Australian Cattle Dog/Blue Heeler Breeders with Puppies for Sale

Australian Cattle Dog/Blue Heeler Breed Information

Breed Group: Herding
Australian Cattle Dog/Blue Heeler

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Characteristics
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Weight
35-45 lbs
Height
Male: 18-20; Female: 17-19 inches
Color(s)
Blue or blue-mottled with or without other markings; red speckled. Puppies are born white but get their color within a few weeks.
Overview
Originating in Australia during the 19th century, the Australian Cattle Dog was bred for endurance, herding abilities, and toughness. Often referred to as Blue Heeler, Red Heeler, and Queensland Heeler, this breed is considered to be one of the three most popular dog breeds in Australia.
Character
The Australian Cattle Dog is compact, strong, alert, and agile. This breed is trustworthy, courageous, and is exceedingly devoted to the duties they are given. A member of the working and herding group, the Australian Cattle Dog is a combination of substance, balance, power, and hard muscular condition.
Temperament
An extremely intelligent, loyal, and affectionate breed, the Australian Cattle Dog is protective of their family, home, and territory. They thrive on human interaction and activity but are easily bored which can lead to serious behavior issues. This breed is generally not good with children they have not been raised with. They are typically suspicious of strangers and may be aggressive to dogs they do not know. They do not get along well with other household pets or cats. This breed will attempt to herd and nip at the heels of anything and everything that moves. The Australian Cattle Dog has a high level of dominance and is not recommended for the novice, sedentary, or apathetic dog owner.
Care
The Australian Cattle Dog needs weekly brushing with a firm bristle brush. Extra attention should be given to the coat during seasonal shedding. Bathing should only be done when absolutely necessary using a mild shampoo. This breed is prone to such health issues as PRA, deafness, and hip dysplasia.
Coat
The Australian Cattle Dog has a weather resistant double coat. The outer coat is flat, hard, straight, and close. The under coat is dense and short. The color of the coat comes in blue, red speckle, blue speckle, or blue-mottled. The blue coat has markings of black, blue, or tan. Puppies are born white. However, adult coat color is visible in the pads of the paws. This breed is a seasonal shedder.
Training
Early intense socialization and obedience are crucial for the Australian Cattle Dog. This breed is extremely obedient. Australian Cattle Dogs do not respond to harsh or heavy-handed methods. Training must be done with firmness, fairness, praise, consistency, and patience. They are very talented in such areas as herding, agility, retrieving, guarding, competitive obedience, and in learning tricks.
Activity
The Australian Cattle Dog has an inordinate amount of stamina and requires a great deal of exercise. This breed will become destructive if not sufficiently stimulated. They are not recommended for apartment or city dwelling but do best in a rural setting or in a home with a large securely fenced yard.
Ownership
Help reduce the number of Australian Cattle Dog/Blue Heeler puppies in shelters by doing your due diligence. Many puppies are often purchased with little or no knowledge of what goes into parenting one. Uneducated decisions often leave the puppy in need of adoption and in the care of rescue groups. Bringing home a puppy into your family has many benefits but we first implore you to educate yourself. An informed decision will take into account the characteristics of the breed, your lifestyle, expected veterinary care, the demands and limitations of owning one, their activity requirements and levels of companionship required.
Characteristics
Size:
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Featured Australian Cattle Dog/Blue Heeler Breeder

JonVers Australian Cattle Dogs
Member Since: November 2003
Location: Palm Springs, California
I have Australian Cattle Dog/Blue Heeler puppies for sale! See My Profile
ACD pups sired by a fabulous Australian Import. Adult dogs are health tested and all pups will never lose their sight to prcd-PRA. Please visit our links page for more information on health testing. Our primary goal is to produce conformationally correct puppies with fabulous temperaments. Our puppi...

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About Australian Cattle Dog Blue Heelers

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Anonymous asked:

8/27/2014 8:42:08 PM

8/27/2014 8:42:08 PM

Is there a difference between a miniature blue heeler and a blue heeler? Are they one in the same? Trying to ascertain if there's a difference. One question in the FAQ list said a mini could be as big as 35-50 lbs. Sounds like a regular blue heeler...

2 Comments

Anonymous

As to the AKC (American Kennel Club) and the CKC (Canadian Kennel Club), there is no such true breed as the Miniature Blue Heeler (AKA: Australian Cattle Dog). Although, some dogs can be smaller on the standard scale. The Australian Cattle Dog/Blue or Red Heeler can be anywhere from 40 - 60 lbs at adulthood. However, there is another breed that is close to the Australian Cattle Dog, which is called the Stumpy Tailed Cattle Dog. This dog resembles the A.C.D, but is smaller and of course, has a stumpy tail. The average weight of this breed is 35 - 45 lbs at adulthood. This breed could be considered to some as the 'Miniature version' of the Blue/Red Heeler (Australian Cattle Dog).
8/28/2014 9:36:43 AM

Anonymous

Dogs are "Miniaturized" by taking runts of the litters and breeding them ois ver and over to obtain as small of dog as passable. This practice usually ends up with overly fragile and puppies that have or will end up with massive health issues and generally shortens the life span. There are a few breeds that actually have size variation. The Best Advice is talk to a vet about your dog Not all puppie born to runt litters are small but can have the same health issues as there smaller siblings. NEVER BUY A PUPPY FROM A UNACCREDITED BREEDER OR A PET STORE !!! ASK FOR PROOF OF ACCREDITATION!!!
8/31/2014 8:56:21 PM

Anonymous asked:

6/21/2013 2:25:29 AM

6/21/2013 2:25:29 AM

Can you train a herding dog to hunt small animals? (ducks,birds, ect.) Just basically any herding type breed. but im most likely looking at Australian cattle dogs and Australian shepherds.

2 Comments

Anonymous

Heeler will hurd or chase a flock of ducks or geese on the ground where ever you want them to go, but my experience anything that flys away they loose interest in.
2/20/2014 4:28:16 PM

Anonymous

It would be unwise to train your herding dog to hunt ducks/birds/small mammals. In any case, the dog could decide one day that the cattle, sheep or horses you've trained it to herd are also prey and it could become aggressive towards the farm stock. I would suggest getting a hunting dog and go from there.
5/2/2014 11:28:24 AM

Anonymous asked:

4/7/2013 8:16:38 PM

4/7/2013 8:16:38 PM

Male 6 yr old BH has a slightly protruding eye with bloodshot in the white area. Is it a prob? Male 6 yr old Blue Heeler has a slightly protruding eye with bloodshot white area. It comes and goes. A friend has grown heelers with a white flecked coat. Unusual?

2 Comments

Anonymous

Within this breed there are several eye disorders and diseases that can arise as the dogs ages if the bloodlines were not certified free of these issues prior to any breeding. Have a Vet check the eye. Maybe you'll be lucky and it is only a minor in jury or infection..but it could be glaucoma or any one of several issues that could cause him to lose his vision or even lose the eye itself.
4/9/2013 11:29:38 AM

Anonymous

I have a Queensland Pup who's eyes also do this. Usually with mine, it come sand go's. She usually get's it when she is super tired from all say activity, or because she just ran a lap chasing birds. I would not see it as a problem as long as your dog is not running into walls when it happens. But I would just make sure to keep an eye on him.
6/30/2014 2:18:50 AM

Anonymous asked:

4/7/2013 7:56:32 PM

4/7/2013 7:56:32 PM

What is the history of a "Bentley mark" or white blaze on my blue heeler? What is the history of a "Bentley mark" or white blaze on my blue heeler?

2 Comments

Anonymous

This mark can be traced to a purebred dog owned by Thomas Bentley. According to legend, a popular dog owned by Tom Bentley passed on this distinctive mark to all Australian Cattle Dogs. They also frequently have a white tip to the tail and a small white patch on the chest.
4/9/2013 11:32:34 AM

Anonymous

Timmons being the original foundation creator of what is now called the Qweensland Heeler or Blue Heeler..more commonly called the Australian Cattle Dog.
4/9/2013 11:33:32 AM

Anonymous asked:

4/1/2013 6:43:05 AM

4/1/2013 6:43:05 AM

1yo Red heeler - always keeps her ears back I have a female red heeler who has just turned one. She only ever pricks her ears up when she ears a noise or is interested in something otherwise her ears are always kept back in a submissive position. Is this normal? We also have a 6yo male blue heeler who is definitely the dominant dog, could this be why she feels she always has to take a submissive stance?

1 Comment

Anonymous

Every dog is different and if your female is naturally submissive, then yes, it is normal. But since you have a dominant male dog, it is also normal for her to take the submissive position compared to him.
7/9/2014 12:58:08 PM

Anonymous asked:

3/26/2013 12:06:53 PM

3/26/2013 12:06:53 PM

help for breeding heelersvirgins. I have a 4 year old red heeler virgin. We are trying to breed with a blue heeler female. She is a virgin too.We have had her since Sunday and nothing has happened. What should I do? Never done this before. Please help.

1 Comment

Anonymous

It is important to learn much, much about breeding before you do so to ensure you can give the pups as good a life as possible. As well as giving the new owner the best dog as possible. (It also depends on how the owner takes care of the dog, trains, etc.) The adult heelers should have good temperment. Do good with other people and dogs. Needs to be in good health, also. Good luck!
4/2/2013 3:39:57 PM

Anonymous asked:

2/6/2013 1:53:34 PM

2/6/2013 1:53:34 PM

What is the best dog food for a heeler?? My Australian Cattle Dog/Blue Heeler is an inside dog that has had some allergies and is allergic to fleas...I do give him a flea pill once a month to control that..but want a good food for him.

1 Comment

Anonymous

our blue healer wont eat anything besides purina beneful or those beef burgers dog food wise. he will eat anything human food wise lol
9/23/2014 9:06:15 PM

Anonymous asked:

1/23/2013 5:37:26 PM

1/23/2013 5:37:26 PM

what is the difference between an Australian Shepherd and an Australian Cattle Dog what is the difference between an Australian Shepherd and an Australian Cattle Dog

2 Comments

Anonymous

Australian shepherds are more prone to health problems and have a heavier variety of coat colors, a thicker coat as well. Australian cattle dogs can sometimes live longer, their necks are very thick, and are more hardy health-wise.
2/9/2013 4:10:17 PM

Anonymous

Australian cattle dogs and Australian Shepherds are certainly two different breeds. But they are both in the herding group and have cemilarities too. I have a Australian shepherd and i've been around heelers, also. Aussies have lots of feathering and blue heelers have shorter coats. The two breeds are about the same size although heelers are usually heavier boned I would say. The other person said Aussies have more health problems. Well, Heelers may be somewhat less prone to health problems but Australian Shepherds are pretty healthy breeds as well. Australian Shepherds (Aussies) are breed to spend long days out working cattle and most can excell at any dog sport. I would also say that Aussies have more energy as well. I think that Australian Shepherds and Australian Cattle Dogs are both wonderful breeds.
4/2/2013 4:08:46 PM

Anonymous asked:

1/19/2013 7:23:27 AM

1/19/2013 7:23:27 AM

16 yr. old female- nervous,shakes, hard breathing, jumpy won't settle down in the house in last 2 mo we have 2 dogs yellow lab 16 great shape and blue heeler.. had both since puppies together. we went away and left dogs with dog sitter and blue heeler is very nervous shaky,heavy breathing in the house.. light shadows seem to frighten her. take her in the car and shes fine. What to do with her to overcome this condition. She hears and sees fine. it happens mostly after dark.. in the house until morning daylight. then she gets much better. didn't want to put her on any meds as we did use benadryl.. 10 mg. didn't like seeing her get so disorientated. no more benadryl for temporary relief.

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Anonymous asked:

1/18/2013 10:31:59 AM

1/18/2013 10:31:59 AM

My family just got a 3 year male blue heeler..he has started growling and trying to bite my husband. What can we do to stop this? We are afraid he might attack him.

1 Comment

Anonymous

Heelers are overly protective, he will learn to respect him and it should all change.
2/11/2013 10:23:13 AM

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Updated: 12/18/2014