Border Collie Breeders with Puppies for Sale

Border Collie Information

Breed Group: Herding
Picture of a Border Collie

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  • Picture of a Border Collie Puppy
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  • Picture of a Border Collie Puppy
  • Picture of a Border Collie Puppy
  • Picture of a Border Collie Puppy
  • Picture of a Border Collie Puppy
  • Picture of a Border Collie Puppy
  • Picture of a Border Collie Puppy
  • Picture of a Border Collie Puppy
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Characteristics
Size:
Grooming Needs:
Exercise Needs:
Good With Dogs:
Watchdog Ability:
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Overview
Originating during the 19th century, the Border Collie was so named due to their home of development on the border of Scotland England. This breed was prized for their outstanding herding abilities of any type of livestock. Today the Border Collie is a popular farm worker, family companion, and talented show dog.
Character
The Border Collie is medium-sized, exceptionally athletic, and possesses great endurance. This breeds obsession is their livestock work. They are high energy, confident, and determined. They are light on their feet, have a flowing movement, and are extremely versatile.

Does your Border Collie bark, howl, and cry whenever you leave the house? Separation anxiety is extreme anxiety experienced by your dog when you are away from him.
Temperament
This breed is intelligent, responsive, and devoted to their master and work. The Border Collie is extremely sensitive and thrives on human interaction. They are not recommended for the novice, sedentary or apathetic dog owner or for a home with a two-career family. They do not do well if left alone for extended periods of time and will suffer separation anxiety or become destructive. Border Collies do best in a home with older considerate children. They typically get along with dogs they have been raised with but should not be in a home with cats or other small household pets. This breeds inherent work ethic will lead them to attempt to herd anything and everything that moves.
Care
The Border Collie requires weekly brushing. Special attention should be given to the coat during shedding. Bathing or dry shampooing should only be done when necessary. This breed is prone to PRA, hip dysplasia, epilepsy, deafness, Collie Eye Anomaly, and allergies to fleas.

If your dog is displaying behavior uncharacteristic of his normal actions, call the Vet.
Coat
The Border Collie comes in two coat varieties: rough or smooth. Both varieties are double coat and weather resistant and are close fitting and thick. The outer coat is either wavy or straight and coarse in texture. The under coat is dense, short, and soft. The rough coat variety has fur of medium length. The chest, forelegs, underside, and haunches are feathered. The coat on the face, front of legs, ears, and feet is smooth and short. The smooth variety has fur of short length over the entire body and there may be slight feathering on the chest, ruff, haunches, and forelegs. The color of the coat comes in all colors or combination of colors and markings. They may be solid, merle, sable, bi-color, or tri-color. Border Collies are average shedders.
Training
Early socialization and obedience are recommended. The Border Collie is easily trained and does best with praise, consistency, fairness, respect, and firmness. Due to their extremely sensitive nature this breed must never be treated in a harsh or heavy-handed manner. They are exceedingly talented in herding, police work, competitive obedience, search and rescue, Frisbee trials, and Flyball. Border Collies are also used successfully as therapy dogs and guide dogs for the blind. Teaching your dog to sit, lie down, and stay is vital to the training of your new puppy. There are several accepted methods of house training your new Border Collie puppy. Consider crate training if you need to adapt your dog to a safe and confined environment for various safety and comfort reasons.
Activity
The Border Collie has an inordinate amount of energy and requires more than physical exercise. They thrive on work, play, mental stimulation, and close contact with their owner and family. They are not recommended for apartment or city dwelling. They do best on a working farm or in a rural secluded setting where they are able to romp, run, and roam freely and safely. Socialization is one of the single most important things you can do for your puppy.
Weight
30-45 lbs
Height
Male: 20-23; Female: 18-21 inches
Color(s)
black, blue merle, and sable, marked with varying amounts of white and/or tan
Characteristics
Size:
Grooming Needs:
Exercise Needs:
Good With Dogs:
Watchdog Ability:

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Featured Border Collie Breeder

Featured Breeder of Border Collies with Puppies For Sale
Tropheous
Member Since: June 2014
Location: N/A
I have Border Collie puppies for sale! See My Profile
I fell in love with border collies in my grooming salon. I have been breeding them for 5 years now. As a groomer, the poodle was a natural choice. After 4 years of grooming and showing my special standard Nike, I bred her to a wonderful grand champion, Sir Atlas.

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About Border Collies

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Anonymous asked:
So I want to buy my first dog and I'm very interested in the Border Collie. My boyfriend and I are extremely active and the puppy would never be home by themselves. But I keep hearing such horror stories about this breed. Should I be that worried or attribute that to poor ownership? Thanks

3 Comments

Anonymous

The Border Collie is a great breed of dog for the right person, couple or family. They are extremely active and need 2 and 1/2 to 3 hours of running exercise a day. No matter what. No matter if it is raining, snowing, super hot out or if your sick. So unless you can make sure that you will always put the dog's needs before your own, this is not the breed for you. They are very intelligent and can/will get out to go running on their own if they are left alone too long without exercise. They can become destructive if they are not trained and exercised. As long as you can commit to 3 hours of dog-time a day at least, plus training classes; then go for it! If not, you may want to look at rescuing an older Border Collie, a cross or a different breed altogether.

Anonymous

I have bred Border Collies a long time, have pups all over the world doing amazing jobs. While I agree with the comment about consistency in exercise, I believe there misunderstanding out there about this breed I love and know so well. They are extremely intelligent, intuitive, understand a huge vocabulary, and can be trained in a matter of a day or two in basic obedience. Like an extremely smart child that gets bored in school and misbehaves, yes they WILL find an outlet on their own if their needs aren't met! Yes, they will get destructive! You have to consider the bloodlines of the pup, understand that strong working lines going back many generations represent a pup that should be working a ranch. Not the right fit for you. When I breed a litter, I determine which pups are most suitable for different pursuits. I have many pups that went on to be therapy dogs because of their calm, social nature. I have many that I knew were best suited for herding, and would ONLY place them in an environment where that was how they would spend most of their time. However, if I got an application from you, like 80% are, I would be able to pick a few pups that would fit your situation perfectly. I would want to know what you mean by active? Though someone is home all day, what will they be doing with the dog? They by far need MENTAL stimulation. They have a genetic disposition to herd that must be met. Mental stimulation can be as simple as playing frisbee, ball play. Engage mind and body. I have customers that set up their own agility course in the backyard! They can be awesome pets, you need to find a knowledgeable breeder with proven lines, Many references that can attest to their dog's temperament as suitable for a great pet. I have rescued many that were mixed with another breed and spent years training them before I would place them with no concerns. Rescues are a risk, you don't know what you are getting. They can be the best dog on earth (many ARE), or have baggage and genetics you have no clue about. Overall, this is an amazing breed that I could give you 100s of references that would attest are the best pet they have ever had. But as the other person said, there is a commitment required to educate yourself, dedicate to meeting their needs (I don't agree with running 3 hrs a day, I am sorry that is useless if their mind isn't stimulated), training, and seeking creative outlets for their herding instinct. Look into obedience, agility, or herding classes. Train them as therapy dogs And take them for a run and some frisbee. ABCA dogs tend to be working lines, AKC dogs tend to have lines more suitable as pets in general.

Anonymous

I would definitely agree with this breeeders bc comment. Border Collies are the greatest breed out there, (in my opinion) but they definitely need some sort of "job" to be happy and not get themselves into trouble trying to find there own "job" (because they will do that). A border collie can excel at anything they put their mind too. They definitely need that mental and physical stimulation to thrive.

Anonymous asked:
Are Border Collies easy to train?

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Anonymous asked:
Do Border Collies shed?

2 Comments

Anonymous

Yes, the Border Collie breed does shed. They are considered a 4/5 on the shedding scale. They would need to be brushed twice to three times a week to keep shedding at bay.

Anonymous

Short coat Border Collies shed a great deal. I have raised and bred very high pedigree rough (long) coats for many years. They do not shed a great deal. They mat up in their undercoat and need to be brushed once a week to prevent big knots / matting, as well as to keep the coat shiny and healthy.

Anonymous asked:
I just bought a male Border Collie puppy who is 2 and a half months old. I have had him about 1 month and he continues to bite everything. I cannot hold him without him biting me. He tears up the rugs, shoes, everything in sight. I swat him with a rolled up newspaper and tell him "No!". What is the problem here? My next issue is he knows where the potty pads in the kitchen are and will poop and pee there but he finds a way to pee on the carpet/floor. When he goes on his pads, I praise him. When he goes on the carpet I grab him put him on the pad tell him you go potty here! What's it going to take to stop these two problems?

9 Comments

Anonymous

First off - NEVER hit your dog. He is a puppy and he has no idea what hitting means. Secondly, you got your Border Collie way too young. Puppies should not be without their mothers until they are at least 8 weeks old. So you got your puppy right at weaning time, which means he never learned bite inhibition from his/her siblings and mother, and he never learned how to be a dog by watching his mother. For the biting and chewing, you need to get him some fun chews to play with. Antler's, nylabones, and raw-frozen beef bones are the best. Set your puppy up for success, do not allow him to be unsupervised, he needs to be on a leash attached to you at all times in the house unless he is in a crate or in a part of the house that he is blocked off from.

Anonymous

As for the potty training, you have to use positive reinforcement training methods. Do not yell at your Border Collie, he has no idea and your tone of voice is telling him that it is bad to use the puppy pads because that's when you are yelling at him. If he makes a mess in the house, use an enzyme cleaner such as Nature's Miracle. This will clean the soiled area and take away the scent on the puppy's level. With normal household cleaner's, he can still smell his pee/poop. Now, have a timer go off every 2 hours during the day and take him outside or to the pad to use the toilet. Praise him and give him treats when he does. He shouldn't have accidents now if he is blocked off in his own space, in a crate or attached to you all day.

Anonymous

Swatting your puppy is healthy as long as the punishment is appropriate for their size and age. Even the Mother snaps and nips at the pups. Always associate a word with the punishment so they can learn its result is bad! Biting is a stage yes you got it early but encourage chewing on hard chew bones and punish for things not chewable. Remember puppies are like little children, they only learn what you teach them or they will teach themselves bad habits

Anonymous

I disagree about swatting and shock collars. As long as you are training and not beating/torturing the dogs they are effective training methods to show certain actions aren't acceptable. As you said, the other person said biting is a stage all puppies go through and without brothers and sisters biting her back she won't realize when playing is overdoing it. A small swat on the nose (not hard) or sticking your finger that she's biting slowly to the back of her throat will cause her to gag and they will get the picture that it's not fun or enjoyable to chew fingers. Border Collies are extremely intelligent dogs. Potty training can take up to 4-6 months to be consistent and there could be occasional accidents after that. Again they are intelligent so if you leave them in the house all day. Imagine leaving a six-year-old by themselves all day without television, you're going to come home to a mess and when you are there they will act out to get attention.

Anonymous

Would you swat your child for teething? No you'd give the baby a toy to chew on. Same thing for a puppy.

Anonymous

You do not have to hit the dog to get him or her to understand what the proper behavior is especially a Border Collie. I am on my second dog and a more obedient, responsive dog would be hard to find. If you hit, you are just displaying your lack of control.

Anonymous

Never use harsh methods or physical punishment with a Border Collie. Use very consistent, one-word commands and do it the same every time. This includes body/hand movements, eye movement. Borders are extremely intuitive, intelligent, and sensitive. They can understand a huge vocabulary. Being so intelligent, I have had pups/dogs (especially males) that simply do not want to listen to you. Consistency is the key with a Border Collie. A well-bred pup can be trained in 2 days, and I have 100s of customers that have reported such of the pups I have bred.

Anonymous

BC's are not to be swatted, hit, slapped, or struck. They are far too intelligent of a breed and will hold a grudge. Be firm and don't allow hand play. You must be the alpha in your pack. Consistency is everything. Pee pads teach the BC it's OK to relieve themselves indoors which it is not. If you can't dedicate the time to properly train an intelligent dog, get a cat. Most BC's are capable of understanding of up to 250 commands. Since you don't know what you're doing, get into the nearest class before you become frustrated and the BC ends up in a rescue.

Anonymous

My Border Collie responds to "bad dog". That's more than enough punishment for him, He's super smart and a real lover. He loves to play ball, tug of war and frisbee. He gets sleepy around 10 pm and goes up to our bedroom where he has his bed and goes to sleep. He jumps on the bed in the morning to love my wife first, then when she gets up he comes over to me to love me. One could not have a better companion.

Anonymous asked:
I'm looking to buy an almost all white Border Collie. The mother is deaf and the owner says the puppies can hear and see. Should I buy one of these puppies?

4 Comments

Anonymous

The white gene in the Border Collie causes deafness. If the puppies are hearing tested, then that's good. But they can still go deaf later on in their lives. It is a risk.

Anonymous

There is a test called the BAER test (brain stem auditory evoked response) which will test the pup's hearing.

Anonymous

A breeder who would breed a deaf dog is not responsible. You should steer clear of that puppy and especially that dog breeder.

Anonymous

Mostly white Border Collies are a risk for deafness genetically. This is a commonly known fact. If the mother is deaf, absolutely do not buy. The more white, the higher the risk and more assessment needed. I agree, anyone that would breed a deaf dog is not fit to even be called a breeder and is highly unethical and uneducated. She probably has no knowledge of genetics which is critical to being a good breeder of quality dogs. Breeders' goal should be to improve the breed, and nothing else. Not money. This is an uneducated person that gives all good breeders a bad rep. She is diminishing the breed by propagating a genetic default, and a serious one at that. That deaf dog should be spayed and loved, but not bred.

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Updated: 8/28/2016