed. Pay what you are comfortable paying, there's little to worry about with this breed.
1/31/2013 1:12:40 PM

Anonymous

Actually even though some might be related does not secure health, all siblings born in one litter will not always be as healthy as the others, this is why you health screen because you only want to use the stock that is tested good. Taking a chance on breeding puppies without testing the parents is just that taking a chance
2/1/2013 5:23:01 PM

Anonymous

Knowing where you purchase your puppy from is much more important then what you pay. Prices can vary greatly within this breed so the biggest question is what are you getting for your money. One of the comments below state: if related that automatically makes them negative for majority of illnesses. That simply is not true and that can be quickly researched to find the truth. Knowing the breeder you chose is knowledgeable about this breed and is telling you the truth is worth more then anything I would think. It is true you can only pay what you can afford but don’t be mislead thinking the parents of your puppy are clear of genetic issues without having them tested prior to breeding. If the statement were correct then every puppy would never have any health issues and that simply is not the case. I personally have purchased many of my dogs from abroad, from health tested parents, because of the genetic issues in the companion dogs here in the states.
2/11/2013 10:38:49 AM

Anonymous

Honestly, look at the breeder profile, puppies if overpriced wont sell. IF a breeder has been around awhile, and has the quality, they do charge more.. and they get their prices. once in awhile you'll find an otheriwse high priced breeder who, either has too many, is expecting another litter or even has other issues going on and must move puppies fast so they reduce puppies.. ASK WHY! I did and got a top quality male with alot of Champion background and paid insanely little because of a divorce! Thier loss my gain so ask questions
3/3/2013 11:07:17 PM

Anonymous

I would say no matter what the price, to ask for the pedigrees. If a breeder is touting Champion bloodlines when in fact there are only 2 champions on the mother’s side way back in the 4th generation, well that simply is not Champion quality. Many breeders use this approach as a way to make you think you are getting a better quality dog when in fact you are getting a puppy with basically nothing out of the ordinary, no health testing on the parents AND they are charging top dollar.
3/7/2013 11:18:15 AM

Anonymous

The post below suggests some breeders have to many puppies and lower prices to “move” the puppies. Any responsible breeder will not have several litters all at once without the majority of the litters being sold. Most breeders will have several deposits on the litter before even breeding adults not the other way around. But I will agree that knowing where your puppies come from is the key here, make a home visit and see for yourself.
3/7/2013 11:26:39 AM

Anonymous

When looking at a pedigree CH should be in the 1st and 2nd generation anything further back on that pedigree has been washed out by not breeding to the better quality.If there are no CH in 1st and 2nd generation and they appear in 3rd or 4th generation you are not getting a CH line, Do not be fooled by people boasting CH pedigrees
3/7/2013 4:22:16 PM

Anonymous

I guess bottom line is education is the best approach, do just a little research and see what claims are true and what claims are not. Don’t take anyone’s advice find the facts for yourself. Pay what you feel is appropriate for what you are looking for. For Miss NCarolina who purchased a “top quality male with alot of Champion background” Look at the pedigree and see for yourself, it is posted on my website. I am not seeing “a lot of Champion” in that pedigree but 2 compared to zero can be a lot…….I guess. Get proof of any claims and all promises in writing! As you can see breeders all have their opinions on what is right and what is wrong, it is up to you as the buyer to determine which breeder is right for you.
3/7/2013 7:53:59 PM

Anonymous

A fair price, is what your willing to pay for whatever puppy your looking at. Quality is everything. Those who constantly buy new stock, have to test more because they have no history. Those of us with long term proven healthy stock, don't have a lot to prove when we have a client base as long as your dogs tail with no issues. I'd also point out, even with full testing.. The fact of life here, your dog will die of something.. be it a form of cancer we cant test for, a blood issue, any number of things there are just no tests for. There is a huge false sense of security produced by those touting " Fully Health Tested" I have sold to clients who bought from the " Better breeders" in the past.. after they buried their dog from a number of ailments. In fact, Breeders whom replied to this very question have owned dogs themselves and bred from the very breeders who produced sick dogs. know your breeder, check references,
7/28/2013 9:40:48 PM

Anonymous asked:

12/1/2012 9:28:46 AM

12/1/2012 9:28:46 AM

What is the difference between vet cert. hips and OFA eval on this breed?

10 Comments

Anonymous

I have been raising Keeshonds since 1982 and have never heard of vet certified hips. Sure I can imagine a vet can examine an animal a state they look ok but unless you have an actual xray done there is no other way to see when that hip joint placement is, whether there is laxicity in that joint. Patellas are done by an examination by a vet but never hips. Eyes are done by a board certified canine opth, and unless this is done how do you know if your dog has PRA? Xrays are also done of elbows there is no other way to see where that joint also lies. PHPT testing is very important in this breed. Don't be fooled by fancy websites or people claiming there dogs are healthy ask for hard proof.
12/4/2012 4:09:22 PM

Anonymous

The difference is one is a real evaluation (OFA) and the other (Vet Certified) is a scam breeders are using to lie about the health of their dogs. The only way a dog can be screened for Hip Dysplasia is by having an x-ray taken and the vet then sending it off to OFA to be evaluated and scored. The results will be posted on the OFA board under the registered name of the dog. You can go to offa.org and do a search by the dog’s registered name; all health testing that has been completed will be listed under the dog’s name. If a breeder claims any health testing and the dogs are not listed on this board I would question the ethics of said breeder. If a breeder is lying about health screening be very concerned about the real health of the dogs/puppies they are selling.
12/4/2012 4:21:46 PM

Anonymous

Any reputable breeder should have at least done at minimum Penn Hip eval or OFA hip xrays, Penn Hip method takes 3 films they measure the actual laxicity and look for signs of DJD plus more OFA can give a rating of fair, good or excellent which tells you that the hips are placed.Without either of these films there is NO WAY to tell if the hips are alligned or if there is dysplasia present. At minimum also PHPT should be done and parents should be tested Neg, or Neg by descent. Good breeders will also do OFA Patellas, ( The trick knees), OFA Elbows ( this is also a xray), OFA Thyroid study, OFA Cardiac, and eyes should be tested for congenital eye diseaseand CERF. So many things go into account for a healthy puppy, some sell for the same price of a good breeder but those who do not do the testing are in this to make a buck not for the breed. Look closely at the breeder ask for hard proof these tests are performed Thank you Clingmey
12/5/2012 7:39:15 PM

Anonymous

Vet certified hips means a licensed, board certified Vet has x-rayed and very carefully evaluated those x-rays to determine the dogs knees, hips and elbow structures to be sound and tight before giving the breeder the go ahead to breed the dog. This is done by a Vet who is highly trained, with many years experience , and in at least one case also being an AKC Conformation Instructor as well as the primary caregiver to many Westminster winning dogs from some of the top breeders in the country. For a breed they claim needs so much testing, the imported dogs also consistently test free of these supposedly common diseases and disorders that they want you to be scared other breeders are ignoring. Buy what you want at the price you want to pay, just don't buy from a Pet Store because that is where the breeders who truly do not care for or about their dogs sell their puppies since there is no accountability on their part.
1/15/2013 5:53:04 AM

Anonymous

Unless the vet is a specialized orthopedic vet and is able to give you a factual reading on the hips/elbows then no you are not correct in your assumption, think about it its just like humans you have a heart condition who do you go to your GP or do you see a cardiologist? Same with bones,joints etc.You would see a orthopedic MD, regular class vets can do the films that are needed and give you an assumption but that is what it is just an assumption and then those films are needed to be sent to a canine orthopedic vet to do the actual evaluation, hence the reason for OFFA or PENN HIP studies. Same with eyes you as a person see a opth. canines also see a canine opth.Thats why there is CERF.. Reg vets can draw the blood for thyroid studies but you would see an endocrinologist , OFA has certain standards to be met before breeding, these are the actual guidelines breeders use
2/2/2013 2:31:58 PM

Anonymous

I do know which dog anon is referring to, she had asked me about my dog as she was buying a dog who came from the same breeder. her female and my dog do have the same sire does not constitute good health, the breeder I got him from did zero health testing, I tested this dog prior to breeding. to compare, rely on my results is not a good idea, they do not have the same dam, just because my dog is heath tested good does not guarantee any other puppy born from those parents are as healthy as he is.visit www.offa.org board search out the keeshond for testing to be done. We as responsible breeders are trying to keep this breed healthy and weed out things like phpt (which btw) is breed specific. my vet didnt know of phpt, I brought it to her attention from the research Cornell University had done where they were able to locate this genetic marker for this breed. It is better to be informed and know what you are talking about than to ever assume
2/2/2013 3:31:45 PM

Anonymous

Radiographs of animals 24 months of age or older are independently evaluated by three randomly selected, board-certified veterinary radiologists from a pool of 20 to 25 consulting radiologists throughout the USA in private practice and academia. Each radiologist evaluates the animal's hip status considering the breed, sex, and age. There are approximately 9 different anatomic areas of the hip that are evaluated.
2/4/2013 11:09:54 AM

Anonymous

The radiologist is concerned with deviations in these structures from the breed normal. Congruency and confluence of the hip joint (degree of fit) are also considered which dictate the conformation differences within normal when there is an absence of radiographic findings consistent with HD. The radiologist will grade the hips with one of seven different physical (phenotypic) hip conformations: normal which includes excellent, good, or fair classifications, borderline or dysplastic which includes mild, moderate, or severe classifications
2/4/2013 11:11:40 AM

Anonymous

You are right on ANON!!!! A canine radiologist reads the films for OFA those results are given to your primary vet to discuss with the client. So many people are misguided so happy to see someone else out there understands the importance of health screening.
2/4/2013 12:11:35 PM

Anonymous

Health testing on a dog of any breed has nothing to do with being a conformation instructor, a conf inst teaches handling a dog for the show ring, how and when to bait a dog, how to stack a dog etc. Westminster has nothing to do with health screening either, and an FYI Kees tested nationally and out of the USA can be found on www.OFFA.org and the international board http://www.healthmatters.keeshondclub.org.uk/
2/4/2013 1:07:16 PM

Anonymous asked:

8/19/2012 10:31:19 AM

8/19/2012 10:31:19 AM

Our Keeshond Buddy is going to be three. We got him when he was six months. He often looks... Our Keeshond Buddy is going to be three. We got him when he was six months. He often looks sad/depressed. How can I play more with him? He never seemed interested in fetching a ball. Also has anyone else noticed their are extremely sensitive to sounds?

1 Comment

Anonymous

Keeshond love a good round of tug. Interactive toys are good where they have to think to get a treat. Most Keeshonds don't like fetch. They are so smart, they think "Why should I chase something that is being thrown away"! Walks, and play dates with dog friends make for a happy dog. Bully sticks are great for chewing needs.
12/13/2012 12:21:30 PM

Anonymous asked:

7/3/2012 2:07:30 PM

7/3/2012 2:07:30 PM

how long does a male keeshound live up to?

3 Comments

Anonymous

Normal life span for a healthy Keeshond is 12 to 15 years.
7/3/2012 7:43:27 PM

Anonymous

14-16 for a very healthy dog.
3/3/2013 10:51:41 PM

Anonymous

As long as genetics allows. I have known Kees to die at 5 years old from cancer.
3/9/2013 11:40:58 AM

Anonymous asked:

3/16/2012 3:36:17 PM

3/16/2012 3:36:17 PM

My dog "Grizzly" passed away at the age of 4, He was my best friend so i would only like to make... My dog "Grizzly" passed away at the age of 4, He was my best friend so i would only like to make at statement to all Keeshond owners, show your dog you love them every day and don't take it for granted that they will live a long life. Grizzly was taken from us a few days after finding out he had cancer throughout his body and could not be saved. He loved us and we loved him so much, so please treat your Keeshond with love every day because they will show you twice as much love to their owner.

2 Comments

Anonymous

Very sad indeed we once has a keeshond who was six years and got sick. Found out he had terminal cancer and months to live. We ended up getting a second keesond and right now it is 15 years old. Now after having it for all those years we have to put it down due to CHF. Both are so sad and i think it is all the same. Your are going to miss them no matter what. I have to bring mine in within the next few days.
10/29/2012 5:29:45 AM

Anonymous

Even the best of bloodlines carry cancer genes that cancers, We as breeders, can not test for at this time although there are specialists working to locate the genes. If buyers would report these issues to their breeder and the breeder would remove dogs from their breeding program, the world would be a better place. However, many breeders refuse to stop breeding the affected bloodline or parent dogs because they simply make too much money from it. Any breeder that claims to have never had any issue reported is not being truthful with you. Find another breeder.
4/9/2013 11:45:43 AM

Anonymous asked:

3/13/2012 6:50:24 PM

3/13/2012 6:50:24 PM

I am looking to buy a keeshond puppy, the sex of the puppy does not matter to me as I have had... I am looking to buy a keeshond puppy, the sex of the puppy does not matter to me as I have had both in the past. There are so many ads running on this site , how does one know who to buy from? I see some do health testing and some do none. What important tests should I be looking for with this breed? Thank you Carol

10 Comments

Anonymous

Hi Carol, great questions. You should definately look for testing of PHPT, Hips and Elbows, Patellas too. Also check to see if eyes have been checked. These tests are just a few reccommended by the Keeshond Club of America. If the breeder you are considering does not do these tests then look elsewhere. Health tested parents make healthier puppies
3/14/2012 1:20:27 PM

Anonymous

Breeders have certain guidelines they follow, testing is one of them. If they don't test for problems associated with that breed then look elsewhere
3/14/2012 6:18:10 PM

Anonymous

When purchasing a puppy if you have the choice between health-tested parents and untested parents the choice seems obvious. The best choice is always health-tested; you get what you pay for so choose the best puppy you can afford. With testing usually comes a higher price but well worth the long-term investment. You may pay $100-$400 more BUT breeders who health test truly care about the future of the breed and are more likely to also give preventative care to breeding adults. Which means you do not bring home a new puppy that is totally infested with tapeworms/fleas because the breeder did not worm the puppies/adults as needed. Go with the breeders who cares about the breed and their dogs.
3/15/2012 11:26:09 AM

Anonymous

I want to thank you for the information. I will definately look for tested parents, as you say why take the chance on health. Beauty is one thing, without health you have nothing Carol
3/15/2012 5:34:45 PM

Anonymous

I would definately look for health tested parents, and I would also avoid breeders who tell you the dogs are examined and deemed healthy. No vet can see inside of a animal without an xray, so how can he say hips are good for example. PHPT is a disease that has a late onset around 7 to 8 yrs old in the dog, its better to make sure beforehand before breeding to know the parents do not carry the gene to pass it on. Best of luck in your search. Gloria
3/21/2012 7:10:07 AM

Anonymous

There are alot of posts on this site with Keeshonds for sale. Read them carefully and make a decision. I would go with health tested parents though, for 200 or 300 dollars more at least you have some kind of record. Knowing the parents are healthy can offer more of a guarantee that you will get a healthy puppy.To me it shows the breeder took the time and showed concern before just breeding to have a litter
3/21/2012 4:34:28 PM

Anonymous

I find these message boards amusing, the people who ask the questions gen. are looking for advice and that is a good thing but most will buy what is cheaper and think they are getting a deal until that puppy comes up ill or lame. Best of luck in your search, I bought my keeshond from someone who does health testing and when at 2 yrs old I followed up with hips and such OFA gave me a rating of excellent on his hips. So why take the chance on a puppy from untested parents. Daniel
3/23/2012 12:56:46 PM

Anonymous

I would go with health tested parents vs not. Plus I would go with sellers whose pictures of their dogs look cared for not unkept. Ones with good earset, look at thigh and tail set. If the person breeding sates they breed for show looks then look at these things.
4/1/2012 6:52:01 AM

Anonymous

I found a breeder, one who health tests. She will not have puppies probably for at least a year but I will wait. I looked at everything that was written here and did some online research. None of the puppies or adult keeshonds on this site look like show dogs, and that is the look I am going for. I learned in this process if the pedigree does not have Ch listed within the first 3 generations then you can pretty much cross that bloodline off as anything good is now gone. Thank you all for your time and considerate answers to my questions. I honestly felt this was a great learning process. Carol
4/2/2012 4:14:40 PM

Anonymous

Buy a keeshond from breeders or find a breed rescue - never stores or puppy mills. Absolutely check for hip dysplasia. This is my breed since 1966 - all you can ask for in a loving companion.
7/21/2012 12:11:43 PM

Anonymous asked:

11/15/2011 10:01:22 AM

11/15/2011 10:01:22 AM

what is the keeshond's habitat and diet?

1 Comment

Anonymous

Keeshond's love to play and don't eat much. Mine lay's out in the snow. So don't worry about it being to cold. They will not use a dog house. Eat's Purina dry dog food. Great dog, very protective of the family.
4/19/2012 1:25:41 PM

Anonymous asked:

10/19/2011 12:34:36 PM

10/19/2011 12:34:36 PM

Our Keeshond is very well housebroken, but becomes paranoid when other MALE dogs visit and will... Our Keeshond is very well housebroken, but becomes paranoid when other MALE dogs visit and will start marking territory inside. Is the paranoia a trait, or is it because he was a rescue at a young age? Other then that, our "Zero" is a great family member...allthough a little "needy" with attention..lol

1 Comment

Anonymous

Zero may just be protecting its territory. Also, he may try to be protecting the family, if he/she is very close with them.
10/25/2011 3:29:35 PM

Anonymous asked:

10/14/2011 10:26:28 AM

10/14/2011 10:26:28 AM

I will be getting a keeshond puppy for christmas. I want to train her for a service dog as I... I will be getting a keeshond puppy for christmas. I want to train her for a service dog as I have fibromyalgia that seems to be turning into MS. Will this type of dog be a good service dog? Mainly to keep me moving and to pick things up for me that I can't bend over for?

Add a Comment

Anonymous asked:

10/10/2011 2:45:46 AM

10/10/2011 2:45:46 AM

Dose a Keeshoud travel well on long trips, and in the car? Could a Keeshoud stay alone for 2/3... Dose a Keeshoud travel well on long trips, and in the car? Could a Keeshoud stay alone for 2/3 days while having someone stop by to feed, exercise them while their owners are away.

4 Comments

Anonymous

I have had Keeshonds (Keeshonden) for 33 years. Our's love to travel, even for very long distances. Most of ours did not like to stay along for long periods of time; some of them eventually got a little distructive until they were allowed more area to roam (we started out by keeping our 1st one in the bathroom when we left for short periods of time, he ate the bathroom.)
10/14/2011 1:31:12 PM

Anonymous

I have a Keeshond that I am training to be my psychiatric service dog and therapy dog. He is two years old. He is a wonderful traveller! The thing I would say is that you need to start taking your dog on short trips (this would apply to any breed) when they are very young. And you need to keep it up. It doesn't have to be a long trip either. A trip to your local coffee shop on a weekly basis will do. And they get bored easily. So make frequest potty stops on long trips and let them sniff around outside before you return to the car. I also use a CD called through a dog's ears for car riding to keep him relaxed. It does not put humans asleep! Car riding dogs can be lots of fun to take with you!
1/8/2012 10:31:13 AM

Anonymous

Keeshonds will become bored and can be destructive without that human companionship.
3/14/2012 8:12:01 AM

Anonymous

My Keeshouds were great during trips, long or short. On long trips, I would let them walk and sniff and pee on everything after about 2-3 hours. They are great travelers. I always had some toys for them to play with as well. Now that I only have one, I have only taken him on short trips. He likes his rides in the car.... I left them at a kennel with no influence on them, good or bad. But again, I had them kenneled together.... I would recommend that if you get a Keesie, have one or more animals, preferably another dog, to keep him company if away for days at a time. They are a pack/family dog. Once they accept who their family is, they will be much happier with a family member around all of the time.
5/19/2012 6:05:32 PM

Anonymous asked:

9/14/2011 11:34:26 PM

9/14/2011 11:34:26 PM

Should the coat of a keeshond be cut??

3 Comments

Anonymous

The keeshond coat keeps them warm/cool, so you don't need to, but when it gets really hot or really cold, you still need to watch them because they can overheat and get too cold. I know from my current keeshonds, that if you shave them, their fur wont grow back the same.
10/25/2011 3:28:11 PM

Anonymous

I do not shave my Keeshond. That would ruin his coat and not help keep him warm or cool. I do keep my dog in a puppy cut. That means his fur is not quite as long as an adults and it is easier to groom. I have done this since I got him two years ago and it has not ruined his coat. But a puppy cut is not a short short cut. You still need to brush it daily and get your dog professionally groomed once a month. I love the regular brushing and so does my dog!
1/8/2012 10:34:41 AM

Anonymous

No absolutely not. The keeshond's fur may not ever be the same after cutting it.
12/13/2012 12:17:42 PM

Anonymous asked:

8/12/2011 5:19:01 PM

8/12/2011 5:19:01 PM

my keeshound has been shedding for the pass 4 months, have tried deshedding brush, & just daily... my keeshound has been shedding for the pass 4 months, have tried deshedding brush, & just daily brushing, its not letting up is there something I should do

3 Comments

Anonymous

To some extent Keeshonds do shed a little each day. It is more in the spring and fall when they totally dump their undercoat. However, if you feel your dog is shedding excessively, I would take a trip to the vet to make sure there is no hormonal problems or skin issues. Keeshonden are very suseptable to skin problems due to fleas.
1/8/2012 10:37:39 AM

Anonymous

I would suspect a Thyroid problem on this one. Vet check is in order..test for PHPT, the most common thyroid issue in the breed.
4/9/2013 11:47:36 AM

Anonymous

Since I started giving my Keeshound ,Chance, treats for skin & coat along with once a week adding a teaspoon of olive oil mixed in his food,it has helped a lot. Plus when I bath him I wet him down completely and use his shedding blade while bathing him, shedding has improved greatly. Good look
1/27/2014 7:08:32 AM

Anonymous asked:

3/23/2011 3:05:28 PM

3/23/2011 3:05:28 PM

Can keeshonds run for longer periods of time? I want a life, as well as running companion; but... Can keeshonds run for longer periods of time? I want a life, as well as running companion; but sometimes my runs are an hour or longer, would the poor guy get tuckered out? I'm willing to buy the little booties, so his paw pads don't wear out...but I'm wondering about their endurance, or is it trainable?

1 Comment

Anonymous

Keeshond's, just like us, can train for long distance jogging/running. I would enlist the aid of an agility trainer to get your pet started on an exercise plan that will get him/her into condition for participating in your active lifestyle. My first Keeshond was able to walk/hike over 4 miles at age 15...she lived to be 18 1/2, over 3 years longer than average for her breed. I attribute her longevity to an active lifestyle hiking with me and maybe a little to good genes. I imagine if I'd been a jogger/runner when she was young she could've easily kept pace with me.
3/29/2011 9:01:49 AM

Anonymous asked:

3/9/2011 8:39:54 AM

3/9/2011 8:39:54 AM

My 13 year old female Keeshond has been very healthy all of her life. In the last year and a... My 13 year old female Keeshond has been very healthy all of her life. In the last year and a half she has developed some horrible skin issues. She is itchy, and bites at herself, there are crusty sores all over her, and her fur is falling out. What can cause this problem?

2 Comments

Anonymous

These can be indications of an immunological problem...typically cancer. Sometimes it's a thyroid issue. Your Keeshond needs to go to your vet for what's called a Senior Blood Profile and a CBC. This will reveal any issues with her kidneys, liver etc. as well as tell them if her white blood count is within normal range. If it's high she has an infection. Red blood count tells if there's a leakage somewhere...certain cancers actually draw blood from the system leaving your pet anemic. Please take her in to see her Vet soon.
3/29/2011 8:54:57 AM

Anonymous

You should take your Keeshond to the vet!!! That is always the best thing to do
8/8/2011 1:18:36 PM

Anonymous asked:

2/25/2011 10:42:13 AM

2/25/2011 10:42:13 AM

What is the average life span of a female Keeshond? And what works best for senior care... What is the average life span of a female Keeshond? And what works best for senior care arthritis/hip dysplasia?

4 Comments

Anonymous

Average is 12-15 years, but my first Keeshond lived 18 1/2 years. She walked and hiked with me on a regular basis and was not fed anything other than top of the line dog food. No treats, no canned foods, no human foods. She had her last professional dental cleaning at age 15 and still had all of her own teeth with no cavities, broken teeth or extractions ever having to be done.
3/29/2011 9:05:32 AM

Anonymous

My Keeshond lived to be 14
6/22/2011 4:25:01 PM

Anonymous

Our Keeshond lived to be 21. It was the best 21 years of my life. I've never had a better dog. :.)
6/30/2011 1:34:25 AM

Anonymous

My Keeshond lived to be 16 1/2 yrs old. She started going down hill at about the age of 12yrs. I moved her and myself into a much healthier environment and the last four years of her life were the best! She actually became a younger dog again with spunk and energy to play with 2 acres of land to roam. Whether it be genetics, diet & excersize, or simply the home life...she was happy for 16 1/2 yrs!
11/13/2011 4:35:08 PM

Anonymous asked:

1/29/2011 10:53:00 PM

1/29/2011 10:53:00 PM

Can Keeshond dogs live in a garage?

6 Comments

Anonymous

Why on God's green earth would you want to keep a keeshond in a garage let alone any other breed? Keeshonds are wonderful family dogs, they love to be a part of a family, if you are not willing to have a keeshond as a part of your family then please do not get one
2/7/2011 10:53:41 AM

Anonymous

AMEN, kEESHOUNDS ARE GREAT FAMILY COMPANIONS- OWNED 4 OF THAT BREED
4/18/2011 8:20:55 AM

Anonymous

My Keeshond girl is the best family dog that I have ever owned. she's protective of her family and enjoys being with us. In fact, she does not like being outside for too long. She has a great big yard that has a wall going around it, she knows that she can be in the yard, but likes to be with us more. She does however, enjoy going outside for 15 - 30 min to patrol the back yard. :) She is the best dog that has ever been part of our family, and I would rate the breed 20 out of 10!!! After having her in our lives, we are convinced that Keeshond is a wonderful breed!
6/14/2011 11:15:07 PM

Anonymous

Keeshonds still need their excersize! And if you want one why put it in your garage? You should never leave it alone. They love attention! So please don't put it in your garage.
6/22/2011 4:28:47 PM

Anonymous

Why would you get a dog only to leave them in a garage??!! That to me seems very cruel. If you have not bought one I recommend reviewing your reasons for wanting a dog before you really get one. Dogs need human companionship and interaction. A dog left in a garage all day long is a very sad animal. Please don't get a dog if you plan on leaving them in the garage!
1/8/2012 10:40:37 AM

Anonymous

Keesies are a family/pack dog. In order to remain happy and healthy, they should not be left away from their families for long periods. They should constantly feel as if they are a part of the family. Depression is very common among the breed when left alone. That is one of the main reasons they are an indoor dogs. A garage is a bad place to keep them. They may get destructive while alone and there are usually too many nasty chemicals, hoses and things like that in a garage.
5/19/2012 6:16:14 PM

Anonymous asked:

11/2/2010 7:07:43 PM

11/2/2010 7:07:43 PM

How long do you need to walk Keeshond a day? What would u rate them out of 10?

3 Comments

Anonymous

Pretty much all dogs need a brisk walk every day. They will let you know when the walk is over. Kees need their exercise like humans do. It keeps the heart strong and body in shape. NO DOG SHOULD BE OVERWEIGHT. It takes years off their lifespan.
11/8/2010 5:19:16 PM

Anonymous

I walk my Keeshond's 15 minutes first thing in the am, again at lunch and after dinner we do a 30 min walk, before bed again another 15 min. But thats just me. Other than that they have a fenced in yard with jumps to keep them active. What are you rating? For what? If its for a companion then definately a 10, for intelligence another 10, for temperment another 10. Keeshonds are wonderful, quick to learn, they love to please, they want to be a part of your life
11/10/2010 9:01:48 AM

Anonymous

I walk my Keeshond once a day as much as I can for about 20 minutes. He also gets regular training and comes with me when I leave the house so he gets exercise other ways too. But I can see the difference in him when he doesn't get that amount of exercise. He gets into trouble and gets owly (like humans I guess!)!
1/8/2012 10:42:53 AM

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