Australian Shepherd Breeders with Puppies for Sale

Australian Shepherd Breed Information

Breed Group: Herding
Australian Shepherd

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Weight
Male: 50-65; Female: 40-55 lbs
Height
Male: 20-23; Female: 18-21 inches
Color(s)
blue merle, black, red merle, or red, all with or without white markings and/or tan points
Overview
The exact origin of the Australian Shepherd is not known. The breed that is cherished and loved today was developed exclusively in the United States. The Australian Shepherd has an innate versatility that makes them useful on ranches and farms as a herding dog, retriever, and watchdog. They are typically referred to as "The Aussie".
Character
The Australian Shepherds most identifiable characteristic is the natural or docked bobtail. Their eyes are one of this breeds most commented on feature. Their eyes come in a variety of colors or color combinations and include blue, amber, hazel, and all shades of brown. The Aussie is a vigorous and athletic breed.
Temperament
Australian Shepherds are intelligent, delightful, and loyal. They are highly energetic and thrive on being given something to do. The Aussie has a high degree of intensity and a "no-quit" attitude. Their herding instinct may be problematic or annoying to their family, as this breed will often attempt to perform this task on everyone or anything that moves. They are reserved and cautious with strangers until the Aussie decides about them. They are confident and protective. Human companionship is crucial to this breed. They get along well with active, considerate older children. The Aussie is not typically aggressive to other dogs.
Care
The Australian Shepherd requires minimal grooming. An occasional brushing with a firm bristle brush will suffice. It is important to do more in depth grooming when they are going through their seasonal shedding. Bathing should only be done when absolutely necessary. The Aussie is susceptible to a myriad of health issues and concerns. Their merle coloration carries a blind/deaf factor. Natural bobtails may have serious spinal defects. They are also prone to epilepsy, hip dysplasia, and cataracts.
Coat
The Australian Shepherd has a striking and varied coat. It is of moderate length, straight to wavy, and weather resistant. The under coat is shed twice a year; with moderate shedding between these periods. The coat comes in four accepted colors: black, blue merle, red, and red merle. A variety of white and tan markings may appear on the face, chest, front, and rear legs.
Training
Australian Shepherds are easy to train. They benefit from early socialization and very basic obedience. It is important that they know who the master is or they will attempt to take control. The Australian Shepherd requires firm, fair, consistent, and effective direction. Their high intelligence and keen learning ability make repetitive training boring.
Activity
The Australian Shepherd requires an inordinate amount of exercise. A mere walk is not sufficient. They thrive on running, herding, playing, and all family activities. They are at their best when they are given a great deal of social interaction and a task to do. Australian Shepherds are not recommended for apartment dwelling. They are moderately active indoors and require a non-sedentary owner and a large securely fenced yard or safe open area.
Ownership
Help reduce the number of Australian Shepherd puppies in shelters by doing your due diligence. Many puppies are often purchased with little or no knowledge of what goes into parenting one. Uneducated decisions often leave the puppy in need of adoption and in the care of rescue groups. Bringing home a puppy into your family has many benefits but we first implore you to educate yourself. An informed decision will take into account the characteristics of the breed, your lifestyle, expected veterinary care, the demands and limitations of owning one, their activity requirements and levels of companionship required.
Characteristics
Size:
Grooming Needs:
Exercise Needs:
Good With Dogs:
Watchdog Ability:

Featured Australian Shepherd Breeder

Timberline Kennel
Member Since: October 2004
Location: Joplin, Missouri
I have Australian Shepherd puppies for sale! See My Profile
We are proud to raise these highly intelligent, beautiful, devoted & loyal dogs. Timberline Kennel stands for Quality, Healthy, Happy, Well-Socialized & Clean Miniature Aussie puppies. All dogs & puppies are on a very strict medical policy, Also all puppies come with a writeen guarentee, & are micro...

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About Australian Shepherds

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Anonymous asked:

3/5/2015 5:51:56 AM

3/5/2015 5:51:56 AM

We have had Aussies for over 60 years. We had one mini and he was so vicious that we had to have him put down by a court order. It was when they were first developing the breed. Do they still have that vicious tendency?

1 Comment

Anonymous

I'm sorry to hear about your dog. The mini's I have come in contact with have not been aggressive in any way. However, a friend of mine whom is a breeder of mini's has told me that because of their popularity, some lines can be aggressive because some breeders just want a dog to make puppies and are not breeding for the right reasons. Look for a reputable, responsible, and knowledgeable breeder and meet the dogs face to face, ask to meet previous puppies and get to know the sire and dam. That should help you with your comfort level when it comes to the breed.
3/5/2015 9:26:12 AM

Anonymous asked:

2/11/2015 2:30:41 PM

2/11/2015 2:30:41 PM

I read on this site that Blue & Purina Dog Food is not as Healthy as claimed so then what foods are recommended ? The last dog we had was a Siberian Husky that we fed California Natural that we got from our vet & I don't think he carries that anymore & he doesn't carry puppy food so what puppy foods are the Best ?

2 Comments

Anonymous

A high quality, grain-free puppy food is the best thing to feed your puppy. Brands to look into are Acana, Orijen, Taste of the Wild, Wild Callings, Evo, Blue Bluffalo Grain-Free, Merrick, Wellness Core and Wysong are all great brands to look into. Here is a link that will help you in finding the best quality food for your dog. http://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/best-dog-foods/best-grain-free-dog-foods/best-grain-free-dog-foods-dry/
2/11/2015 5:44:32 PM

Anonymous

I would disagree on Blue Buffalo being a great brand like they advertise it. A friend of mine is an animal nutritionist and feed scientist from K-State. She did research on Blue Buffalo. Not only with they charge you an arm and a leg for their product, there are actually, nutritionally speaking, better brands out there. Diamond is a really good one and if you have a co-op somewhere near you, Hunters Special is excellent, one of the best. Regardless of what brand you go with, make sure the first ingredient on the bag is a bone-meal base or meat base, this is the source of protein. Active dogs need this protein to stay healthy. Try to stay away from dog food whose main ingredients are plant-based or grain-based.
2/12/2015 5:06:56 PM

Anonymous asked:

2/10/2015 1:48:54 PM

2/10/2015 1:48:54 PM

At what age does one replace Puppy Food with an adult form? We have an Australian Shepherd that was born June 18th 2014 & we have fed him Blue Buffalo Life Protection Puppy Formula with Life Sourse Bits (which is cold pressed probiotics) but can't remember when we should start mixing with adult food. Can you please shed some light on this for us?

1 Comment

Anonymous

On average you will change a dog from puppy food to adult food at one year of age. Small breeds can be moved over at 8 months and giant breeds need puppy food until they are about a year and a half to two years old. For your Australian Shepherd, when he turns a year old, he can be switched over.
2/10/2015 4:58:51 PM

Anonymous asked:

9/4/2014 12:48:40 PM

9/4/2014 12:48:40 PM

How do Austrailian Shepherds fair with rabbits? I have a 2 year old Holland/Meissner mix lop earred rabbit. She is about 6.5 lbs and loves dogs! I recently had to put down my 16 year old lab/shepherd mix and was wondering if anyone has had any experiance raising an Austrailian Shepherd wih rabbits...

2 Comments

Anonymous

First of all, I'm sorry for your loss. If your rabbit is a house rabbit and you allow her to run about the house, or have a room to herself, the first thing to do is to make sure she has a place to hide. Now, it's time to do some research. Understand that the Australian Shepherd is a herding dog and does have a prey drive. So, you will have to do some socializing and training with your new dog. If you decide to get a puppy, do introductions slowly, controlled and on the bunny's terms. However, if you decide to adopt/rescue an adult dog. Again, all the introductions must be slow and controlled. Using positive reinforcement training, you shouldn't have an issue. But please don't allow your new dog/puppy to be alone with the rabbit at anytime. Unless you trust the dog completely, you always want to put the safety of your rabbit first.
9/4/2014 3:50:41 PM

Anonymous

My Australian Shepherd Died yesterday, and that is why I am on this site, and he LOVED MY RABBIT, They would sleep together, they would do alot together.
2/21/2015 6:51:45 PM

Anonymous asked:

6/21/2014 12:21:12 AM

6/21/2014 12:21:12 AM

What is the price of a 99 % Australian Shepherd white female w/blue eyes What is the price of a 99 % Australian Shepherd white female w/blue eyes and good hearing too

4 Comments

Anonymous

A white Australian shepherd with blue eyes is a genetic defect caused by the breeding of two merles together and creates a double merle aussie that should not be bred on purpose. Those dogs are usually disposed of at birth. Rescues usually try to get a hold of them and find them new homes. I have rescued two and one of them is almost completely blind. The majority of those puppies do have hearing and seeing issues. If you are looking for contact rescues but do not ever purchase one from a breeder! Poet's Vision is a good rescue. Australian Shepherd Furever is another one.
6/23/2014 11:22:15 AM

Anonymous

Excessively white aussies are usually genetically messed up. White Aussies come from a result of breeding two Merle colored aussies together. 1/4 of white aussies are born blind and/or deaf. White is not a reconized coat pattern in aussies. They just aren't supposed to be that way! If you want to adopt one from the shelter that is great! You would be saving a life and your dog would be well priced. Never buy a white Aussie from a breeder! The breeder either doesn't know what they are doing, and breeding requires a LOT of knowledge so there are other big mistakes they have made. OR they don't care about the dog, knowing they can charge more and pretend they are some "rare type of Aussie"
6/24/2014 11:02:24 PM

Anonymous

One thing that was not mentioned in the other 2 answers is that not only is blindness and deafness a factor but most will have internal issues too. It's what you don't see that you should be concerned about. I had a friend who adopted one at 8 weeks and the dog had several health issues and had to be put to sleep before he was 2 years old. Also white Aussies with solid white ears on both the inside flap and outside flap of ear are almost always 100% deaf.
9/7/2014 8:54:40 PM

Anonymous

Don't know of the price to purchase but the cost of owning the dog will probably be high. White ears inside and outside of ear flap is almost always 100% deaf. Unfortunately the problems you don't see (internal) can be costly!
3/28/2015 9:00:11 PM

Anonymous asked:

3/21/2014 11:23:30 PM

3/21/2014 11:23:30 PM

What is the average cost of a mini Australian Shepherd? We are interested in buying a male miniature Australian Shepherd and we would like to know an average cost.

2 Comments

Anonymous

The average cost of mini Australian shepherd is about $500
4/13/2014 10:15:17 PM

Anonymous

Most Mini's are around the $500 to $650. range. Please remember that MInis are not a recognized breed by the AKC standards. They have come about by breeding runt to runt to runt. In other words defect to defect to defect. The average life span of a full sized Aussie is 13 -15 years the Minis are considerable less at 9 years.
9/7/2014 8:57:55 PM

Anonymous asked:

8/18/2013 5:54:02 PM

8/18/2013 5:54:02 PM

miniature australian shepherds(: do miniature australian shepherds shed alot?

4 Comments

Anonymous

All herding breeds shed year round, weekly brushing and a bath every few months helps. However understand they are not hypo allergenic, and a good lint roller is essential. Also ,They are not recognized by A.S.C.A. and are called the North American Shepherd or American Shepherd by A.K.C.
11/24/2013 10:58:02 PM

Anonymous

Yes, Miniature Australian Shepherds shed all year long. We have 2 Aussies inside and keep them shaved most of the time. Shaving does help.
12/22/2014 10:58:38 AM

Anonymous

Shaving will help, however, you MUST remember that Aussies are a two-coat dog breed. They have a top coat and a bottom coat. The under-coat is what is being shed, however, I would advise against shaving your Aussies if they are outside AT ALL during the year. Shaving them removes their thick protection in the winter months AND removes any sort of relief in the summer months. Their under coat actually acts as an insulator during the summer and keeps hot air out and away from their body, keeping their body temperature to normal levels. If you shave their coat, YOU ARE IN DANGER OF OVERHEATING YOUR DOG IN THE SUMMER!
2/12/2015 5:11:28 PM

Anonymous

I have a 5 year old blue merle Aussie. I agree with the other person here as far as NOT SHAVING your Aussie... NEVER,, My "SKYE" gets sunburnt on his nose a lot.. and it looks very painful...Well that is just his nose...imagine their pain if all of their fur were to be shaved off....That is just pure ignorance to do so,,,(sorry) U need to get some books.. and find these things out before U ever buy any dog. I had never seen an Aussie before I found my "baby blue eyes".. I am so thankful that I did my research before I bought him. They DO grab your heart at first glance.
3/27/2015 8:59:51 PM

Anonymous asked:

3/1/2013 8:58:20 PM

3/1/2013 8:58:20 PM

I live in an area with foxtail grass. any problem with feet?

2 Comments

Anonymous

No problems with feet, if any problems would occur, it might be with the eyes. Foxtail when headed out can be hard on any animals eyes. Aussy's are very hardy dogs and have few problems.
6/27/2013 5:49:34 PM

Anonymous

Foxtails can work their way in between toes of any breed, keep the hair on feet trimmed short so they can be checked easily.
11/24/2013 10:59:46 PM

Anonymous asked:

2/21/2013 10:15:55 PM

2/21/2013 10:15:55 PM

Size My Australian Shepherd puppy is 14 weeks old 13.3lbs. His mom is standrad, dad is min, how big do you think he will be? I have papers on him so I know he is full blood just trying see about how big he will be when grown

2 Comments

Anonymous

Which registry is he regestered in? A reputable registry would not register him. A mini Aussie is not a true Aussie. A mini Aussie is a breed that just looks similar to the Aussie but smaller, like the American shepherd. Or a mix of breeds that look Aussie-like. A reputable registry like AKC or ASCA would not register him. Certain registeries would but it doesn't mean anything. They will register cross breeds and things.
6/24/2014 11:27:08 PM

Anonymous

If he has anything other than standard Aussie, ASCA WILL NOT recognize him as he would be considered a mutt in their standards.
2/12/2015 5:12:30 PM

Anonymous asked:

2/3/2013 9:17:22 AM

2/3/2013 9:17:22 AM

How long do Australian Shepherds live

5 Comments

Anonymous

The average lifespan of the Australian Shepherd would be about 12-14 years. However, much of this depends on the bloodline of the dog (genetic) and the environmental factors such as diet and health care. Over vaccination and feeding a low quality diet can shorten the life of an otherwise long lived dog. Same for exposure to toxins and other unhealthy factors.
2/22/2013 10:58:55 AM

Anonymous

My Australian Shepherd just passed away at 15. She was amazing!
5/3/2013 9:20:48 AM

Anonymous

Australian Shepherds often live 12-15 years. It really depends on things like how well they are cared for, etc. Things that will help your dog live longer include: How much positive attention, play, exercise they get. (Like humans, dog need quality of life. With out attention and exercise, dog WILL become stressed and stress is not good for their body.) Also, it is important to feed dogs quality food so they get the nutrition they need. Most dog food brands have very little nutrition in them. Foods such as Purina and Blue are not actually very healthy as they claim.) It is very good to take your dog to the vet for check ups yearly. That way you're able to catch problems before they get very bad and could possibly be life threating. Keeping your dog in a clean environment and keeping him fit is also so important. There is so much you can do to help your dog live his full potential:) Hope this helps!!
11/10/2013 11:11:25 PM

Anonymous

On average Aussies live 12-14 years. Most of mine have made it to 14-16, I did have one live 19 1/2 yrs.
11/24/2013 11:01:33 PM

Anonymous

Just as others have said the average Aussie life span is 12-15 years however I know of Aussie who have lived to 16 and 17 years. Again their health and the care and nutrition they receive is extremely important for a long life. I just wanted to add that the life expectancy of a Mini- Aussie is much shorter. 8-10 years is an average. Why anyone would want to make this fantastic breed small is beyond me. Remember to get a "Mini" people have bred runt to runt to runt... Unfortunately runts have health issues so those are also being passed. If you notice a lot of Toy or Mini Aussies look like a long haired Chihuahua. They don't resemble the true Australian Shepherd.
3/26/2014 2:55:11 PM

Anonymous asked:

1/7/2013 1:58:01 PM

1/7/2013 1:58:01 PM

I raise sm. to med. parrots. How "safe" is Aussie w/birds in total proximity? Both my G. Shep. and G. Retrievers have always been terrific (when trained), but I'm wanting a smaller dog...

4 Comments

Anonymous

Dogs are predators and birds display behaviors that may trigger that instinct. Aussies have a better chance of being raised, trained and socialized to be safe with small animals and birds than some breeds, but I would still never leave ANY dog unattended with birds or small pets. Even a dog that has been good for years may see something that triggers prey drive. Also, some Aussies have a harder time controlling their impulses than others, no matter how much training they have. So if you did get an Aussie, you need to get the right one.
1/9/2013 6:33:17 PM

Anonymous

Some Aussies have a stronger prey drive that others. Aussies wouldn't nessesarily be any more likely to do anything to birds that a german shepherds or goldens. If you get a puppy, ask the breeder if the parents have a strong prey drive. Also you would need to socalize your puppy very well to your parrots. If you would adopt a adult dog, be sure to see if they know anything about it's background because it could of had a history of chasing or harming birds. If that dog has a history of a strong prey drive it could be almost immposible to fix. Like the other person said if you get an aussie, it needs to be the right one and should never be unatended. We have two cats and i toltally trust her with them...as long as there is not a bone around. Hope this helps.
1/26/2013 11:40:45 AM

Anonymous

Aussies have working drive, some more than others, the threat of bacterial infections from your birds to the dogs is also a concern. Crate your dogs when you can't be with them, and vacuum daily.
11/24/2013 11:03:45 PM

Anonymous

We had a couple of Aussies, a parakeet and a cat that all played together and took naps together. Never had a problem. Lasted about 8 years until the bird hit wall and broke his neck. Bird rode around on Bobby's head when Bobby was inside. I have 2 parrots and 2 Aussies now and they get along fine.
3/5/2015 6:14:35 AM

Anonymous asked:

12/27/2012 1:31:07 PM

12/27/2012 1:31:07 PM

What are the symptoms of thyroid disease in Aussies?

2 Comments

Anonymous

My vet said a sign of the Aussie coat not growing back in normal is a big indicator... Hope that helps.
4/19/2013 7:06:17 PM

Anonymous

Coat not growing properly, thickening, or blackening of skin, odor, greasy coat. If you suspect anything have a blood test done by your vet.
11/24/2013 11:07:08 PM

Anonymous asked:

12/19/2012 2:25:10 PM

12/19/2012 2:25:10 PM

i have a 13 yr old aussie shepherd slowing down it that normal?

4 Comments

Anonymous

If she or he is only slowing down you are very fortunate! Our loved girl died one month before her 13 birthday. We tried to prolong her life but had to give up. We were told by our Vet, in Texas, that he never saw an Aussie older than 13. You MUST be doing a GREAT Job in taking care of your friend. Jerry
12/23/2012 6:24:50 PM

Anonymous

Aussies typically live 12-15 years of age. Check with your vet. It's extra important to take animals to the vet when they are in their senior years because there can be a increased risk of getting desieses. It's important to treat any health problems right away. It's hard to say but say but you could likely have have a couple of years left with your aussie. It is normal for animals to slow down a little when they get older.
1/26/2013 12:10:33 PM

Anonymous

All dogs slow down when there older! 13 is out standing for the Aussie to just start slowing down. They live usually till 15 so 13 isn't bad at all!! Just keep up with your check ups at the vet. Sounds like your doing a great job!
8/14/2013 1:08:32 PM

Anonymous

Yes, give him/her a thicker bed, maybe consider a supplement for joints, keep going for walks, just shorten the duration, and enjoy the golden years.
11/24/2013 11:05:36 PM

Anonymous asked:

12/19/2012 2:18:53 PM

12/19/2012 2:18:53 PM

life expentancy time What is the life expectancy of the Australian Shepherd?

1 Comment

Anonymous

well cared for Aussies typically live 12 to 15 years.
1/26/2013 1:10:08 PM

Anonymous asked:

12/12/2012 11:10:31 PM

12/12/2012 11:10:31 PM

Can you have a twelve year old male and purchase a male puppy

2 Comments

Anonymous

If I understand your question correctly, you have a 12 year old male dog and want to know if it's safe to buy a male puppy. The answer can vary depending on the temperament and even health of your older dog. If he is generally healthy and well adjusted, and has shown that he enjoys the company of puppies (and is safe with them!) it can be fine. With some dog who really like puppies, adding a puppy with an older dog can help them live longer, since they stay more active and enjoy life more. If your old dog is less healthy and/or doesn't like pups, it may be best to wait. The nice thing if he DOES like pups and is a good dog, he can help teach the puppy the daily routine. It doesn't replace your training too but an adult dog can be a good mentor for a puppy.
12/13/2012 5:39:28 PM

Anonymous

Careful with pups and old timers, the patience is not always there. Is your 12 year old neutered? Has he been well socialized? Does he respect you? Do you crate train? If you answered yes to all 4 then Yes.
11/24/2013 11:10:40 PM

Anonymous asked:

12/8/2012 11:10:59 AM

12/8/2012 11:10:59 AM

Breeding Is it ok to breed blue merle with red merle Australian Shepherd's?

3 Comments

Anonymous

No, it is not ok to breed merle to merle. 1/3 of your litter will be blind/deaf. Serious consequences result from merle to merle breedings. You must breed merles, red or blue, to a tri.
12/14/2012 1:19:33 PM

Anonymous

It is very important to learn as much as possible before you breed dogs. Breeding merles together will result in double merle. 1/3 double merles have hearing loss, seeing loss, or even both blindness and deafness. Also double merles will have a mostly white coat which is not breed standards. hope this helps:)
1/26/2013 2:07:33 PM

Anonymous

NO, NO, NO! As a breeder, it is almost dishonourable to breed merle to merle. Most will have defects like hearing loss, blindness, etc. However, the more dangerous thing is the internal defects. Malformed organs, missing organs, misshapen pups, still-borns, missing legs or eyes, and an incredibly short lifespan if they survive 8 weeks at all it is a miracle. If you want puppies, make sure you know all about Australian Shepherds before you go breeding them. The last thing reputable breeders want is malformed puppies and un-educated breeders on the market. It is very bad for the overall view and performance of the breed.
2/12/2015 5:16:12 PM

Anonymous asked:

11/16/2012 8:11:09 PM

11/16/2012 8:11:09 PM

when do you know if they are full grown i have 8 month old female aussie?

2 Comments

Anonymous

Aussies usually stop growing as far as height (long bones) by a year of age, but may fill out for another year or longer.
11/30/2012 5:47:06 PM

Anonymous

Our Australian Shepherd grew rapidly until she was 6 months old. After that she still grew until she was a little over a year old. She continued to get broader and her coat filled out more until she was about 2 years old. Hope this helps:)
1/26/2013 2:13:02 PM

Anonymous asked:

11/8/2012 9:43:07 PM

11/8/2012 9:43:07 PM

Our Australian Shepherd is a year old and shakes his head all the time. The vet looked at him... Our Australian Shepherd is a year old and shakes his head all the time. The vet looked at him and said that he does not have ear mints. Why would he shake his head

2 Comments

Anonymous

There must be something in his ears or head that bother him. Did the vet also rule out an ear infection or other issue besides ear mites? They can get water in their ears if they swim, or a yeast infection. He also could have something on the skin around his ears or neck - such as a cut or ticks. Even fleas may cause him to do that.
11/12/2012 11:40:36 AM

Anonymous

One of our blue merles that had white ears did that. This was back in the 1950s. We learned that she had partial hearing loss in each ear. She apparently shook them trying to hear better. She was blue on her except her ears. She did it her entire life. About 9 yrs.
3/5/2015 6:33:21 AM

Anonymous asked:

10/20/2012 11:49:14 PM

10/20/2012 11:49:14 PM

How much should you feed an australian shepherd with husky mix?

1 Comment

Anonymous

You might want to talk to your vet. Your vet should be able to tell you.
10/30/2012 2:09:50 PM

Anonymous asked:

10/7/2012 3:47:41 PM

10/7/2012 3:47:41 PM

We have a spayed Aussie right now and I show her in 4-H. (Ps. I'm almost 12 years old.) In... We have a spayed Aussie right now and I show her in 4-H. (Ps. I'm almost 12 years old.) In the future we would like to get a male and a female Aussie to breed. I know there is a LOT to learn about breeding puppies and I have done some research so far but I know there still is a lot more to know. Do you know of any useful information or know any good books, websites, etc. on breeding Australian Shepherds or even just about breeding puppies? Thank You!

3 Comments

Anonymous

Two good sites include www.ashgi.org and http://qualityaussies.webs.com There really IS a lot to learn, both from a health and genetics stand point, as well as the ethics of dog breeding. Breeding dogs just to make money, without regard to the care or quality of life of the adults or puppies is sure not very desirable. There are thousands of purebred Aussies in shelters and rescue, many of which will never find a home and will be put to sleep. A truly responsible breeder does all the health screening possible, to reduce the risk of genetic health issues. They study and learn pedigrees and what good and bad traits are there. They carefully assess the health and temperament of the dogs they breed and if anything is lacking the dog is spayed or neutered. And most of all, they carefully screen homes for their puppies and will take them back at any time, for any reason, if the buyers can't keep them.
10/12/2012 10:27:48 AM

Anonymous

Get on the A.S.C.A.( Australian Shepherd c Club of America) website. They are the parent club. Study the standard, find a reputable breeder in your area, visit a few breed shows, talk to handlers, do your homework. If you don't have a good mentor getting started can be much harder. Do not get two pups at once. Choose a healthy structurally sound pup, show to championship, work on obed, agility etc. as well, get hips, elbows, and eyes checked, as well as D.N.A. then look for a mate. Good luck
11/24/2013 11:21:11 PM

Anonymous

Be careful when you breed. Like mentioned above, if you want to be a reputable breeder, check out ASCA. Make sure when you buy Aussies that the breeder is willing to sell you breeding rights, otherwise, the puppies cannot be registered. Also, don't breed every year. Give the momma a break. It is too hard on their bodies to be having puppies year after year. Look for good confirmation and color when you choose your dogs. And under no circumstances should you EVER, EVER BREED A MERLE TO A MERLE!!!!!!!!!! I cannot stress this enough. The pups WILL be born with defects or they will be born dead. I am by no means an animal rights activist BUT I do take excellent care of my animals whether they be horse, goat, cow, dog, or cat. And breeding a merle to a merle is inhumane at the rawest level. To knowingly breed these should be a crime. All a good breeder should want is to raise good, healthy, active puppies who have the potential of a long, happy life.
2/12/2015 5:21:05 PM

Anonymous asked:

9/23/2012 3:12:38 PM

9/23/2012 3:12:38 PM

We have an almost three year old Aussie named Abby. She can be protective over her bone.... We have an almost three year old Aussie named Abby. She can be protective over her bone. Occasionally she will get very crazy when she chews on her rawhide bone. Abby will grab her bone and jump up on your lap and stick it in your face and growl all at the same time. But the growl sounds more like a "purr" Also she usally has a "Stay away from me" look on her face. We can't tell if Abby is so happy she's making a purr/growl sound or what? It's very confusing. It's hard to explain but she acts like she's protecting her bone but If thats the case, why would she stick it in your face? Do you think it is something that is in the bone that is making her act like this? What do you think is the cause? Do you think she's being protective over it or what? Thank you for taking the time to help know what she's doing!

3 Comments

Anonymous

I have a german shepherd dog that does the same thing so I'm guessing that they have different personalities. I don't know but I can tell you that bones are things to be protective over. Will she ever look at you and have a "can you please go away "look on her face? Miko (my gsd)has that look on his face all the time so I would try to get her/him comfy with people. sorry if it did not help!
11/11/2012 12:07:29 AM

Anonymous

My puppy likes to stick her bones in my face and drop them on me all the time when im doing things, then she barks and talks to me until i give it back to her even though she is the one who set it on me, idk aussies are weird. haha but they are entertaining
3/2/2014 9:10:07 PM

Anonymous

She is either vying for your attention or she is letting you know that that is her bone. If her growling makes you nervous, make sure she knows you ARE BOSS DOG and break her of that habit. Dogs should know that it is NOT okay to growl or bite people period! Unless you are actively trying to nuture their more protective side. This can lead to unsavory behavior towards children or other people in the future. Regardless, no there is nothing wrong. She is just being herself.
2/12/2015 5:23:36 PM

Anonymous asked:

8/5/2012 2:32:09 PM

8/5/2012 2:32:09 PM

I work on a farm (no cattle, more of a corn/cotton farm) and was looking in getting a high... I work on a farm (no cattle, more of a corn/cotton farm) and was looking in getting a high energy dog that will be able to keep up with me on long days on the farm. How do Australian Shepherd dogs normally perform on a farm, and will these dogs get "too tired" or run away (1200 acre farm)? I need an intelligent dog that can be trained to be a farm dog, but also a dog that will be great with my family at the end of the day. Any recommendations to accommodate the needs of a new dog for the work place and family?

5 Comments

Anonymous

Australian Shepherd dogs will definitely not get too tired or run away. I have two and they will only stop working when there is no stimulation around them. Basically, as long as you're up and moving, they are too. I can have both of mine off leash in any environment. This breed will stick to you like glue. They bond with their owner and prefer to follow you rather than explore or run off. My advice would be to start taking them with you even as a puppy to follow you around on your normal work day. They will learn early that when they go to work with you, they are in work mode and when they come home, they can relax with family. I would suggest socializing them at a young age though. My first one was shy because he had only been on a horse farm his first year, so he was very fearful of strangers. They are very easy to train though, they want to please and are loyal to their owners. Hope this helps! After you have an aussie, you won't want any other breed.
8/13/2012 9:55:47 PM

Anonymous

Aussies are one breed that need "NO FENCES" Named a dog TRIPPER years ago because she was underfoot all the time... They love to have a job everyday... I take my dogs on all day trail rides all the time and they never quit. I really can't get off the ranch while wearing boots with spurs without them,they know those boots mean riding!!!! They are the Best...
8/23/2012 12:48:49 PM

Anonymous

Aussies are definitely high energy dogs. Many people have Aussies on farms. In fact I would rather see an Aussie on a farm than in town. If you get an Aussie, you should expect it to not get tired on a farm. If it does get tired, there could be problems. Aussies are certainly like glue and want to get involved in every thing you do. Aussies are EXTREAMLY intelligent and trainable. Most Aussies are very good family dogs. Our Aussie, Abby, cares about the family so much! Its inportant for aussies to have a job such as: agility, fly ball, disk dog, herding, baby sitting the kids, etc.
9/23/2012 1:47:21 PM

Anonymous

Everything below is definitely true. PS. Australian Shepherds LOVE to stuggle!
9/23/2012 1:50:50 PM

Anonymous

an Aussie or Border Collie will be a good fit. I have both. My Aussie is "my" dog, my Border Collie is my husbands. When camping, there were times my usband wanted to take both dogs for a day hike with the dogs while I stayed back at camp...My Aussie loves my husband butit was like pulling teeth trying to get my Aussie to go with him....and when my husband got outside of the general camp ground...my Aussie turned tail and ran back to me. happen four times and then my hubby gave up...but if I went on a hike alone or with my hubby, I didn't even ask my Aussie to join me, he was right at my side.
11/17/2013 12:13:33 PM

Anonymous asked:

7/27/2012 5:28:08 PM

7/27/2012 5:28:08 PM

I want to cut my dog's hair but I don't know if it is going to grow again. Should I do it? She... I want to cut my dog's hair but I don't know if it is going to grow again. Should I do it? She is a Australian shepherd puppy.

4 Comments

Anonymous

It is not recommended to shave a double coated dog unless it is so badly matted it can't be brushed out. It isn't as bad to trim the longer areas such as the bottoms of paws, around the ears and the tail area for neatness. Some dogs who are shaved never grow a normal coat again. Some do, but it is hard to know until it's done and if it ruins the coat, you can't go back and fix it. Also, the more it is shaved the thicker it comes back each time.
7/28/2012 11:55:37 AM

Anonymous

the dogs coat is a form of insulation, keeping the intense heat out , and keeping the animal warm in wintertime, don't mess with nature!
7/6/2013 5:57:35 PM

Anonymous

I have 2 that is in the house and I shave them twice a year and no problems at all there hair comes back the same as it was before I shaved them and by shaving them they have stayed cooler in the summer and I add a coat for each in the winter but mine are 1 thick long haired and 1 is thin haired and long and shed a lot so the shaving makes them look funny for about 2 weeks but they feel a lot better and will stay outside longer but they will also sunburn if left out in the sun and they don't wont to stay out as long if it is really cold after they have been shaved so I have there hair cut a little longer in the cooler months
12/21/2014 10:11:53 PM

Anonymous

I would argue against them being cooler. Aussies have an under-coat that helps keep them insulated FROM the hot air in the summer. If you shave them, they lose that protection. If they are mainly inside dogs, it is not as big a deal. But for active dogs that enjoy being outside, it is not a very good idea to shave them.
2/12/2015 5:26:01 PM

Anonymous asked:

7/19/2012 5:38:36 AM

7/19/2012 5:38:36 AM

Why does my aussie let me hold her paws & play with her paws, but does not let me cut her nails... Why does my aussie let me hold her paws & play with her paws, but does not let me cut her nails & panics when i try to?

3 Comments

Anonymous

You probably need to desensitize your with to the sound of the nail clippers. I suggest getting a small pile of VERY good treats. Click the trimmers and give a treat. Practice often, so she associates the sound of the trimmers with something good. THEN it's time to start working on her nails again. Clip one, give a treat. If you only do one or two at a time at first, she may not get overwhelmed or over stimulated by the process. Also, if you anticipate it being a problem, you will give off that vibe and she'll pick it up. Try to keep a calm, positive attitude about it, like it is no big deal. That will help her feel the same. Aussies are very tuned into our moods and what we project (if we are nervous, stressed, mad, happy, etc).
7/21/2012 6:14:31 PM

Anonymous

I agree with the above. My dog and I love it sit in the sun in the mornings on the couch. So this is a very calm, happy time for us. So I started bringing the nail clippers out and kept her relaxed and clipped a couple nails. If she started getting panicky, I didn't push it. Each time I could clip more and more. Now it is no big deal to sit down and do all of them. She thinks it is quality time with her mom. Just be patient, stay calm, and make it a positive experience.
11/26/2012 11:48:18 PM

Anonymous

Most dogs panic when you first start cutting their nails. What I have done is made my Aussie lie on her back between my outstretched legs, almost like a trough and lay her head towards me. This makes her calm down and trust me. When I start cutting her nails, if she freaks out, it is very easy for me to calm her down and go again. Plus, she can't get away as easily and scratch me up. An important thing to remember is to NOT let her get away. If she gets away, she knows she got away with running away. This will make it 10 times more difficult for you to catch and clip her nails next time.
2/12/2015 5:28:48 PM

Anonymous asked:

7/19/2012 5:03:30 AM

7/19/2012 5:03:30 AM

i have a 5yr. old aussie/english shepherd mix. she can sit but no other training. i had 5 dogs &... i have a 5yr. old aussie/english shepherd mix. she can sit but no other training. i had 5 dogs & worked all the time & didn't have time to train her. now i'm retired & the other 3 all died of old age, so its just her & an 11 yr.old, is it too late to train her so she has some manners???she is lovable but she doesn't come when called, pushes her way out the door & is "a wild woman" i know it was my fault but is there hope? please HELP thank-you

2 Comments

Anonymous

It is never too late to train a dog and instill boundaries. Depending on your skill and methods, you may get very quick results. If you aren't sure what to do, it would be good to work with a qualified behaviorist who can give you tips and methods in person. I have done foster/rescue work with dogs of all ages, and know any dog of any age can be trained.
7/21/2012 6:12:10 PM

Anonymous

It's NEVER to late to train a dog! Older dogs can certainly learn about anything you want to teach them. Older dogs are often easier to teach than puppys because they're more relaxed and focused than hyper little puppies. So there is deffently hope!!!! I hope your training goes well!
9/23/2012 3:21:47 PM

Anonymous asked:

7/17/2012 5:05:24 PM

7/17/2012 5:05:24 PM

Why does my Aussie insist on raking my and mine and my wife's legs with her front paws? She uses... Why does my Aussie insist on raking my and mine and my wife's legs with her front paws? She uses her nails as a real attention getter (bad attention from us). Any ideas as to how to break this painful (especially in the summer with shorts) habit?

1 Comment

Anonymous

She does this to get attention. I am guessing in the past it has worked, even if it's negative attention. Trying to train a behavior that is incompatible, and showing her that when she does that she will be totally ignored (easier said than done, I know, if it is painful!) I would use a verbal correction like an AAAAAGH sound (rather than "no.") As you do that sound, step into her and turn around. You are telling her you are in charge but will not reward her pawing you. If and when she approaches, BEFORE she does it ask her to sit and reward her before she has a chance to use her feet. Timing is everything in a case like this. Any time a dog does something that works, it will repeat it. So the key is not to reward this behavior in any way and at the same time reward behaviors that are what you want.
7/18/2012 12:28:09 PM

Anonymous asked:

7/17/2012 1:12:28 AM

7/17/2012 1:12:28 AM

I am 21 yrs old and live in a one bedroom house with partially fenced in yard and am thinking... I am 21 yrs old and live in a one bedroom house with partially fenced in yard and am thinking about getting an Australian Shepherd. Also I have never owned a dog before, and read they may not be a good first dog. However, I have always wanted one and am fully willing to put in the time to exercise him mentally and physically. I have plenty of time to spend with the pup now, but in 8 months I will be moving, and starting an 8-5 job, so the dog would most likely be alone all day at this time(except lunch). Would it be a good idea for me to get one now, or could the dog become depressed and cause problems in 8 months when I have to leave him alone most the day? I will still be able to exercise him but I didn't know if the sudden change would bother him? Also I was wondering about what the average cost of owning a mini is a month(food, vet, etc.). Thanks for any advice!

2 Comments

Anonymous

How well an Aussie does when left alone will depend on temperament of the individual dog, how much exercise he gets, and other factors. Many Aussies don't do well left alone all day. Others can adjust. The best thing is to find a very experienced breeder who can be honest about the traits and needs of her dogs, who can help you make this decision. A good site with plenty of info on Aussies is: http://qualityaussies.webs.com/ Also, a "mini" is not an Aussie. It is a mix breed or different breed, but not just a "small, real Aussie." Some of the information you read about real Aussies may or may not be relevent with that type of dog, since they have had other breeds mixed in. How much it costs to take care of any dog depends on the quality of food, how healthy the dog is and other factors. Finding a pup from parents who have had all the health screening dog is very important. By that I mean OFA for hips and elbows, CERF eye exams, MDR1 and HSF4 testing and more.
7/17/2012 2:32:29 PM

Anonymous

Are first time dog was an Aussie and she's been a great first time dog! It certainly was a challange though! So Aussies usually are a great first time dog. If the owners do enough training, etc. with her. Aussies are fairly adaptable dogs so your should't have to much of a problem with the move, especially since she wouldn't be at that house for long. I probably wouldn't recommend keeping her in the house all day long while your at work. You can take him to a doggie day care were they will watch him and let him play with other dog, etc. If you would keep him at home, be sure to walk him or give him a long play before you go and spend lots of time with him in the evening. If you get an Aussie, You probably won't want any other breed of dog!
9/23/2012 3:43:45 PM

Anonymous asked:

7/1/2012 10:07:18 PM

7/1/2012 10:07:18 PM

I just got an Aussie puppy and she is 8 weeks old a few days ago and shes alredy learned a few... I just got an Aussie puppy and she is 8 weeks old a few days ago and shes alredy learned a few things. I've taught her no maam when she is doing something she isn't supposed to. But when I take her for car rides she cries and barks most of the time. Is this normal?

5 Comments

Anonymous

Hello! I had the same issue with my Aussie. But ever since she learned that going in the car means a fun adventure, she enjoys it. When you put your puppy in the car, don't drive anywhere yet. Give her some treats, tell her it's okay. I know she's too little to jump in on her own, but when she is big enough, she should be more than happy to jump in on her own. You should check this website out http://www.dogtrainingblogger.com/my-dog-hates-to-travel.html I hope this helped!
7/2/2012 12:49:27 PM

Anonymous

It did. I'll have to try it out. Also, she whines sometimes when I am walking her outside or when she is walking around the house. Is there any particular reason she may whine?
7/2/2012 11:44:30 PM

Anonymous

Barking and whining may be a sign the dog is stressed or over stimulated. Try to figure out why she's doing it, and start to change her mind about the situations. A good command to teach an Aussie pup is "watch me." Start in the house where things are not too exciting, and use food rewards. Hold the treat to your face where she sees it and give the command. This breed usually wants to watch your face anyway but build this into a command she always responds to. In the car, try crating her so she can't see out. Also doing as the other person said, start conditioning her to the car without going anywhere. Aussies can be intense dogs so if you are not sure you can train her right, find a qualified behaviorist NOW, before she develops a lot of bad habits or reactive behavior.
7/5/2012 11:09:10 AM

Anonymous

I forgot to say that what I meant by changing your Aussie's mind about it is to help her feel more comfortable in situations that may stress or overstimulate, by building a positive association. If you just correct a dog for exhibiting stress it will only get worse. The same goes for dogs who growl, if you correct that instead of changing how they feel about what makes them growl, they will just bite. Then they get blamed for "biting with no warning" because they repeatedly got corrected for warning that they were not comfortable or were stressed by something.
7/6/2012 1:53:34 PM

Anonymous

My aussie was the same way. I found out that he was happier in the backseat than the front seat. When I got an suv with seats that folded down he liked that the best. We keep his blanket and bed back there and he has lots of room to move around. My suggestion is to try different seats and keep taking her and her things with you so she can figure out it's not so bad.
9/17/2012 3:53:14 PM

Anonymous asked:

6/9/2012 1:35:15 PM

6/9/2012 1:35:15 PM

what do you think about Walker Hound X Australian Shepherd puppies. I tend to work about 10 hrs... what do you think about Walker Hound X Australian Shepherd puppies. I tend to work about 10 hrs a day m-f, is this too long to keep this kind of dog alone? I read about both breeds, but not sure how they mix

2 Comments

Anonymous

That is going to be too long for any puppy. Puppies need frequent potty breaks, but also need ongoing training and socializing, exercise and company if they are going to develop into sound, stable dogs with good temperaments. Unless you have a way to make sure a puppy will have those needs met, it would be good to wait to get a puppy until you are home more. An 8 week old puppy may need a potty breaks every couple hours.
6/12/2012 11:45:37 PM

Anonymous

This may not work to have a puppy being away 10 hours because they need to have a potty break every 30 minutes. Although you can take your puppy to a doggie day care. The puppy should get lots of potty breaks, get to play with other dogs, and socialize with humans. Besure not to get confused with doggie day care and bording kennels. Bording kennels will take your dog on potty breaks but still the dog would be in a kennels a lot. Which I don't beleive dogs should spend all day, every day in a kennel. (Not that bording kennels are bad, but not the best for a regular basis.) Hope this helps!
11/11/2012 12:40:24 AM

Anonymous asked:

6/8/2012 1:36:07 PM

6/8/2012 1:36:07 PM

I have heard that Aussies are smart and protective and I hope that it true, are they ? Also, how... I have heard that Aussies are smart and protective and I hope that it true, are they ? Also, how many Aussies normally have two eye colors ? I am preferinging one that has two eye colors, are there alot out there ?

3 Comments

Anonymous

Yes, Aussies are very intelligent, most are quite trainable, and some can be protective or even over protective. It is good to really do your homework in choosing a breeder and bloodline, as not all Aussies have genetically stable temperaments. Any eye color is acceptable and fairly common in Aussies, so even ones with different eye colors are not unusual. However, finding a puppy from parents who have had health screening for genetic disorders, as well as having sound temperaments, would be a lot more important than selecting a puppy just for eye or coat color. You can read a lot more about many topics pertaining to Aussies on this site: http://qualityaussies.webs.com
6/12/2012 11:48:07 PM

Anonymous

Yes! Aussies are EXTREAMLY smart and trainable, but such a smart dog can make more work involved in training. My Aussie is VERY smart which I love. but when I show her in obedience, she's to smart for her own good which usauly gets us a low score! Aussies are also very protective and need to have lots of socalization so they don't get to protective. It is somewhat common for Aussies to have two different colored eyes or splite or swirled. It is most common in merles. My red merle Aussie has one green-brown eye and one blue with some brown in it!
6/25/2012 12:42:37 PM

Anonymous

Below I forgot to include something. About the obedience thing, we are working through the problems. So your aussie will probably be obedient if you sucsesfully train your aussie. I just ment that aussies are so smart that it may not be such a good thing for all people. Aussies are fast learners! By the way the other responce I did to this question should be right below this responce.
11/11/2012 12:50:12 AM

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