Australian Shepherd Breeders with Puppies for Sale

Australian Shepherd Information

Breed Group: Herding
Picture of an Australian Shepherd

Australian Shepherd Puppy Pictures

  • Breed Standard Picture for Australian Shepherds
  • Picture of an Australian Shepherd Puppy
  • Picture of an Australian Shepherd Puppy
  • Picture of an Australian Shepherd Puppy
  • Picture of an Australian Shepherd Puppy
  • Picture of an Australian Shepherd Puppy
  • Picture of an Australian Shepherd Puppy
  • Picture of an Australian Shepherd Puppy
  • Picture of an Australian Shepherd Puppy
  • Picture of an Australian Shepherd Puppy
  • Picture of an Australian Shepherd Puppy
  • Picture of an Australian Shepherd Puppy

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Characteristics
Size:
Grooming Needs:
Exercise Needs:
Good With Dogs:
Watchdog Ability:
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Overview
The exact origin of the Australian Shepherd is not known. The breed that is cherished and loved today was developed exclusively in the United States. The Australian Shepherd has an innate versatility that makes them useful on ranches and farms as a herding dog, retriever, and watchdog. They are typically referred to as "The Aussie".
Character
The Australian Shepherds most identifiable characteristic is the natural or docked bobtail. Their eyes are one of this breeds most commented on feature. Their eyes come in a variety of colors or color combinations and include blue, amber, hazel, and all shades of brown. The Aussie is a vigorous and athletic breed.

Does your Australian Shepherd bark, howl, and cry whenever you leave the house? Separation anxiety is extreme anxiety experienced by your dog when you are away from him.
Temperament
Australian Shepherds are intelligent, delightful, and loyal. They are highly energetic and thrive on being given something to do. The Aussie has a high degree of intensity and a "no-quit" attitude. Their herding instinct may be problematic or annoying to their family, as this breed will often attempt to perform this task on everyone or anything that moves. They are reserved and cautious with strangers until the Aussie decides about them. They are confident and protective. Human companionship is crucial to this breed. They get along well with active, considerate older children. The Aussie is not typically aggressive to other dogs.
Care
The Australian Shepherd requires minimal grooming. An occasional brushing with a firm bristle brush will suffice. It is important to do more in depth grooming when they are going through their seasonal shedding. Bathing should only be done when absolutely necessary. The Aussie is susceptible to a myriad of health issues and concerns. Their merle coloration carries a blind/deaf factor. Natural bobtails may have serious spinal defects. They are also prone to epilepsy, hip dysplasia, and cataracts.

If your dog is displaying behavior uncharacteristic of his normal actions, call the Vet.
Coat
The Australian Shepherd has a striking and varied coat. It is of moderate length, straight to wavy, and weather resistant. The under coat is shed twice a year; with moderate shedding between these periods. The coat comes in four accepted colors: black, blue merle, red, and red merle. A variety of white and tan markings may appear on the face, chest, front, and rear legs.
Training
Australian Shepherds are easy to train. They benefit from early socialization and very basic obedience. It is important that they know who the master is or they will attempt to take control. The Australian Shepherd requires firm, fair, consistent, and effective direction. Their high intelligence and keen learning ability make repetitive training boring. Teaching your dog to sit, lie down, and stay is vital to the training of your new puppy. There are several accepted methods of house training your new Australian Shepherd puppy. Consider crate training if you need to adapt your dog to a safe and confined environment for various safety and comfort reasons.
Activity
The Australian Shepherd requires an inordinate amount of exercise. A mere walk is not sufficient. They thrive on running, herding, playing, and all family activities. They are at their best when they are given a great deal of social interaction and a task to do. Australian Shepherds are not recommended for apartment dwelling. They are moderately active indoors and require a non-sedentary owner and a large securely fenced yard or safe open area. Socialization is one of the single most important things you can do for your puppy.
Weight
Male: 50-65; Female: 40-55 lbs
Height
Male: 20-23; Female: 18-21 inches
Color(s)
blue merle, black, red merle, or red, all with or without white markings and/or tan points
Characteristics
Size:
Grooming Needs:
Exercise Needs:
Good With Dogs:
Watchdog Ability:

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Featured Australian Shepherd Breeder

Featured Breeder of Australian Shepherds with Puppies For Sale
A Thousand Hills Kennel
Member Since: September 2004
Location: Athens, Georgia
I have Australian Shepherd puppies for sale! See My Profile
Thousand Hills is known for intelligent, athletic, healthy, happy aussies. We have recently found a new passion and love in the wonderful world of papillons! We are proud to announce our beautiful new litter! We have 3 males ready for their forever families.

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About Australian Shepherds

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Anonymous asked:
We got our Australian puppy at 6 weeks old with ears lying down. As the months went by (she's six months old now) the ears are now standing straight up. How common is this?

1 Comment

Anonymous

Puppies should not leave their mothers until they are 8 - 10 weeks of age. Getting a puppy so early (right at weaning time) means that the puppy does not have the ability to learn how to be a well mannered dog by interacting with his/her mother and litter mates. Ears that stand up are not common at all in the Australian Shepherd breed and are not allowed in the standard. For this to happen, it is either a genetic fault in the breeding line or the dog is not purebred. Contact your breeder and ask for the information of the other puppy owners and contact them; ask if their pups' ears are standing up or not. If you do not have the paper work that says your puppy is a purebred, it means that it most likely isn't and is a mix.

Anonymous asked:
Are these dogs okay being home for 6-8 hours a day?

3 Comments

Anonymous

The main thing about owning this breed of dog is exercise, exercise, and more exercise. A tired dog is a good dog and a tired dog will be calm and quiet while their owner is away during the day. If they are exercised twice a day, an hour in the morning and an hour at night then they would be fine as an adult being home for that period of time. But you may want to look into something like a Doggy Day Care so your dog doesn't have to be alone all day and can have fun, play and socialize while you are at work.

Anonymous

Also make sure that you leave him/her toys to play with just in case. Mine loves tennis balls made by Kong.

Anonymous

The answer to your question is, most likely, yes. But as said above, they need more exercise than certain other breeds so you should be willing to give them exercise before you leave home and after you return. You will frequently hear that if they do not have a "job" to do, they will create one. That can be a problem if the job they create is destructive. But you can avoid that by not giving them free reign of your house when you're not home (until you are comfortable that they will be okay on their own). You can kennel them or give them a room to stay in (baby gates work wonders). If you can afford doggy day care that is certainly also an option, and it doesn't have to be daily. Also, if you can get involved in training with them, whether for obedience, rally, agility or some other sport, that is a great way for them to let off some steam and it's a great way for you to make new friends and socialize.

Anonymous asked:
I have been looking into getting an Australian Shepard. I have read that they need a job and I understand that they are not couch potatoes. However, I was wondering how much time and activities they would need. I understand that dogs have different personalities and dispositions. If I did indeed get an Aussie, I would have a fenced in yard and I would train it to be out near the barn with me. I show a horse and I also show boer goats, I spend 1/2-1 hour night and morning doing chores and some time in between, it would be out at this time. So it would not be the center of attention the full time I was with it, but I would be able to give it full attention at other times. I understand it would have to be trained to suit my needs. Do you think this type of environment would suit an Aussie or would it be better to pick a different breed of dog or perhaps a mix?

5 Comments

Anonymous

The Australian Shepherd would do perfectly fine on your farm, hanging out with you while doing chores. As long as you worked with the dog not to chase your animals and to keep his/her prey drive in check. The Australian Shepherd needs an average of 2 - 2 1/2 of running exercise a day. So if you go on trail rides, your dog can trot along with you. However, throwing a ball with a chuck-it while you are out doing chores throughout the day is also a good way to exercise your dog. Just make sure that the dog is well trained around your animals, and he/she will do fine.

Anonymous

I have to say that what distinguishes an Australian Shepherds personality from some of the other herding dogs, say border collies, is that although they do love to be facilitated into play, or competitive events such as agility, their main drive is to BE WITH YOU. I'm sure you've heard of the saying "velcro" Aussie, and that is so very true. An Aussie's first and foremost need is to be with their owner. This need is greater than any other instinctual drive in Australian Shepherds. There are great variances in the level of activity of this line. There are several lineages of Aussies that are known to have a greater need to work than other lineages of Aussies. Make sure you speak with your perspective breeder about what they primarily breed for. In other words, some breeders focus solely on herding, and will only breed their stock to try to improve on the herding drive of their dogs. Other folks will focus on different aspects, such as a milder temperament, or conformation, and still yet others are focused on a combination of great looks, medium work drive, and preserving the integrity of the breed, in essence, trying to capture a bit of all that makes Aussies awesome. Decide what is most important to you, then read through the adds, generally, they will give you your first glimpse into the "type" of Aussie the breeder is breeding.

Anonymous

An Australian Shepard can do really well on a farm, so long as you train it to do or not to certain things. You must remember that these dogs were bread to heard other animals so unless you train him/her to stay close to you. There is a good chance that he/she will try to heard your horses. I have seen an Australian Shepard get kicked by horse because he tried to heard it. (This dog was not trained.) My dog is trained and does well around horses.

Anonymous

Aussies love to help you with chores! That would be a great job. You still will have to dedicate time most days to work on basic obedience. Also, the most important thing you could do is socialize your Aussie. When your dog is between 12-16 weeks old, it's important to have them meet 100 people plus lots of other animals. We have made the mistake of not socializing enough and they can get pretty aggressive. I have been around quite a few Aussies and Border Collies. I prefer Aussies because most of them are content to follow you around while many Border Collies tend to run off. My Aussies live to help with chores! You would probably be most happy with a medium drive Aussie. Some good breeders are Mill Iron R, Bayouland, McMatt, Copperridge, Lyric, Catalina, and Akilah Aussies.

Anonymous

As most of the others have said, your situation sounds perfectly appropriate for an Aussie. I would suggest that if you don't want it for herding purposes, you might want to look for a puppy that does not come from working lines. They often have much stronger herding instincts and much higher drive. Many breeders who breed for conformation will have several puppies in the litter that are not show quality but are beautiful Aussies who would be perfect as family pets or for performance sports (i.e. agility, flyball, obedience, rally). They are usually totally devoted to their family so they are pretty velcro (they stick by you). They are always checking in with you and want to be with you as much as you'll let them. Another nice thing about Aussies is that they are generally a very healthy breed and have a long life span.

Anonymous asked:
I am thinking about buying a puppy and a kitten for my fiance to raise both of them together. Is this a good idea in general and if so is the Australian Shepherd a good breed to consider?

2 Comments

Anonymous

Raising one baby is hard enough, raising two can be extremely difficult/tiresome. Unless your fiance does not work or has an extreme amount of free-time, I would suggest bringing one in first and the other in later on when the animal has already settled in. The Australian Shepherd is a wonderful breed of dog, however, they are known for having an extreme prey drive. Since they are a herding breed, they tend to chase after small animals such as cats. But if the pup is socialized to cats at an early age, then the dog should be fine. I would suggest getting the kitten first and then the pup. Or getting the pup and socializing the pup to cats as much as possible and then bringing in the kitten when the dog is about 6 months old.

Anonymous

I agree with the above statement. Cats first dog second. Plus you will have to do some training with them, to teach them that chasing cats is not ok. If you can do all this, then you should see a bit of a friendship between them. Our cats love our Australian Shepherd, he has even saved one of them from a fox.

Anonymous asked:
We have had Aussies for over 60 years. We had one mini and he was so vicious that we had to have him put down by a court order. It was when they were first developing the breed. Do they still have that vicious tendency?

3 Comments

Anonymous

I'm sorry to hear about your dog. The mini's I have come in contact with have not been aggressive in any way. However, a friend of mine whom is a breeder of mini's has told me that because of their popularity, some lines can be aggressive because some breeders just want a dog to make puppies and are not breeding for the right reasons. Look for a reputable, responsible, and knowledgeable breeder and meet the dogs face to face, ask to meet previous puppies and get to know the sire and dam. That should help you with your comfort level when it comes to the breed.

Anonymous

Having been involved with Aussies since 1958, let me fill you in. A mini is not a true Australian Shepherd and one should not be judged by qualities of the other.

Anonymous

A mini "Aussie" is not actually an Australian shepherd. Many of them are even a mix of random breeds and aren't even purebreds. It's important to find a reputable, show breeder. A show breeder will likely call them by the name of "Minature American Sheoherds." As long as you properly socialize your Minature American Shepherd, you shouldn't have problems if you get the right lines.

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Updated: 7/23/2016